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Custom-Made Sections For Using Osmiroid/easterbrook Nibs On Newton Pens

italic handwriting newton pens osmiroid nibs

6 replies to this topic

#1 dms525

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 00:12

I asked Shawn Newton to make sections that accept Osmiroid nibs for two of his pens that are already in my collection. The new sections are terrific. I have posted about this in detail in the general calligraphy forum. FYI, here's a link: http://www.fountainp...s/#entry3916133

 

Enjoy!

 

David



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#2 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:09

I was able to get an Osmiroid set of 6 nibs from England for my Esterbrooks. I also have an Osmiroid sac pen. It's very cheap feeling. But if one don't have an Esterbrook, will do the nibs justice.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#3 sidthecat

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 23:57

I can't say I have much love for Osmiroid nibs. Apart from interchangeability, what is the appeal over, say, a genuinely flexible nib for your expensive, custom-made pen?



#4 dms525

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 05:30

I can't say I have much love for Osmiroid nibs. Apart from interchangeability, what is the appeal over, say, a genuinely flexible nib for your expensive, custom-made pen?

 

"A genuinely flexible nib" is desirable for scripts such as Spencerian and Copperplate. The Osmiroid nibs i am using have Italic (chisel cut) points and are suited to italic, gothic, Foundational, Uncial and Carolingian scripts. Those are the ones I write.

 

David



#5 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 09:48

Sometimes, not often, I want to use an Italic nib....for drawing letters. I use them so seldom, I have to crack the book to see how to draw the letter.

 

""""italic, gothic, Foundational, Uncial and Carolingian scripts."""""""""" some very pretty scripts.

 

Occasionally I get to a museum exhibition where they show some of the documents on parchment from 1100-1300-1400.

There is some real  tidy handwriting, in various scripts, that considering how few could actually write, :puddle:  


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 16 September 2017 - 09:52.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#6 sidthecat

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 22:43

Those styles make for a very pretty page indeed. I have a couple of pens with broad or stub nibs, and flexibility can add to the writing experience.
The medieval scribe would have likely used a flexible quill, so it wouldn't be inappropriate to add a broad flex nib to your scriptorium.

#7 EMQG

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Posted 19 September 2017 - 06:02

I can't say I have much love for Osmiroid nibs. Apart from interchangeability, what is the appeal over, say, a genuinely flexible nib for your expensive, custom-made pen?

Osmiroids are italic nibs - made for stuff like Blackletter, rather than Spencerian.

 

Plus, it adds a bit of flair to normal writing with no extra effort. Much cheaper than most flex, too.





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