Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Book Signing Pen & Ink Recommendations

baystate blue twsbi 580 plaisir pilot urban visconti van gogh platinum 3776 metropolitan

  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#1 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 March 2017 - 17:44

Do you have any pen and ink recommendations for book signings?

 

My book of poetry just came out, and I've done two books signings with my Platinum Plaisir (fine) and Noodler's Baystate Blue. It actually worked out great, but I'd like to try out some other colors and would like to use some nicer pens. I'm a fairly new fountain pen collector, and I'm just starting to experiment with nicer pens.

 

About my experience with the Plaisir/Baystate combo: I loved the bright color, it dried quickly (even though it's not supposed to be fast drying), and didn't smear. The Plaisir did fine, but being a cheaper pen, it writes scratchy. I do have some nicer pens, but I was worried the Baystate Blue would stain the pen (so I didn't have to be concerned if it stained the inexpensive Plaisir).

 

Here are the other pens I have:

 

TWSBI 580AL (M) - Love this pen---ink doesn't dry out in pen if I leave it in a long time, but I think the M nib might be too broad for book signings, and I'm afraid it would be prone to smear/not dry quickly enough.

Pilot Urban Premium (M) - Same feelings as about the TWSBI.

Noodler's Ahab, Konrad flex, Konrad flex Essex acrylic: I like the Ahab and Flex acrylic, but they are prone to leaking at the nibs and sometimes putting out too much ink. Not happy with the Essex--not reliable, leaks, inconsistent look on paper.

Platinum Plaisir (F) - Doesn't dry out in pen, not afraid it will get stained or stolen---but it's scratchy to write with.

Pilot Metropolitans (F & M) - Pretty pens, but dry out quickly, nibs get damaged easily, and the writing scratchiness is inconsistent.

 

I went a little crazy on eBay and just got these pens---but I'm nervous about what inks to use in them.

Visconti Van Gogh Starry Night - M

Platinum Chartres 3776 - F

 

What do you recommend? What types of ink should I look for (dries quickly, water resistant?)? I liked the look of Baystate Blue---but is it safe to use in more expensive pens? I also tend to like purples and teal/turquoise.

 

Nib size? Are there be other types of fountain pens I should consider?

 

Thanks!



Sponsored Content

#2 sandy101

sandy101

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,754 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 March 2017 - 19:54

The Platinum #3776 is a lovely pen, but I think you might want to go for the medium, rather than the fine nib. The Platinum inks behave well enough - so I don't think you will have much of a problem with them. The Slip & Seal system works well. The blue-black ink has iron gall in it, so it may prove to be rather resilient to water. 

 

I have a Parker Urban (ball point) and its the most unbalanced pen in my collection. Maybe they've changed since I bought one. 

 

Another alternative might be to use the humble Parker jotter - yes, it's a ball point, but the ink will dry quickly, won't smear and leave a nice clean line - and refills are easy and clean to change.  



#3 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,044 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 21 March 2017 - 20:19

If and when...the day comes, I will use a M or B....and in I already have them an Oblique '50's-60's semi-flex nibs....those Vintage German pens are stubs besides the tad of flex.

IMO modern oblique is for folks with left eye dominance or left handers, in they have little line variation compared to the Vintage German ones.

 

I get a lot of flair.

F is way too narrow IMO. Just write a tad wider. An M is not really that wide at all, and is not as slapdash as a B could be.

Just don't use Pelikan 4001 Royal Blue, it fades.

 

What Continent are you on; we can guide you to easier inks to obtain. In Europe, Noodlers is hard to come by.....often not quick drying, though Noodler fans will tell which ones are.

 

MB is not as expensive as it seems, in there is a lot of ink in that classic bottle, 60cl. You do want the bottle...sooner or later. They have a nice Royal Blue.....Toffee a nice light brown would do. A bit upbeat.

 

 

PS you can always hold the book open for 7-8 seconds, in you are not being paid for how fast you sign and hand the book out. Contact in those few seconds is what you want to achieve. Contact is what the buyer wants too.

 

You can match the book cover, or the inner cover. There will be an ink that matches it and drys fast.

 

Congratulations on publishing.

I always through poetry too hard....

 

I'm writing a City Slicker Western Saga. Closing in on the last chapter and the massive cutting.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#4 cattar

cattar

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • Location:PNW

Posted 21 March 2017 - 21:02

Perhaps a Plaisir with M nib.

It will feel smoother than the F nib, and you won't worry about the pen.

 

 

Some purples and teals/turquoises fade.
For a bright blue, water resistant, perhaps Sailor Jentle blue or Pilot Blue


Edited by cattar, 21 March 2017 - 23:11.


#5 Cyber6

Cyber6

    Extremely AWESOME !!!

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,424 posts
  • Location:..back in TORONTO!!
  • Flag:

Posted 21 March 2017 - 21:15

Not that I am famous or anything...   BUT.. If the day comes where I need to sign my name.... I would use a a BB or a Broad Stub...  a Flex will be lovely .. Bottom line, something that will make my signature POP out of the paper...   :lol:  :lol:

 

(Assuming regular book paper.. and not glossy paper)

 

 

Inks.. If it is a Murder Mystery... I would go for BLOOD RED....  A Poetry book... I can go with Bright Blue/Purple/Orange/Green...  ;)

 

 

 

C. 


fpn_1481652911__bauerinkslogo03.jpg
**** BauerInks.ca ****

**** MORE.... Robert Oster Signature INKS ****

**** NICK STEWART - KWZI INKs TEST ****

"The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it's the illusion of knowledge." -Stephen Hawking,


#6 Mr.Rene

Mr.Rene

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,495 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 March 2017 - 21:46

About ink... Keep away from Baystate Blue.. This ink stains almost everything... :gaah: 



#7 ac12

ac12

    Museum Piece

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,504 posts
  • Location:San Francisco Bay Area, California, USA - SFO
  • Flag:

Posted 21 March 2017 - 22:45

CRUM

 

I hit a key by accident and lost my entire post  :angry:

 

Paper.

What is the paper of the page you will be signing on?

  • Some papers will BLOT a fountain pen.  Some inks will make this worse.
  • Some papers will be the opposite and the fountain pen ink will take forever to dry.  A 'sharpie' may be the best tool for this kind of paper.
  • In general, finer nib pens are more sensitive to the texture of the paper.  This is why a F nib will feel scratchy whereas a M nib will feel just fine, when writing on the same paper.

Pen

  • First, you want a RELIABLE pen.
    • This also means that you do NOT want a pen that might drip/drool ink onto the book.  IMHO, this mean NOT a Noodler's pen, or any pen that you have had dripping/drooling problems with.
  • See above problem with fine nib pens and paper.
  • You want the ink line to be easily visible.  That usually means a WIDE enough ink line that the customer can easily see, not a spider web thin XF ink line.
  • Comparing nibs, a Pilot M nib is like a TWSBI/Pelikan F nib.  Generally, the Japanese nibs are finer than the western nibs.
  • A stub or CI nib might be nice, but could also be difficult and slower to write with.  Depends on how familiar you are with them.  You also have to write larger with them.
  • Taking from Cyber, I might use a flex dip pen, but that is probably impractical.  And if someone bumps the table hard, a spilled bottle of ink will be MESSY.
  • Personally, I would also NOT use an EXPENSIVE pen.  Too many strangers, and the "'crow effect" could happen.  Oooo nice shiny expensive pen, I want it.  A pen is small and easy to disappear into a pocket or bag.

Ink

  • See above problem about blotting.  Some inks are so WET that they blot or bleed through very easily.  This also depends on the paper.
  • The ink should be dark enough to easily read.
  • Caution, some inks fade as they dry and get absorbed into the paper.  So they look much lighter dry than when you wrote them.
  • Turquoise ink: Sheaffer Skrip or Pelikan.

San Francisco Pen Show - August 23-25, 2019 - Redwood City, California

www.SFPenShow.com


#8 hrant

hrant

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Location:Yerevan (Armenia) and San Francisco
  • Flag:

Posted 21 March 2017 - 22:47

Hi Songbird!

 

I agree with the other posters about using a medium or broad point for signatures.  I'm assuming your poetry book is normal-size for normal-sized signatures.  For inks, Herbin is a solid performer and they do have violet!  Irishoshizuku ink (Pilot Brand) also has violet colors.  I would also recommend your Visconti Van Gogh as your signature pen. 

 

Two congratulations are in order!  One for your new book and one for going down the rabbit hole of fountain-pen addiction.


Edited by hrant, 21 March 2017 - 22:48.


#9 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:47

The Platinum #3776 is a lovely pen, but I think you might want to go for the medium, rather than the fine nib. The Platinum inks behave well enough - so I don't think you will have much of a problem with them. The Slip & Seal system works well. The blue-black ink has iron gall in it, so it may prove to be rather resilient to water. 

 

I have a Parker Urban (ball point) and its the most unbalanced pen in my collection. Maybe they've changed since I bought one. 

 

Another alternative might be to use the humble Parker jotter - yes, it's a ball point, but the ink will dry quickly, won't smear and leave a nice clean line - and refills are easy and clean to change.  

You're right. I just tried out the #3776 fine, and it's very fine, finer than I expected. It will work great though for grading papers. Lovely pen, but if I ever get another one, I'll go for a medium. Thanks!



#10 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:55

If and when...the day comes, I will use a M or B....and in I already have them an Oblique '50's-60's semi-flex nibs....those Vintage German pens are stubs besides the tad of flex.

IMO modern oblique is for folks with left eye dominance or left handers, in they have little line variation compared to the Vintage German ones.

 

I get a lot of flair.

F is way too narrow IMO. Just write a tad wider. An M is not really that wide at all, and is not as slapdash as a B could be.

Just don't use Pelikan 4001 Royal Blue, it fades.

 

What Continent are you on; we can guide you to easier inks to obtain. In Europe, Noodlers is hard to come by.....often not quick drying, though Noodler fans will tell which ones are.

 

MB is not as expensive as it seems, in there is a lot of ink in that classic bottle, 60cl. You do want the bottle...sooner or later. They have a nice Royal Blue.....Toffee a nice light brown would do. A bit upbeat.

 

 

PS you can always hold the book open for 7-8 seconds, in you are not being paid for how fast you sign and hand the book out. Contact in those few seconds is what you want to achieve. Contact is what the buyer wants too.

 

You can match the book cover, or the inner cover. There will be an ink that matches it and drys fast.

 

Congratulations on publishing.

I always through poetry too hard....

 

I'm writing a City Slicker Western Saga. Closing in on the last chapter and the massive cutting.

I'm in the U.S. I'll have to add the flag like everyone else seems to do :)

 

It's so strange that my fine worked well so far, but maybe it's because the Baystate Blue is so bright that it stood out more. I'll have to try MB inks. The bottle is so interesting looking.

 

Lol about holding the book open for 7-8 seconds.

 

Thanks for the congrats. It's truly a labor of love. Funny you find poetry hard because I find writing fiction hard since I don't have the patience to write a whole novel---but I do have the patience to edit a single poem for hours on end. And congrats for nearing the finish line on your book!



#11 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:59

Perhaps a Plaisir with M nib.

It will feel smoother than the F nib, and you won't worry about the pen.

 

 

Some purples and teals/turquoises fade.
For a bright blue, water resistant, perhaps Sailor Jentle blue or Pilot Blue

I can't believe I didn't think of this---I'll get a M nib Plaisir soon. They are so inexpensive and have been pretty reliable so far. Thanks for the ink recommendation---that Sailor Jentle blue is pretty and seems reliable. I do have the Namiki blue, which is also a nice ink.



#12 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:04

Not that I am famous or anything...   BUT.. If the day comes where I need to sign my name.... I would use a a BB or a Broad Stub...  a Flex will be lovely .. Bottom line, something that will make my signature POP out of the paper...   :lol:  :lol:

 

(Assuming regular book paper.. and not glossy paper)

 

 

Inks.. If it is a Murder Mystery... I would go for BLOOD RED....  A Poetry book... I can go with Bright Blue/Purple/Orange/Green...  ;)

 

 

 

C. 

Lol---I'm so not famous. Just happy to have my little poetry book out with an independent publisher :) I think I just having fun playing "poet" for awhile and signing books for mostly friends and family. 

 

I agree with the bright colors---the last I want is a typical black or blue. On a side note, I've been eyeing the Diamine Oxblood--that seems super blood red.



#13 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:04

About ink... Keep away from Baystate Blue.. This ink stains almost everything... :gaah: 

It's all over my hands right now :) 



#14 cattar

cattar

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • Location:PNW

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:13

Bleach can take it out, but it's rough of hands.



#15 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:16

 

CRUM

 

I hit a key by accident and lost my entire post  :angry:

 

Paper.

What is the paper of the page you will be signing on?

  • Some papers will BLOT a fountain pen.  Some inks will make this worse.
  • Some papers will be the opposite and the fountain pen ink will take forever to dry.  A 'sharpie' may be the best tool for this kind of paper.
  • In general, finer nib pens are more sensitive to the texture of the paper.  This is why a F nib will feel scratchy whereas a M nib will feel just fine, when writing on the same paper.

Pen

  • First, you want a RELIABLE pen.
    • This also means that you do NOT want a pen that might drip/drool ink onto the book.  IMHO, this mean NOT a Noodler's pen, or any pen that you have had dripping/drooling problems with.
  • See above problem with fine nib pens and paper.
  • You want the ink line to be easily visible.  That usually means a WIDE enough ink line that the customer can easily see, not a spider web thin XF ink line.
  • Comparing nibs, a Pilot M nib is like a TWSBI/Pelikan F nib.  Generally, the Japanese nibs are finer than the western nibs.
  • A stub or CI nib might be nice, but could also be difficult and slower to write with.  Depends on how familiar you are with them.  You also have to write larger with them.
  • Taking from Cyber, I might use a flex dip pen, but that is probably impractical.  And if someone bumps the table hard, a spilled bottle of ink will be MESSY.
  • Personally, I would also NOT use an EXPENSIVE pen.  Too many strangers, and the "'crow effect" could happen.  Oooo nice shiny expensive pen, I want it.  A pen is small and easy to disappear into a pocket or bag.

Ink

  • See above problem about blotting.  Some inks are so WET that they blot or bleed through very easily.  This also depends on the paper.
  • The ink should be dark enough to easily read.
  • Caution, some inks fade as they dry and get absorbed into the paper.  So they look much lighter dry than when you wrote them.
  • Turquoise ink: Sheaffer Skrip or Pelikan.

 

The paper has a very organic feel to it (have no idea the exact type) -- not glossy. Not sure if the reason it worked well was that I was using a fine nib---I was afraid the medium would be too wet on the paper and feather, but I think I'll get brave and try a medium, but perhaps not with the Baystate blue. I do think I am preferring the feel of the medium nib pens, though I also teach and I like the fine nib for writing on cheap paper because it doesn't bleed/feather too much.

 

Yeah, you're right about reliable and NOT using the Noodler's pens. I have three and they all have varying degrees of dripping going on with them. The Ahab is nice to write with and worked great with Diamine sparkle inks, but I don't trust any of those pens, and I'll just keep them at my desk for when I want to do more of a faux calligraphy type of writing.

 

I am starting to lean toward mediums. As I mentioned in a reply above, maybe the fine worked ok initially because I was using such a bright ink. I bet I wouldn't get the same results with another less-bright shade. This also connects to your point about inexpensive pens---I'm nervous about sticky fingers or losing my pen. I may very well try the Plaisir in a medium for those reasons.

 

I have tried writing with a Goulet stub, and I love it, but it would slow me down for normal writing---great for my faux calligraphy.

 

I may try the Diamine Blue Velvet because it's deep and rich and seems to get even richer when the ink dries.



#16 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:17

Bleach can take it out, but it's rough of hands.

Thanks---already used bleach on my kitchen sink to get out the ink I spilled today :) 



#17 Songbird

Songbird

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:23

Hi Songbird!

 

I agree with the other posters about using a medium or broad point for signatures.  I'm assuming your poetry book is normal-size for normal-sized signatures.  For inks, Herbin is a solid performer and they do have violet!  Irishoshizuku ink (Pilot Brand) also has violet colors.  I would also recommend your Visconti Van Gogh as your signature pen. 

 

Two congratulations are in order!  One for your new book and one for going down the rabbit hole of fountain-pen addiction.

I just filled my Van Gogh with a tester I had of Ama-Iro---beautiful. Irishoshizuku has gorgeous inks (love the bottles). I'll have to play around with more colors of theirs. I do have De Atramentis Magenta Violet---I think it's one of my favorite inks.

 

Thanks for both of the congrats! Though I have gotten far down the fountain-pen rabbit hole and may never come back up for air again :) It's the fault of those damn Metropolitans and Plaisirs---they started my addiction---it was much better (or cheaper) when I just collected fountain pen pics on Pinterest.


Edited by Songbird, 22 March 2017 - 02:23.


#18 cattar

cattar

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • Location:PNW

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:25

That blue velvet is pretty.

 

I use preppys/plaisirs for experimenting with inks. If the Diamine is drier than the Plaisir likes, add a drop of dish soap to the cartridge/converter.



#19 PS104

PS104

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 903 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 03:10

First Congratulations

​You seemed to have done alright without my advice (no charge) and successfully fountain pens anyway

I hate to be a wet blanket but...

I would go with the Parker Jotter with a black or dark blue. No smear or dry time and water resistant (in case buyers like to read in the bathtub)

Fountain pens do present certain problems, the worst would be having yours burp on the book.

Then again they are a distraction. People want to focus on you, your book, the works, the inspiration, etc. Not what you are using to write with.

With regard to ink colors. They are also a distraction. Again blue or blue-black are de rigueur if you insist. Colors are just too cute.

Again. Congratulations.


Edited by PS104, 22 March 2017 - 03:18.


#20 sidthecat

sidthecat

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,910 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Flag:

Posted 22 March 2017 - 04:11

I find the Pilot Petit practically bulletproof, and you can stuff several into your pockets.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: baystate blue, twsbi 580, plaisir, pilot urban, visconti van gogh, platinum 3776, metropolitan



Sponsored Content




|