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The Kinds Of Pens They Used In Meteora


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Leonil

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 19:48

I recently visited Meteora in Greece, where there are three monasteries built ontop of some mountains.

 

In one of the museums, there sits a collection of nibs, pens, pencils and basically the items used by a guy called Sofianos who catalogued the place's archives. I was told that the nibs are all gold, plated in something - perhaps silver - not sure.

 

Thought you guys may enjoy the quick pic I snapped up of the display.

 

L1004987.jpg


Edited by Leonil, 29 April 2017 - 19:49.


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#2 rwilsonedn

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 18:11

Fascinating! This is an interesting data point for the question of when dip pens went out of use ...

ron



#3 antoniosz

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 23:56

If these are dip pens that this person was using (which I dont doubt)  they dont tell us what they were using at Meteora. His work is rather recent (last 30-40 years).  In general dip pens were much more widely used in Greece in early 20th century than fountain pens.


Edited by antoniosz, 04 May 2017 - 23:57.


#4 Leonil

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 07:20

All I know is that this is what they used to archive the documents for the last half century.

 

The curators there told me something along the lines that all the "monk" work was painstakingly slow leaving me to believe that all the bibles and writing was done with some kind of calligraphy pen - and considering fountain pens are relatively "new" to the monastery, I would safely assume that almost all the writing done in the 1800s and earlier was done with dip pens...

 

As for specifics, the photo is as specific as I can get it.



#5 FountainPenGuru

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Posted 21 January 2018 - 03:59

This thread makes me ask the question regarding what type of pens that the monks are using in Agios Oros (Holy Mountain) in northeastern Greece?

#6 AAAndrew

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 21:24

Fascinating! This is an interesting data point for the question of when dip pens went out of use ...

ron

 

Wait. They've gone out of use?? And nobody bothered to tell me??  :o

 

What do I do with all of these dip pens? Oh, man. Next thing you know, you'll tell me my quill-cutting skills are obsolete as well. 

 

At least I know that buggy whip wrapping knowledge will always be needed.    :P

 

Seriously, though. It's hard to see, but it looks like a box of pretty standard dip pens (between the two inkwells). Most likely steel (gold pens don't come in boxes of multiples like that), maybe with a "silverine" kind of finish (a silver alloy). Writing with dip pens can be fairly meditative, especially if you're writing a decorative script. It can take a long time, but it gives you time to really think about what you're writing. (or, in my case, space out and think about what you're having for dinner tonight and then write the wrong letters, which is why I'm not a professional calligrapher)

 

Andrew

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