Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Size Of The Ipg Nibs

iridium point germany replacement

13 replies to this topic

#1 iruciperi

iruciperi

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 October 2017 - 13:00

Hi friends.

 

 

I bought a custom pen from a local store with magnificent wooden-made body. The problem is that, it has a cheap IPG (Iridium Point Germany) nib and not working well.

 

I can grind it by myself, but I don't think it's deserve it because it is so cheap.

 

 

So I decided to replace the nib. It seems like JOWO or BOCK #5-size, but I'm not sure because I have no #5-size-nib pen. 

 

Do you guys have any experience for replacing the IPG nib to nibs made by BOCK or JOWO? 

 

 

If not all the IPG nibs have the same size, I can measure my IPG nib and tell you.

 

 

Best regards.

 

 



Sponsored Content

#2 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,551 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 05 October 2017 - 13:35

If there is any 'iridium' tipping, on the IPG nib, smooth it.

The tipping is standard, in I think Bock and JoWo and everyone else that buys the 'iridium' tipping made in Germany or the world uses the same company which makes the tipping.

 

It's the care factory grinding of the nib that makes the nib smooth or not. Modern smooth tipping was perfected in WW2. Before that it was lumpy and chunks fell off.

In the 20-30's much engineering was spent trying to make the cheapest long wearing tipping possible, often changing from one year to the next with in the same company. Spend a dollar to save a penny. There is a good article on that somewhere.

 

Over a few decades since the war, a standard of long lasting 'iridium' compounds would have developed, that I doubt improved. Not enough to waste an engineer on. Cheap and good enough.....none ever went best of all. 'Iridium compounds', have always been more expensive than gold. Iridium is not much used any more, too scarce, just here and there a few inches of asteroid dust....wasn't used in the '30's as I remember reading. Other rare earths took it's place. 

The question was how can I make a good tipping cheap.....or a good cheap tipping.

So one buys little 'iridium; pellets or dust for the final stage.

Buying rare earths, properly ground, then mixing perfectly is too expensive. Warehouse storage alone makes that impracticable.

 

At worse it becomes a cheap practice nib.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#3 Feanaaro

Feanaaro

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 325 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 October 2017 - 15:44

I'm afraid you just have to buy a nib, or a bunch of them, that you may like and try. There are many small differences between different nibs+feed combinations, so much so that I would believe it impossible to tell in advance with certainty which #5 nib will fit well within another #5 nib assembly.

#6 by comparison appear more standardized, but #5s are messy.



#4 Chrisrap

Chrisrap

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 48 posts
  • Location:New Jersey, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 05 October 2017 - 16:08

What size nibs do you have?  From my view, there are no nib size standards.  Each nib maked has their own.  #5 nibs are similar in size & shape but not exact.



#5 mitto

mitto

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,201 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 October 2017 - 16:10

The IPG nibs are not all the same size/shape. I have seen IPG nibs on vintage local (Pakistani) pison filled pens, on old Chinese pens as well on old button filled Taiwanese pens and all were different size and shape.
Khan M. Ilyas

#6 iruciperi

iruciperi

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 October 2017 - 16:37

The IPG nibs are not all the same size/shape. I have seen IPG nibs on vintage local (Pakistani) pison filled pens, on old Chinese pens as well on old button filled Taiwanese pens and all were different size and shape.

 

 

What size nibs do you have?  From my view, there are no nib size standards.  Each nib maked has their own.  #5 nibs are similar in size & shape but not exact.

 

 

I'm afraid you just have to buy a nib, or a bunch of them, that you may like and try. There are many small differences between different nibs+feed combinations, so much so that I would believe it impossible to tell in advance with certainty which #5 nib will fit well within another #5 nib assembly.

#6 by comparison appear more standardized, but #5s are messy.

 

 

Oh, I see. Then the situation is not that simple. I think I should get #5-size JOWO or BUCK steal nib and test. I will post the result after testing. 

 

Thanks a lot.



#7 iruciperi

iruciperi

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 October 2017 - 16:42

If there is any 'iridium' tipping, on the IPG nib, smooth it.

The tipping is standard, in I think Bock and JoWo and everyone else that buys the 'iridium' tipping made in Germany or the world uses the same company which makes the tipping.

 

It's the care factory grinding of the nib that makes the nib smooth or not. Modern smooth tipping was perfected in WW2. Before that it was lumpy and chunks fell off.

In the 20-30's much engineering was spent trying to make the cheapest long wearing tipping possible, often changing from one year to the next with in the same company. Spend a dollar to save a penny. There is a good article on that somewhere.

 

Over a few decades since the war, a standard of long lasting 'iridium' compounds would have developed, that I doubt improved. Not enough to waste an engineer on. Cheap and good enough.....none ever went best of all. 'Iridium compounds', have always been more expensive than gold. Iridium is not much used any more, too scarce, just here and there a few inches of asteroid dust....wasn't used in the '30's as I remember reading. Other rare earths took it's place. 

The question was how can I make a good tipping cheap.....or a good cheap tipping.

So one buys little 'iridium; pellets or dust for the final stage.

Buying rare earths, properly ground, then mixing perfectly is too expensive. Warehouse storage alone makes that impracticable.

 

At worse it becomes a cheap practice nib.

 

Thanks a lot! Indeed I was trying to change it to a gold nib, because I prefer softer nibs.

 

I didn't care of whether the nib really has "Iridium" as its tipping material. I think I should check it firstly. Thanks. Because I'm out of town now, I will come back with the result several days later. 



#8 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,551 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 05 October 2017 - 20:45

Gold is not necessary softer than steel....a nails a nail. I do have a 18K nail nibs that are as hard as any steel nail nib I have.....I do have a fabled Pelikan D nib, the nails nail.

 

Some folks I think have gotten gold semi-nail (like from a P-75 or modern semi-nail 400/600 nibs with out knowing it and think oh it's softer it's gold. They are compared to the 800 nail.

Could be it's semi-nail to the nail they are comparing it too.

 

I have a number of semi-vintage Pelikan regular flex nibs from the mid '90's, in both steel and gold that totally =.....there is no better, no softer.

I have '30-50's Osmia/Osmia-Faber-Castell steel and gold nibs that are = and grand.

I do now wish I'd not been such a gold snob, in I passed up a number of affordable Osmia steel nib pens because to the Gold Myth and refusal to believe my 'noobie' senses that the steel nib was as good as the gold until later. Gold had to be better :doh: .....nope. A good steel nib can be as good as a good gold nib.....accent on good.

And which flex the nib actually has.

 

 

Don't believe the Gold Myth BS.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#9 Phil_Dart

Phil_Dart

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 85 posts
  • Location:Somerset, England
  • Flag:

Posted 05 October 2017 - 21:44

By far and away the majority of modern IPG nibs conform to the same geometry as western nibs - Bock, and Jowo.

The term "Iridium Point Germany" stamped on them is a blatant lie in 99.9% of cases. There are only two manufacturers of pen kits worldwide who use anything other than IPG nibs, one being ourselves at Beaufort Ink in the UK, who use our own German made house nibs, the other being Dayacom in Taiwan, which whilst they are engraved IPG are actually also German. 

All the rest, whilst stamped IPG, in fact have never been any closer to Germany than Shanghai. It is an urban myth that the claim is because the tipping material is imported from Germany. It's simply not true - it is a less than precious metal compound made in the far east along with the rest of the nib. The wholesale price of the entire nib is around 15 cents,

And who is going to sue the Chinese for misleading information anyway?

The bottom line though, is that your custom pen is modern, and therefore it is more or less a foregone conclusion that once you've established the size of the nib, you will be able to swap it for a Bock or a Jowo. If you can show me a photo of the pen, I may even be able to supply a Bock in the correct housing to screw directly into you pen. If that isn't possible, you will almost certainly be able to swap a new nib into your existing housing.

I hope that helps


www.beaufortink.co.uk
Top quality nibs, ink and refills, pen kits, tools and supplies for discerning pen enthusiasts and makers.
Agents for Bock nibs.
Specialist supplies for kitless pens and custom pen makers.


#10 iruciperi

iruciperi

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 October 2017 - 06:05

Gold is not necessary softer than steel....a nails a nail. I do have a 18K nail nibs that are as hard as any steel nail nib I have.....I do have a fabled Pelikan D nib, the nails nail.

 

Some folks I think have gotten gold semi-nail (like from a P-75 or modern semi-nail 400/600 nibs with out knowing it and think oh it's softer it's gold. They are compared to the 800 nail.

Could be it's semi-nail to the nail they are comparing it too.

 

I have a number of semi-vintage Pelikan regular flex nibs from the mid '90's, in both steel and gold that totally =.....there is no better, no softer.

I have '30-50's Osmia/Osmia-Faber-Castell steel and gold nibs that are = and grand.

I do now wish I'd not been such a gold snob, in I passed up a number of affordable Osmia steel nib pens because to the Gold Myth and refusal to believe my 'noobie' senses that the steel nib was as good as the gold until later. Gold had to be better :doh: .....nope. A good steel nib can be as good as a good gold nib.....accent on good.

And which flex the nib actually has.

 

 

Don't believe the Gold Myth BS.

 

 

I know that gold nibs are not necessarily softer than steal nibs. I've heard many times and I had a Noodler's Konrad with flexible steal nib. But in my case, the steal IPG nib of my pen is quite rigid, and there is no modern soft steal nib available. And some gold nibs made by JOWO and BOCK are softer than the steal nib in my pen. 

 

So I'm planning to buy a softer gold nib to replace the rigid nib in my pen. If you know modern steal nib as soft as modern soft gold nibs, such as Visconti 14k gold nibs, please let me know where I can get it. Vintage nibs are out of my consideration in this case because, you know, even the modern nibs have no guarantee to fit the feed of my pen. 

 

I'm sorry it may sound like I'm afraid of you. I'm not afraid of you at all. If it sounds like, It's just because of lack of my English communication skills. Thank you for your concerning.



#11 iruciperi

iruciperi

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 October 2017 - 08:09

By far and away the majority of modern IPG nibs conform to the same geometry as western nibs - Bock, and Jowo.

The term "Iridium Point Germany" stamped on them is a blatant lie in 99.9% of cases. There are only two manufacturers of pen kits worldwide who use anything other than IPG nibs, one being ourselves at Beaufort Ink in the UK, who use our own German made house nibs, the other being Dayacom in Taiwan, which whilst they are engraved IPG are actually also German. 

All the rest, whilst stamped IPG, in fact have never been any closer to Germany than Shanghai. It is an urban myth that the claim is because the tipping material is imported from Germany. It's simply not true - it is a less than precious metal compound made in the far east along with the rest of the nib. The wholesale price of the entire nib is around 15 cents,

And who is going to sue the Chinese for misleading information anyway?

The bottom line though, is that your custom pen is modern, and therefore it is more or less a foregone conclusion that once you've established the size of the nib, you will be able to swap it for a Bock or a Jowo. If you can show me a photo of the pen, I may even be able to supply a Bock in the correct housing to screw directly into you pen. If that isn't possible, you will almost certainly be able to swap a new nib into your existing housing.

I hope that helps

 

 

I can't give you the measurements, because I'm in vacation now, but I can show you the pics.

 

fpn_1507277198__nib_1.png

fpn_1507277237__nib_2.png

 

The paper below is the Rhodia Dotpad, which has 5mm-grid. 



#12 Phil_Dart

Phil_Dart

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 85 posts
  • Location:Somerset, England
  • Flag:

Posted 06 October 2017 - 08:34

That is a size 5 nib, and it's in a standard "kit compatible" housing. If you choose your new nib from the right hand column on our webpage "Nib with kit compatible housing and feed" I guarantee it will screw straight into your pen as a direct replacement.
 

http://www.beauforti.../bocksize5.html
 

We have solid gold nibs to choose from as well as plated steel if that is what you fancy trying, and if we're sending it to South Korea, you'll only have to pay the Ex Vat price. You don't have to pay UK sales tax if you are buying from outside of the European Union.


Edited by Phil_Dart, 06 October 2017 - 08:39.

www.beaufortink.co.uk
Top quality nibs, ink and refills, pen kits, tools and supplies for discerning pen enthusiasts and makers.
Agents for Bock nibs.
Specialist supplies for kitless pens and custom pen makers.


#13 iruciperi

iruciperi

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 October 2017 - 08:45

That is a size 5 nib, and it's in a standard "kit compatible" housing. If you choose your new nib from the right hand column on our webpage "Nib with kit compatible housing and feed" I guarantee it will screw straight into your pen as a direct replacement.
 

http://www.beauforti.../bocksize5.html
 

We have solid gold nibs to choose from as well as plated steel if that is what you fancy trying, and if we're sending it to South Korea, you'll only have to pay the Ex Vat price. You don't have to pay UK sales tax if you are buying from outside of the European Union.

 

 

Okay. I will send you a message about it.



#14 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,551 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 06 October 2017 - 09:21

Thank you for the proper Update Phil......to live and learn often means opps....

 

Iruciperi............fear is not the proper word you are looking for.

 

Having spent time as a gold snob, can say there are steel nibs as good as good gold nibs for much less. There are of course cheap steel nibs.

There has always been cheap nibs......even the IPG nibs I have that were made in Germany, from the little school shop still has a case of nibs from back in the day when most wrote with fountain pens and folks wanted a cheaper nib replacement than in house: or Degussa, Rupp or Bock nibs.....

The German made IPG nibs were the Knox nibs of the day.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 06 October 2017 - 09:28.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 




Reply to this topic



  



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: iridium point germany, replacement



Sponsored Content




|