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New Noodler's Pen

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#41 eharriett

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 16:56

I have a waterman #2 extra fine wet noodle literally sitting on standby for this pen.

I've heard other people say they are doing something like this with Noodlers Pens.  What are you doing?  How are you doing it?  Do you have to use a feed as well?  Do you have to change out the insides as well?



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#42 EMQG

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 18:57

I've heard other people say they are doing something like this with Noodlers Pens.  What are you doing?  How are you doing it?  Do you have to use a feed as well?  Do you have to change out the insides as well?

Never done a nib swap before?

 

Okay, I'll explain this as best as I can.

 

With most (modern) pens, a nib swap is extremely simple. Most modern pens use a #5 or #6 nib made by Bock or Jowo. The nibs aren't the *exact* same size and shape, but they're very close. Bock and Jowo nibs can be bought as just a nib, or as a "nib unit"  which screws into the section (grip). Some other brands, such as Pelikan, TWSBI, and Aurora make their own nib units. TWSBI (and Pelikan, I believe) uses nibs made by Jowo (and Pelikan has Bock-made nibs, I believe) that they then manufacture feeds and nib unit "collars" for.

 

Nib units are very easy to swap in and out. Just buy a new one from the same brand, unscrew the old one, and screw in the new one!

 

Pens that don't use a nib unit make it a bit more difficult. Modern pens are typically a bit more structurally sound than vintage ones, so you can do what's called "pulling" the nib and feed. It's more or less what it sounds like. You place your thumb on the bottom of the feed, your finger on the base of the nib, and pull to remove them. Usually pretty easy. Nibs can also be pulled out of nib units, in case you wanted to fit a different brand's nib in (If you have a Bock nib you like, but you want it in a Jowo-based pen).

 

Vintage pens make it a bit more difficult. They're more fragile, and nibs and feeds were typically wedged into the section with quite a bit of force. They're a very tight fit. So what you have to do is to take the section out, support the section in a knockout block, and use a "punch" (a thin, sometimes hollow rod) and a hammer to knock the nib and feed out. You've also got to tape the nib and feed together to prevent the feed from coming out first (it can damage the nib), tape the section up and mark where the nib's edges are so it can be reinserted properly, and heat the section with dry heat to make it less fragile.

 

So this Noodler's safety is an odd case, because it's a modern pen with a vintage design, but not a typical vintage design. This is more or less how a typical vintage section looks when you're knocking a nib and feed out. You probably already know what a modern pen's insides look like, so I won't bother showing you.

 

However, this isn't a design typical of any era. Safeties are a very, very unusual design, and they're very complicated. Here is where Nathan (Noodler's owner) introduces this pen in a video. He pretty quickly starts disassembling it, and at about the 14 minute mark he pulls the (I don't actually know the proper term for it, forgive me for using a made-up one) shaft out of the pen. Pause it as he does, and you can see what it looks like. Pretty much just like a miniature pen. So what you've gotta do is heat it up (I'll explain how in a sec), pull the nib and feed (don't forget to wrap tape around the "section" of the shaft first, and use a thin marker to mark where the edges of the nib are), and then reinsert it with a different, properly sized nib. Making sure to line it up correctly and heat the "section" before reinsertion, of course.

 

The heat is very important because of a particular property of ebonite (the material of which the pen is made). Ebonite is very resistant to heat, especially compared to other materials pens are made of, like celluloid. Ebonite can be heated very hot (using DRY heat) without any damage to it, and can be fairly easily moulded into a new shape while hot. It'll then cool, and stay that way. It's also less fragile when hot. Then, if you ever want to return the ebonite to its original shape, you just reheat it, and it magically returns to it! I've literally done this with small ebonite pins before, bent them when hot, then heated them back up to straighten them out. Takes absolutely no effort. Super cool.

 

So you heat it to make it less likely to crack and to make sure that any minute changes to its shape can be reversed easily in the future. Make sense?

 

To heat it, you want to take a hairdryer and blow on the part you're heating. Rotate the part you're heating around, so that the heat is evenly distributed and one part isn't warmer than another. Every few seconds, test it against your cheek. With black ebonite like this (I'm not sure about the heat tolerances of other kinds of ebonite) let it get hot enough that you don't want to hold it there for more than a second or two. Don't let celluloid get that hot, and like I said, I don't know about red, blue, pink, green, brown, etc ebonite.

 

That's how you swap a nib in a Noodler's safety!

 

Oh, by the way: You don't use a knockout block with a safety because there's no hole in the back of the shaft's "section". Well, there is in some, but... it's weird. I don't have my Noodler's one yet, so I can't say exactly how it's made, but I know that a knockout block won't work with it.

 

All of that make sense? Ask questions!

 

I highly recommend watching that whole video, by the way


Edited by EMQG, 06 December 2017 - 19:07.


#43 eharriett

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 19:51

Thank you.  That helped me understand it.  It looks like it may be a little more complicated than I'd be ready to ry on a first go around.  However, should you (or someone else reading this) decide to make a video of how you're doing it, it may encourage me to try something like that.



#44 Honeybadgers

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 19:53

 

Same one you had on the Lecai?

 

 

Pure Pens is sold out - Pen Chalet will have them either this week or Monday of next week. Not sure if Pure Pens will ever have more, you should contact them.

 

Similar, but the lecai is keeping its noodle!



#45 EMQG

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 20:52

Thank you.  That helped me understand it.  It looks like it may be a little more complicated than I'd be ready to ry on a first go around.  However, should you (or someone else reading this) decide to make a video of how you're doing it, it may encourage me to try something like that.

This is my blog. There's only a couple posts, one should show you how to use tape on the section to line up the nib. I mark both edges of the nib, and where the slit is (not really necessary, it's just habit).

 

The heat is pretty simple and ebonite pens are a good place to learn, since heat won't do much damage. It's one of those seconds to learn, years to master type things. Anyone can do it, but Francis Goosens and Richard Binder can sure as (bleep) do it better than either of us can.

 

Taping a nib and feed together is as simple as it sounds. Get tape and wrap it around the nib and feed a couple times. Not really necessary in this situation I guess, since you're gripping them both.

 

Pulling them out is simple. You grab 'em and pull. Sticking them back in is just as simple. Line it up and push it in. If it's not in right, you can always try again.

 

 

 

 

Similar, but the lecai is keeping its noodle!

Where're you getting all these things?



#46 EMQG

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 20:58

Thank you.  That helped me understand it.  It looks like it may be a little more complicated than I'd be ready to ry on a first go around.  However, should you (or someone else reading this) decide to make a video of how you're doing it, it may encourage me to try something like that.

Oh, and by the way - me or plenty of other people here would be happy to fit a different nib into your pen. Just pay for the nib and shipping!



#47 Honeybadgers

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 22:10

This is my blog. There's only a couple posts, one should show you how to use tape on the section to line up the nib. I mark both edges of the nib, and where the slit is (not really necessary, it's just habit).

 

The heat is pretty simple and ebonite pens are a good place to learn, since heat won't do much damage. It's one of those seconds to learn, years to master type things. Anyone can do it, but Francis Goosens and Richard Binder can sure as (bleep) do it better than either of us can.

 

Taping a nib and feed together is as simple as it sounds. Get tape and wrap it around the nib and feed a couple times. Not really necessary in this situation I guess, since you're gripping them both.

 

Pulling them out is simple. You grab 'em and pull. Sticking them back in is just as simple. Line it up and push it in. If it's not in right, you can always try again.

 

 

 

Where're you getting all these things?

 

Lucky find on Etsy, grabbed a 52 1/2 V missing a cap with an ideal nib, listed as "flexible" and nothing else.

 

Was a needlepoint wet noodle.



#48 Honeybadgers

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 22:13

Thank you.  That helped me understand it.  It looks like it may be a little more complicated than I'd be ready to ry on a first go around.  However, should you (or someone else reading this) decide to make a video of how you're doing it, it may encourage me to try something like that.

 

 

His information made it sound more daunting than it is.

 

Nib swaps are generally barely more involved than using a paper towel to pull the nib and feed out and put the new nib in (make sure the converter or cartridge isn't in). Only a few nibs are actually less compatible than standard (the noodlers flex nib is one of them) everything else is pretty much pull and swap. Don't mess around with a $600 visconti as your first one in case you do something weird, but basically any sub-40 pen you should know how to remove the nib anyways just for thorough cleaning.

 

Most pens don't have removable units. Even those that do, the nib and feeds also pull straight out. Pretty much every feed/nib in existence is removed by simply pulling with a firm grip on the top and bottom of the nib and feed.

 

Nib swaps on vintage pens can be a bear (like he said they JAMMED those buggers in there) but I've never seen a modern pen that required a knockout block. 

 

If you want a nib-grip to make pulling nibs easy (it's just a piece of rubber inner tube) for swapping or cleaning send me a PM, paypal me $3 for shipping and I'll mail you a couple.


Edited by Honeybadgers, 06 December 2017 - 22:19.


#49 eharriett

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 00:41

Oh, and by the way - me or plenty of other people here would be happy to fit a different nib into your pen. Just pay for the nib and shipping!

Checking the blog out now. 

 

I plan on getting my hands on a couple of the pens (assuming the stock lasts).  I may take you up on that offer.

 

Thank you for the education.



#50 EMQG

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 15:44

 

Lucky find on Etsy, grabbed a 52 1/2 V missing a cap with an ideal nib, listed as "flexible" and nothing else.

 

Was a needlepoint wet noodle.

Ooh, never really looked on Etsy. You find good deals there often?

 

 

 

His information made it sound more daunting than it is.

 

Nib swaps are generally barely more involved than using a paper towel to pull the nib and feed out and put the new nib in (make sure the converter or cartridge isn't in). Only a few nibs are actually less compatible than standard (the noodlers flex nib is one of them) everything else is pretty much pull and swap. Don't mess around with a $600 visconti as your first one in case you do something weird, but basically any sub-40 pen you should know how to remove the nib anyways just for thorough cleaning.

 

Most pens don't have removable units. Even those that do, the nib and feeds also pull straight out. Pretty much every feed/nib in existence is removed by simply pulling with a firm grip on the top and bottom of the nib and feed.

 

Nib swaps on vintage pens can be a bear (like he said they JAMMED those buggers in there) but I've never seen a modern pen that required a knockout block. 

 

If you want a nib-grip to make pulling nibs easy (it's just a piece of rubber inner tube) for swapping or cleaning send me a PM, paypal me $3 for shipping and I'll mail you a couple.

Yeah, I went into way too much detail for a beginner. That's my bad. Didn't need to go into knockout blocks.

 

I would still stand by my advice of using heat and tape on the section, just for safety's sake. Doesn't hurt, and it's not all that difficult. If they're concerned about how much heat to use, don't use very much. Like you said, it'd probably be fine with no heat - but ebonite doesn't lose anything when it's heated, so it's just a good precautionary/preservationist measure.

 

The rubber tube advice is solid. You can also use a rubber potholder/lid-gripper, or just about anything you can use to gain grip that isn't sandpaper.

 

 

 

Checking the blog out now. 

 

I plan on getting my hands on a couple of the pens (assuming the stock lasts).  I may take you up on that offer.

 

Thank you for the education.

Cool! Lemme know! :D



#51 Uncial

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 16:03

First Impressions (very quickly)

 

Mine arrived today and it's, well....eh, quite a lot bigger than I expected. It doesn't post securely at all. It makes a mess if you overfill it, which is very easy to do. One pipette squeeze is enough. The mechanism feels really nice; very smooth and no leaks once the nib is out and no burping either. The nib on mine was clearly auditioning for the main role in a horror movie but after an extended period of smoothing I can report that it produces a very nice xxf line that you can push out to a medium. It's not a flexible nib though but neither is it firm. It's a little like having a steel nib that feels a little like a soft gold nib. It's a little different from the normal Noodler's nibs (aside from being smaller). The clip doesn't sit well with the design of the pen; in fact, it probably makes an interesting pen look a bit ugly.

 

If these are produced in red ripples at a later date I'd be seriously tempted to pick up another one but the really very unpleasant scratchiness of the nib is something I'd like to see addressed before parting with my cash again. All in all though it's quite an interesting pen at a good price point but I do dislike having to smooth out my own nibs. If I can do it at home I don't think it's unreasonable to expect it to be done before I receive it.



#52 eharriett

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 16:08

I am still waiting for Pen Chalet to release them, so I don't have my hands on one yet.

 

As far as scratchiness: do you think that is just a flaw in the process (I know Noodlers is famous for having a few issues here and there when they first come out but they get better after their processes get better) or do you think you just got one that needed a bit more work?  Did you soak it before using?



#53 Uncial

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 19:28

I may have been unlucky and hopefully that is the case. Only time and further reports from others will tell.



#54 eharriett

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Posted 11 December 2017 - 19:40

Waaaahh!  Pen Chalet still doesn't have it yet!!  Been checking the site every couple of hours!!



#55 EMQG

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 09:50

The lack of secure posting is disheartening - I'd think Nathan woulda taken that into account, given how he's sold this pen as a utilitarian tool. Glad it's smooth and not leaky, though.

 

In his video, he told us it'd have the same nib as a Nib Creaper. If so, it shouldn't be putting down a XXF line, and it should be semiflexible. It should be a FM line. I'm thinking your tines might be too tight.

 

As for scratchiness... all pen companies have problems with scratchiness nowadays. It's just poor QC. Not a problem with Noodler's specifically. You're just as likely to get a scratchy Montblanc as you are a scratchy Noodler's.

 

 

First Impressions (very quickly)

 

Mine arrived today and it's, well....eh, quite a lot bigger than I expected. It doesn't post securely at all. It makes a mess if you overfill it, which is very easy to do. One pipette squeeze is enough. The mechanism feels really nice; very smooth and no leaks once the nib is out and no burping either. The nib on mine was clearly auditioning for the main role in a horror movie but after an extended period of smoothing I can report that it produces a very nice xxf line that you can push out to a medium. It's not a flexible nib though but neither is it firm. It's a little like having a steel nib that feels a little like a soft gold nib. It's a little different from the normal Noodler's nibs (aside from being smaller). The clip doesn't sit well with the design of the pen; in fact, it probably makes an interesting pen look a bit ugly.

 

If these are produced in red ripples at a later date I'd be seriously tempted to pick up another one but the really very unpleasant scratchiness of the nib is something I'd like to see addressed before parting with my cash again. All in all though it's quite an interesting pen at a good price point but I do dislike having to smooth out my own nibs. If I can do it at home I don't think it's unreasonable to expect it to be done before I receive it.

 

I am still waiting for Pen Chalet to release them, so I don't have my hands on one yet.

 

As far as scratchiness: do you think that is just a flaw in the process (I know Noodlers is famous for having a few issues here and there when they first come out but they get better after their processes get better) or do you think you just got one that needed a bit more work?  Did you soak it before using?



#56 eharriett

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 16:04

As far as posting them goes, my understanding is you are not supposed to ever post a safety pen, since the ink flows freely when the pen is capped. The cap becomes part of ink storage — you’d get ink on the back of the pen if you post it.

#57 EMQG

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 20:30

As far as posting them goes, my understanding is you are not supposed to ever post a safety pen, since the ink flows freely when the pen is capped. The cap becomes part of ink storage — you’d get ink on the back of the pen if you post it.

 

Nope! As a matter of fact, early Waterman safeties were thread-to-post! Most safeties post very securely on the knob on the back of the pen (talking about "Continental Safeties" such as Watermans or Montblancs, as opposed to "Boston Safeties" like the Noodler's or the Moore) and you could extend and retract the nib by twisting the cap while it was posted. I believe it was a safety measure for the nib. If the cap is posted while the nib is being retracted, it won't be crushed by the cap!

 

I'm not sure how the ink doesn't get all over the plug on the inside of the cap, then all over the back of the pen - but it doesn't. I'll bet someone has a good explanation.



#58 eharriett

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 20:32

OK then.  I just learned something!  Thanks.

 

Still recheckin stores every 30 minutes hoping to buy one :)



#59 EMQG

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 20:55

OK then.  I just learned something!  Thanks.

 

Still recheckin stores every 30 minutes hoping to buy one :)

I've already got mine on the way, but I still keep checking daily, just cuz I'm excited!

 

Mine should be here in a couple days. I'm in Oregon, they're on their way from San Francisco. Today's my birthday, I was sorta hoping I'd be getting a surprise birthday gift from myself.



#60 eharriett

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 20:58

I've already got mine on the way, but I still keep checking daily, just cuz I'm excited!

 

Mine should be here in a couple days. I'm in Oregon, they're on their way from San Francisco. Today's my birthday, I was sorta hoping I'd be getting a surprise birthday gift from myself.

Really?  Did you get it from a U.S. Distributor?  Who has it?  I'm getting tired of waiting for Pen Chalet I'm ready to go somewhere else.







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