Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Sheaffer's Criteria For Pricing In The 1930S And 1940S


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 checkrail

checkrail

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Location:Dumfriesshire, Scotland
  • Flag:

Posted 16 October 2017 - 23:36

After searching for quite a long time on a number of occasions I remain rather unclear on what features Sheaffer assigned to the different imprinted prices on their pens during this period. Some are obvious, more gold, for example, and in the '40s an open or Triumph nib, but others are less clear to me. Is sized, for example, an automatic criterion?
I would be really grateful if those knowledgeable could explain what criteria in Sheaffer's estimate constituted, for example, $10.00, $12.50, $15.00 or $17.50 value. When I look at pictures and listings it often seems hard to tell.
Kind regards,
Timothy

Sponsored Content

#2 welch

welch

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,574 posts
  • Location:New York, NY
  • Flag:

Posted 17 October 2017 - 23:14

Fascinating question. Do you mean within a given model or across Sheaffer models for a given year?

 

Might be an easier question for Parker just because Tony Fischier's Parker Penography organizes Parker model history, and pricing, for us. Within Parker, for instance, we know that a P-51 Vac started with the lustraloy cap and prices increased by quality of metal in the cap, mostly. 

 

Two variables we know (and you probably know, as well!):

 

- Parker had no debt when the Great Depression hit, giving them more flexibility. Parker reduced workforce hours, but seems to have kept most of their employees. Sheaffer might have had less room to cut prices or to make pens for "5-and-dime" stores. 

 

- In December, 1941, the US went to all-out war production. Parker and Sheaffer could make few pens, and shifted advertising toward "when we've won". 

 

Business was anything but normal from 1929 until the late '40s, and by then some companies were experimenting with ballpoint pens.


Don't take any job that requires new clothes.

#3 checkrail

checkrail

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Location:Dumfriesshire, Scotland
  • Flag:

Posted 19 October 2017 - 12:23

Thanks for those ideas. I suppose Sheaffer's imprinting of some prices rather than incorporating them in the chalk mark or just in the catalogue, drew my interest, not the fact of the imprinting but insight into value in mass FP market days, when buyers at all price points had to be catered for. That led me to think about what might be the considerations relevant in the placing of price variants in a particular model. Between models would the same price point mean the same size of nib, for example?
I suppose my understanding is clouded by the frequent divergence between what would be perceived as premium at the time and collector value now where generally rarity trumps worth at the time the pens were made. In modern pens larger weight and size are valued, while in the past the former seems not to have been such a consideration. I don't know that I have made myself much clearer. 😕

#4 WHITE METAL ONLY

WHITE METAL ONLY

    Dipped Only

  • Member - Silver

  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 18 November 2017 - 18:09

Timothy : Here is your answer, in regard to the SHEAFFER'S / SHEAFFER price range.  The SHEAFFER'S / SHEAFFER  "system" follows quite a standard approach : the 4 categories are usually like this > $10.00 : Plain plastic cap and barrel, with stainless steel nib & chrome clip & centre band. > $12.50 : Chrome plated cap & clip, with plastic barrel, and stainless steel nib. > $15.00 >  Plain plastic cap and barrel, with gold nib, clip and centre band. > $ 17.50 > Gold cap, clip and nib, with plastic barrel. Most of these "four models/types" lines ;  the $10.00/$12.50/$15.00/$17.50, also offered a solid silver( brushed or brilliant stainless steel), with stainless steel nib and clip ;  or, gold, with gold nib and clip. I have included a few photo images, all of which are of the silver metal colour, hence, my moniker WHITE METAL ONLY. I refrain from the use yellow gold, and brass for that matter. My collection is all based in white metal ; whether that be, chrome plating, stainless steel, aluminium, white gold, pewter or, palladium. My primary concern, being pens made by SHEAFFER. I have been using a SHEAFFER fountain pen, since 1963. My first pen, along with a few cartridges, cost me the princely sum of $1.00 ! (maybe 10 bob >shillings). I have included a photo image, of the pen package, and the pen itself.  I actually, still have that pen. Depending upon your age, you may find it hard to conceive of such a price for anything at all ; as a matter of fact, our dollar is now a coin ! we eliminated the $1.00 bill, quite some time ago, these days, a dollar is a down payment for a KIT-KAT bar ! I am hopeful that this information was of some help to you. Best Wishes. /////// P.S. > My Dad was a RANGERS fan & my MUM was a CELTIC fan. 

Attached Images

  • $(KGrHqR,!l4E4lPkFbKCBONBQOp+TQ~~0_3.jpg
  • 330 grey ct2.jpg
  • 500 TD Dolphin Grey2.jpg
  • $(KGrHqV,!h8E4p9gc!UdBONBQKs3gg~~0_3.jpg
  • 755acf632525f4736787fe2f934aa22f.jpg
  • 5da82f6cec371c3c62f4c4e0753ecd54.jpg


#5 checkrail

checkrail

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 269 posts
  • Location:Dumfriesshire, Scotland
  • Flag:

Posted 21 November 2017 - 22:10

That is just the sort of information I was interested in. Thank you very much.
I remember the prices well. 5/-(25p), which now would buy you a packet of crisps, bought at 1/- per day a week of two course school lunches when I was at primary school in the '60s.
Kind regards,
Timothy






Sponsored Content




|