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Osmiroid 65 Clip Removal?

osmiroid

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4 replies to this topic

#1 Midx

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 08:17

Hey all,

 

Can anyone tell me how (or even if it's possible) to remove the clip on an Osmiroid 65??

 

Cheers,

Chris.



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#2 PaulS

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 12:33

​yes, absolutely not doubt they can be removed  -  all you need is a hacksaw. :D

 

flippancy aside, I personally wouldn't bother  .............   having peered up the inside of the cap, I could be wrong, but it does appear that the black plastic domed cap jewel may well be put in place originally with some sort of plastic adhesive, such that removal is virtually impossible, without breaking the cap.   These are cheap pens  -  the plastic shrink and the nibs lack quality. 

 

You don't explain why you want to remove the clip, but this is an inexpensive pen, and it's probably a lot easier to buy a new 65 rather than spend time experimenting how to remove the clip.

 

Hope you won't think my comment too derogatory, but I really cannot bring myself to like this pen.


Edited by PaulS, 20 May 2017 - 12:34.


#3 Midx

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 13:17

Thanks Paul for the reply!

This was one of two cheapo pens I bought to practice on, as I start down the long road of pen restoration and I wanted to remove the clip before attempting to tackle restoring the body. I was hoping to try and sell it again afterwards (assuming I don't bog it up completely, lol), even though it won't be for much, 

 

It's a shame if the clip can't be removed, but not the end of the world.

 

Cheers,

Chris.



#4 PaulS

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 15:21

Appreciate that you've spent money on the pen - hopefully not too much - but if you so choose there is an opportunity here for you to use this example to learn how the cap jewel is in fact attached.                 My comments weren't based on experience, but were rather more a sort of half educated guess, and could in fact be wrong.       Of course if you do cut the jewel away to see for yourself then the pen is ruined, unless you have a spare cap, but at least when next this question is asked you will be able to say with certainty what the situation is. 

This cutting into a pen, or similar act of sawing some part in half to expose a cross section, is a common way that a lot of repairers have learned how some pens come apart and work - it does tend to wreck the pen, often, but keeps you in spares for a while - although wouldn't recommend it on quality pens or those that are in good nick.

 

It's the plastics with these Osmiroids that can give problems so often  -  the barrels can distort and lose their straightness - the caps shrink and no longer screw down properly onto the barrel - plus the nibs mostly lack smoothness, and are either steel or brass plated only. 

If you use the hair dryer, you'll find that the nib units unscrew - which was a plus for this range, but possibly the only plus, and if your pen hasn't been used for many years you will probably need the hair dryer to help with removing the section too.        There isn't much to 'bog up' on these things  -  simple lever pens - but if the body shows signs of damage or wear then I just can't see the point of bothering.         

I remember using them at school, and didn't like them then.

 

I've really no idea as to selling Osmiroids on ebay etc., but wouldn't have thought their down market image and low values warranted the time or expense involved - but famous last words. :)


Edited by PaulS, 20 May 2017 - 15:23.


#5 TerryB

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 15:26

hello Mint

I am probably a little late responding to this. I would agree with PaulS on the clip removal having just restored a Osmiroid 65, that i brought on Ebay as a spares or repairs lot, back to working condition. I was lucky that the clip was in good condition and I was only going to remove it to polish out scratches. Tried a little heat and couldn't move it with my patent jewel remover so left well enough alone.

 

As PaulS says the plastic on these pens is prone to shrinkage and the barrels can assume a banana shape. I managed to strajghten mine with a little very careful heat from a hairdryer heating it until I could hold it against my lip for a few seconds and then bending it back to shape with finger power. Its not perfect but you would have to look hard to tell its not.

 

The nib unscrews from the section, and the section unscrews from the barrel and again PaulS advice on a little heat is spot on. There is plenty of advice on here for the rest of the work needed and the only problem I have is the cap band protrudes from the cap slightly due to aforementioned shrinkage. Now looking up swaging techniques!

 

I brought a new medium italic nib for my pen as I wanted it to be  replica of my very first fountain pen (i think PaulS and I must be of  similar vintage) i had a problem with ink blotting that I solved by smearing the threads on the nib with a tiny amount of silicone grease and tightening it as hard as I dared.

 

The pen is a very smooth writer and I enjoy using it

 

Terry







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