Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies







Photo

Dragonfly Wing Pattern


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Drawing61

Drawing61

    Isle of Innisfree

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts
  • Location:United States
  • Flag:

Posted 21 May 2017 - 23:28

Hi, can someone tell me a little more about this technique: seirei-nuri-maki-e? Known as dragonfly wing pattern invented in Shizuoka in the Taisho era which I guess explains its Art Deco look. This is the extent of my scanty research. Any information much appreciated.

Attached Images

  • IMG_3036a.jpg
  • IMG_3039a.jpg

Love all, trust a few, do harm to none. Shakespeare


Sponsored Content

#2 Algester

Algester

    (´Д⊂ヽ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,726 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 24 May 2017 - 07:56

even my google-fu has been lacking well let's just say Taishou-era (1912-1926 WW1-Sino-Japanese conflict technically WW2) togidashi technique
as it is a togidashi technique the lines are formed by having been "pre-coated" with Urushi which is then sprinkled with gold powder and I think this type of technique is only seen on pens or small cylindrical containers but beg to correct me as I'm no Urushi and Maki-e expert

the video above teaches about the Hira Makie steps
as for the Pilot pen in question
FK-5MP-SR(ペン種)
研出平蒔絵 蜻蛉(蜻蛉塗)

Edited by Algester, 24 May 2017 - 10:42.


#3 peerless1

peerless1

    Antique

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,709 posts

Posted 24 May 2017 - 11:14

Edison Pens provides the following video.


stan

Formerly Ryojusen Pens
The oldest and largest buyer and seller of vintage Japanese pens in America.


Member: Pen Collectors of America & Fuente, THE Japanese Pen Collectors Club


#4 Drawing61

Drawing61

    Isle of Innisfree

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts
  • Location:United States
  • Flag:

Posted 24 May 2017 - 14:40

Thank you very much for the information.


Love all, trust a few, do harm to none. Shakespeare


#5 Bounce792

Bounce792

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 299 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 24 May 2017 - 18:49

even my google-fu has been lacking well let's just say Taishou-era (1912-1926 WW1-Sino-Japanese conflict technically WW2) togidashi technique
 

Even by the most generous start date of the 2nd Sino-Japanese War (1931 and the Mukden Incident), the Taisho Emperor and his reign were never involved with it.  The Second World War started in 1939, well past the death of the Taisho Emperor and well into the reign of his son, the Showa Emperor.

 

I know little about the maki-e and urushi processes.  However, the Taisho period was the most liberal period of the Japanese Empire with a general tolerance of many creative experiments.  This is, of course, within the context of a generally conservative society but it was the only period in which democratic rule was a brief reality.  So, there was a promotion of the arts which would not be seen until after the American Occupation ended.  I would say, historically speaking, that specific technique would be one of those cultivated during the Taisho period but which lost popularity afterwards.


round-letter-exc.png


#6 Algester

Algester

    (´Д⊂ヽ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,726 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 25 May 2017 - 03:57

Even by the most generous start date of the 2nd Sino-Japanese War (1931 and the Mukden Incident), the Taisho Emperor and his reign were never involved with it.  The Second World War started in 1939, well past the death of the Taisho Emperor and well into the reign of his son, the Showa Emperor.
 
I know little about the maki-e and urushi processes.  However, the Taisho period was the most liberal period of the Japanese Empire with a general tolerance of many creative experiments.  This is, of course, within the context of a generally conservative society but it was the only period in which democratic rule was a brief reality.  So, there was a promotion of the arts which would not be seen until after the American Occupation ended.  I would say, historically speaking, that specific technique would be one of those cultivated during the Taisho period but which lost popularity afterwards.

hmm interesting but Taishou era would still be covered in WW1... hmm my datings could be very off...

#7 Drawing61

Drawing61

    Isle of Innisfree

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts
  • Location:United States
  • Flag:

Posted 25 May 2017 - 04:37

Thanks very much. I assume from the videos that the pattern is achieved by floating urishi on water. Am I wrong?  Also is this a currently used technique?


Love all, trust a few, do harm to none. Shakespeare







Sponsored Content




|