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Shaded Writing With Esterbrook 9048 Nib


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#1 corgicoupe

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 00:21

I just acquired a beautiful Dubonnet Red Transitional J from Gary Weimer with aforementioned 9048 nib. This nib is supposed to be for "shaded writing" according to the nib listings. It does flex a bit with pressure, but I guess I need some verbal instruction about how to accomplish shaded writing. All suggestions and opinions appreciated. tia

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#2 Orpilorp

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 10:13

I may be wrong, but I've always thought that what Esterbrook then called shaded writing is what we now call italic writing.


Addendum: the 9048 nib (which I've never tried) is supposed to be equivalent to Esterbrook's 048 calligraphy nib, and that nib writes a very fine line which with slight pressure will broaden quite nicely.

Edited by Orpilorp, 26 June 2017 - 10:24.


#3 corgicoupe

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 13:21

Mine has the old format, and it does have "Flexible Nib" on the box rather than the "Shaded Writing" listed in the tables. I did replace the PR Dakota Red ink with Waterman Serenity Blue, and the flow is improved. I need to learn to flex the nib just a bit.



#4 pajaro

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 16:06

I have a 9048 nib.  It writes a very nice fine line that broadens with a good deal of pressure.  Back in the day people might have been used to how much pressure it took to flex this nib.  It takes more than light pressure.  I have often wondered if the pressure required to flex these nibs would lessen with use.  


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#5 ac12

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 21:09

I think there is a problem with interpreting what Esterbrook called "shading," when describing the nibs.

To some, it could mean line variation by flexing the nib.  The wider ink line at the flex is the "shading."

To others, it could mean shading as we understand it today, where there is a difference in darkness/shade of the ink in different parts of the writing.

 

I have a 9048 and feel that while it flexes, it needs a significant amount of pressure, for me to flex it.  Since I am a light writer, that amount of pressure is quite uncomfortable to write for any length of time.

 

As to HOW.

  • Change your grip slightly.  If you hold the pen in a "tripod grip," rotate your hand around the pen so that your index/pointing finger is at 12:00 on the pen.  This makes it easier to apply downward force onto the pen.
  • The method of flexing the nib should be to align the nib with the downstroke that you want to flex.  This is so that you flex BOTH tines evenly.  A diagonal flex will flex the trailing tine, much more than the leading tine.  Thus you could over stress the trailing tine.
  • For me flex writing with a fountain pen requires an upright/vertical style of writing, vs. my normally slanted writing, to keep the nib in alignment with the flexed downstroke.
  • To flex, push your HAND down, NOT your finger.  Your finger just needs to hold the pen in position.  The hand/arm muscles are larger than the smaller finger muscles, so it is easier to flex the nib.

This will all take practice, but it will come together.

 

gud luk


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#6 corgicoupe

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 00:52

Practice, practice, practice...

#7 gweimer1

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 01:26

Esterbrook flex nibs aren't overly flex.  I've never been able to get much out of them, but I'm also left-handed.  The nibs that I find really flex, are the "teardrop" nibs made during the war.  They are very different from the same nibs made later.

 

Note the difference between the two 9668 nibs.  The left one is pretty fluid.

 

fpn_1498613141__esterbrook_nibs_5.jpg



#8 pajaro

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 04:50

I think there is a problem with interpreting what Esterbrook called "shading," when describing the nibs.

To some, it could mean line variation by flexing the nib.  The wider ink line at the flex is the "shading."

To others, it could mean shading as we understand it today, where there is a difference in darkness/shade of the ink in different parts of the writing.

 

I have a 9048 and feel that while it flexes, it needs a significant amount of pressure, for me to flex it.  Since I am a light writer, that amount of pressure is quite uncomfortable to write for any length of time.

 

As to HOW.

  • Change your grip slightly.  If you hold the pen in a "tripod grip," rotate your hand around the pen so that your index/pointing finger is at 12:00 on the pen.  This makes it easier to apply downward force onto the pen.
  • The method of flexing the nib should be to align the nib with the downstroke that you want to flex.  This is so that you flex BOTH tines evenly.  A diagonal flex will flex the trailing tine, much more than the leading tine.  Thus you could over stress the trailing tine.
  • For me flex writing with a fountain pen requires an upright/vertical style of writing, vs. my normally slanted writing, to keep the nib in alignment with the flexed downstroke.
  • To flex, push your HAND down, NOT your finger.  Your finger just needs to hold the pen in position.  The hand/arm muscles are larger than the smaller finger muscles, so it is easier to flex the nib.

This will all take practice, but it will come together.

 

gud luk

 

I am with you about the pressure.  I am left handed, and I have tried to write flexibly with several different flexible nibs.  All I have achieved is to convince myself that I might not be able to walk and chew gum at the same time.  For reasons of personal pride I am not testing that.


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#9 ac12

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 02:14

 

 

I am with you about the pressure.  I am left handed, and I have tried to write flexibly with several different flexible nibs.  All I have achieved is to convince myself that I might not be able to walk and chew gum at the same time.  For reasons of personal pride I am not testing that.

 

I have given up on flex writing with a fountain pen.

When I want to do flex writing, I take out my dip pens.  Much LESS pressure to flex the nib, so it is easier to do flex writing.


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