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Might This Be A Parker 45 Pencil?

mechanical pencil jotter parker

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25 replies to this topic

#21 parkergeo

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 02:41

 

Not claiming to be an expert, but I don´t think this is a 45 model, but rather a Jotter.

 

 

The second picture at the top of the post shows a pretty clear "45" engraving on the cap, so I'm not sure what is confusing about that. 

 

Liuna - the last version of the P45 family in the 2000's had an altered clip and a rounded black jewel on the top of the clip, referred to as a cabochon. You can still see this style sold on Amazon as the Parker Galaxy made in India by Luxor. 



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#22 Spikey Mike

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 15:53

Parker started making the "Parker Cartridge Pencil" which was way ahead of it's time when released in the late 60's. A simple cartridge the same size as the ball point cartridge would be inserted in any push button Parker ball point to convert it into a pencil. Early metal ones used 0.04 inch leads which are no longer available although you can use 0.9mm ones which are just a shade loose but workable. The all metal ones could be removed, replaced etc just like a ball point cartridge.

 

The later plastic ones made in Japan used a more modern 0.5mm lead but tended to be a bit more fiddly in that they have an O ring at the nib end that makes removal difficult without damaging the ring. 

 

It seems a really neat idea, and they work really well ... I still use 2 of the old metal ones in Parker 45 ball point bodies ... 

 

Have a look at the bottom of this page: http://pencollect.co.uk/converters.htm


pen01.jpg pen02.jpg


#23 PaulS

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 17:20

Have a suspicion that parkergeo's words regarding Wahl's comment that  "don´t think this is a 45 model, but rather a Jotter."  -  is a misunderstanding as to who posted what.                             Wahl's correction, I believe, was to me and not the o.p.  -  the top pen in my picture is apparently a Jotter, and not a 45 as I had wrongly assumed. :) 



#24 Liuna

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 21:44

Parker started making the "Parker Cartridge Pencil" which was way ahead of it's time when released in the late 60's. A simple cartridge the same size as the ball point cartridge would be inserted in any push button Parker ball point to convert it into a pencil. Early metal ones used 0.04 inch leads which are no longer available although you can use 0.9mm ones which are just a shade loose but workable. The all metal ones could be removed, replaced etc just like a ball point cartridge.

 

The later plastic ones made in Japan used a more modern 0.5mm lead but tended to be a bit more fiddly in that they have an O ring at the nib end that makes removal difficult without damaging the ring. 

 

It seems a really neat idea, and they work really well ... I still use 2 of the old metal ones in Parker 45 ball point bodies ... 

 

Have a look at the bottom of this page: http://pencollect.co.uk/converters.htm

 

That's very interesting, thank you :)

I didn't know there was an easily replacable version of any Parker pencil cartridge. It would be funny/interesting to change the pen filling to a pencil cartridge from time to time. As I see it was in that thicker size only (1,1 mm), so it's a bit like the earlier version of mechanical pencils, propelling pencil (I actually found one made by Koh-I-Noor).

All the Jotter mechanical pencils I found have plastic cartridges inside them, I posted a photo about both 45 and classic ones' cartridges earlier, opened up.

 

 

 

 

The second picture at the top of the post shows a pretty clear "45" engraving on the cap, so I'm not sure what is confusing about that. 

 

Liuna - the last version of the P45 family in the 2000's had an altered clip and a rounded black jewel on the top of the clip, referred to as a cabochon. You can still see this style sold on Amazon as the Parker Galaxy made in India by Luxor. 

 

Yeah, I can see it, but I didn't really realize from the photos it was a cabochon at first (found similiar ones earlier when browsing photos of 45 pens and pencils. It was a bit hard to tell from the view the photos were taken (official ones). They look very nice :)
Now I got to be somewhat fond of the metallic blue, "Waterloo" named color version... (Are those metallic ones are full metal like flighters? I'm not sure.)


Edited by Liuna, 19 October 2017 - 21:45.


#25 Liuna

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 20:42

A little interesting thing happened: it turned out my boyfriend had a Parker 45 pen, it has the exact same look, color as my mechanical pencil :) It has IIIN date code, first quarter of 1989 if I'm correct. '89 and '99 have the same coding (See here at http://parkerpens.net/codekey.html ), but the new logo came in from 1999 so then it could be 1989 only, right? (It has the old logo next to Parker and no logo on top of either). 

On both photos, IIIN (1989, the pen) is on the left and Y (1996, the pencil) on the right.

Also, can it be known from when they used Made in UK after Made in England?

Attached Images

  • Parker 45 Toll és Mechanikus Ceruza.png
  • Parker 45 Toll és Mechanikus Ceruza Dátum Kódok.png

Edited by Liuna, 23 October 2017 - 20:45.


#26 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 00:25

I have a 45 Flighter BP/MP set which is constructed like this. Both the ballpoint and the pencil. If I recall correctly he sent me both, but I could be mistaken. Both are made in UK, and he is a UK resident. It belonged to a family member who had it since new. I received it without the box however. I never looked for date codes. It is the dimpled tassie.


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: mechanical, pencil, jotter, parker



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