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Ink Flow Issues With Sailor 1911S. Prime Suspect:the Converter. What Do You Think?

sailor 1911 converter problems fp bureau of investigation

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9 replies to this topic

#1 lordofnumpties

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 18:22

Hello!

Based on the excellent advice I received on this forum, I purchased a Sailor 1911S and I've been enjoying it immensely. Its nib blew my mind, and the performance right out of the box was unbelievable. However, there is one minor problem that is bothering me, and I was wondering if someone else here has experienced the same and if there's a solution.

As the converter is down to its last mL or so of ink, the ink flow reduces and eventually stops. I have to twist the converter and push the remaining ink into the section and that restores the ink flow, as if the pen was freshly inked. This is extremely annoying because I (perhaps foolishly?) expect better of a pen this expensive; I have cheaper pens which can drain their converters of every single drop of ink without skipping even once. On a related note, when I was cleaning my Sailor, the converter just came apart once without the use of excessive force. I was able to reassemble it but again, I was shocked (but the ink flow problem was present pretty much from the beginning, long before the accidental disassembly of the converter happened).

I suspect something's wrong with the converter, but truly, what on earth is going on with this pen? Should I swap the converter? Is there another fix? Please advise. Thanks.


Edited by lordofnumpties, 04 August 2017 - 18:24.


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#2 DipIt

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 21:10

I have had a similar situation with the one and only 1911 that I have experience with. It is a very fine pen in every respect as long as I refill it before it is low on fuel. I did have a converter leak on me and like you disassembled it. I don't recall seeing a bead inside and I know some converters use such to prevent the last of the ink from hanging up at the piston. Those converters don't hold a lot of ink and are fairly narrow so maybe it is keeping the last of the ink away from the nib.

It is only one sample point but it sounds similar to your experience....really nice functioning pen otherwise. It works perfectly on cartridges.

#3 Driften

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 00:09

It's not just Sailor converters that do this. I have seen it with other brands as well. Like it was said a metal ball or keyboard spring can break up the surface tension in cases like this. 



#4 jar

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 12:33

Sounds normal for most any fountain pen.


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#5 lordofnumpties

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 13:28

Sounds normal for most any fountain pen.

Ahhh...looks like I'll have to buy more pens to verify that... 



#6 Innosint

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 18:40

Try adding a tiny bearing or glass bead into the converter.

 

This should help breaking up the air bubble build up.

 

You can also try ink with less surface tension (genearly, wetter ink) it should also help with flow issue.



#7 displacermoose

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:04

Sailor's converters are their weak spot. I find they work much better after adding the barest hint of silicon grease to the piston. Not necessary very often, just when they start to feel stiff and sticky. The glass bead idea is also a good one.

Yet another Sarah.


#8 mitto

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 16:42

...and so are Platinum converters. I have stopped using the Platinum piston converters. Instead, I use squeese converters that I make for my Platinums pens.
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#9 Bluey

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 16:58

Yup, Platinum converters are pants. They seize up frequently and require regular application of silicone grease.


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#10 DipIt

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 19:53

With my 1911, I just started refilling spent cartridges.....sooner or later, I will likely have a leak but it works well so far.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: sailor 1911, converter problems, fp bureau of investigation



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