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What Can I Do With A Damaged Nib :( ?

platinum 3776 damage

12 replies to this topic

#1 steve50

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 11:29

Hey everyone. 

 

So I bought a Platinum 3776 SF nib second-hand, and it's been giving me some trouble. 

 

I don't know if it was like that out of the box, but when I received it from him, it was very dry. I try using different inks at first but I ended up modifying it a little. This didn't go down very well and the nib became rather scratchy. Luckily I got it repaired by the retailer but still it was not smooth like when I first acquired it. To make it smooth, I bought two sheets of lapping film (the same one as one in Goulet pens) and tuned the nib a little and it's got very scratchy again...I feel quite stupid now. I should have sent it to the retailer without trying to modify it on my own! And I blame nib tuning videos online a little, which make it sound too easy. 

 

Anyhow I don't want to throw it away after all these. The problem is that I don't think anyone sells replacement nib for this pen. The pen itself sells for $70 on Amazon, so that's not a too costly option I guess, but I don't want to have to buy one more of the same pen just for the nib. What do you suggest I do?? Thanks for reading! 



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#2 jar

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 11:52

Send it to someone who knows what they are doing.  The cost will still be a significant portion of the price of a new one but you will end up with something great as long as you did not remove all the tipping.

 

And yup.  Don't believe most videos found on YouTube.


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#3 Chrissy

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 12:02

It sounds like you may have gone to far with your nib on the lapping film. As you say, it's not too painful to start again, and maybe that could be your best option. Maybe you might consider a M nib rather than a needle like F Japanese nib?



#4 frankb3

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 06:54

Get a 10x or higher magnifier and inspect the tine alignment.  It has to be perfect or it will be scratchy, you should always do this before polishing.   Micromesh can take off significant material, but the lapping films are really fine, I doubt you did any real damage with polishing film unless you were grinding away for 20 minutes.



#5 steve50

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 18:01

Well I'm embarrassed to admit that I did grind my nib too much. Luckily, I found out that the retailer carries replacement nibs. Thanks for responses people!



#6 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 18:44

Mistakes make hard, well remembered lessons.

Easier to learn by the mistakes of others....cheaper too. :rolleyes:


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#7 gzp

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 02:33

If you'd like something to safely practice nib modification skills, do a search on the auction site for "jinhao 159" and "jinhao 159 nib 5pcs". Sort by lowest price. It's a nice pen and costs very little to try things and not have to worry about messing something up.

#8 steve50

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 06:54

Mistakes make hard, well remembered lessons.

Easier to learn by the mistakes of others....cheaper too. :rolleyes:

Yeh definitely haha. 



#9 steve50

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 06:55

If you'd like something to safely practice nib modification skills, do a search on the auction site for "jinhao 159" and "jinhao 159 nib 5pcs". Sort by lowest price. It's a nice pen and costs very little to try things and not have to worry about messing something up.

I might try that now that I have lapping films anyway. I realise that if you use it properly it can make your nib so smooth, because even in my damaged nib, there's a sweet spot where it's really super smooth. 



#10 amk

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 07:44

Always better to start on cheap nibs, either Jinhaos or bust up vintage steel nibs. I've just stubbed a Pelikan 100 CN nib which had the top of one tine broken off - it worked, but if it hadn't, the nib was worth nothing anyway.

 

Also, don't go to the lapping film first. Check the tines for alignment before you do it or you'll be wasting your effort. (Guess how I learned this....)

 

Platinum nibs do tend to write quite dry and give feedback, anyway.

 

As you're in the UK it might be best if you tried to get to a pen show where Oxonian is exhibiting - he can sort nibs out but he will probably indulge in a little gentle humour at your expense first.


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#11 Nail-Bender

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 21:19

A sort of related question.

 

Can I send the nib itself, without the pen, to MikeItWork?

 

I want to go from OB to EF on my extra nib and save the M that is on there now.

Then swap them myself.


Edited by ReadyFireAim, 07 March 2017 - 21:22.


#12 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 21:20

My CN nib is only regular flex....many have more flexible than semi-flex.

 

I think a good steel nib to be worth as much as a good gold nib. After all, all a gold nib is worth is a two -pack of beer.

 

It is true I have been waiting for money to rain through the hole in the roof  to send two semi-flex gold nibs that need to be re-tipped sent to Spain.

 

If my Osmia Supra steel nib....(Degussa) needed re-tipping it would be re-tipped before the gold Kaweco or the gold 'no name' Ideal nib. It is a better nib.

(I have Osmia Supra, a maxi-semi-flex,  in gold and steel.)


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 07 March 2017 - 21:23.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#13 siamackz

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:28

Well I'm embarrassed to admit that I did grind my nib too much. Luckily, I found out that the retailer carries replacement nibs. Thanks for responses people!


That's interesting, about the retailer carrying replacement nibs. I've asked all online retailers and they said Platinum doesn't provide replacement nibs - you need to buy the whole pen. I have a fine nib, but want a medium point now. Lucky you!

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