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Books That Include Snail Mail

snail mail letters books

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42 replies to this topic

#21 flyingfox

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 20:53

A few more books came to my mind...

"Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott. Receiving a letter from the Father, who is in the war zone, is absolutely the highlights of the lives of the protagonists (four girls and their Mom).

"Anne of Green Gables" series by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Back in the days, letters were very important part of people's lives... There are so many letters appear in the whole series, to bring news (whether happy or sad, good or bad...), to stay in touch, and so on.... Wonder if people, back in the days, sent letters in the way that people write Facebook status in this day and age??!! The author herself had several life-long penpals, whom she considered her close friends/ kindred spirits.

But- letters also were, and still maybe, a big part of life among immigrants... up until very recent years when social media and internet brought people closer together than ever. And- even now, there may be some folks of all ages who prefer snail mail (yea!!!)

"Mrs. Dutta Writes a Letter" in "Unknown Errors of Our Lives" by Chita Banerjee Divakaruni. A lot of thoughts goes in, even before one gets enough courage to write The Truth in her letter... All the stories in this book (a collection of short stories) are beautiful.

"The Namesake" by Jhumpa Lahiri. Sometimes a letter gets lost in the mail. And- sometimes the lost letter can change someone's life. Especially if the letter is from someone's deceased grandma, continents away, and supposed to include a piece of information that no one else knows.... I actually wondered if she even wrote the letter in the first place, but anyhow....


This series seems quite intriguing.
 
Book Trailer here for those searching for a trilogy with letters.... dum dum dum dum :ninja:
 
tumblr_mn8n1hetp91rsh471o1_500.jpg


Yea, they are great books, I highly recommend them!!!!!

Wow, thank you for the cool info!!! What a beautiful video clip... nice, retro atmosphere, perfect for the story. OMG makes me want to go back to Barcelona, yet again....

Incidentally, this interactive map shows you the places that appear in the first book of the trilogy. One of the important locations from the book is a post office, kind of fitting!!! Hopefully the link will appear without any problem....

https://www.routeyou...ur-of-barcelona

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#22 Maya288

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 03:49

okay, let's shift gear to the most extreme example:

S. by J.J. Abrams.

This book looks like a library book thats's been used by two people to communicate. The book is filled with written comments and contains a load of inserted letters and postcards (real, fysical insertions, if you're not carefull with this book, they'll drop out and your floor is covered with them). A fascinating reading experience.

 

3021011-slide-s-2-novel-ship-of-thesus-b

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

SWEET! That looks awesome. Here is a video look see. Oooooohhhh



#23 linearM

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 03:55

I just took S out of my library and was going to mention it.  KaB you beat me to it!!  I haven't started it yet and am wondering what the best way is to read it.  Do you read the notations in the margins first or read a chapter and then read the comments?  



#24 Rita_K

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 05:37

I just took S out of my library and was going to mention it.  KaB you beat me to it!!  I haven't started it yet and am wondering what the best way is to read it.  Do you read the notations in the margins first or read a chapter and then read the comments?  

 

 

 

SPOILER ALERT !!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

linearM, this is an explanation by someone called Veltscroll in the Amazon customer reviews on how they read the book. I hope this will be of some help.

As cool as all the inserts are, trying to keep them from falling out of the book as you're reading is a pain, so take them out and use post-it notes to mark what page they came from, then put them in an envelope that you can easily access.

Now, J&E's notes are not entirely in chronological order. You can generally go by the color of the ink between them to tell what phase of their story you're at.

First, there's Eric's pencil notes to himself about the actual book. Then, the convo between J&E begins when Jen picks up Eric's book and sees his notes and begins commenting on them in the margins. He sees this and writes back. Those early messages are Jen: Blue Ink - Eric: Black Ink

At some point after they go through the book a first time, they go through again. This time Jen: Orange Ink - Eric: Green Ink.

Then a third time Jen: Purple Ink - Eric: Red Ink

Finally, a fourth time (which seems to be after the denouement, in which they retrospectively discuss what has transpired). These are less frequent, and both Jen and Eric are in Black Ink.

***Read each chapter of the main text of SoT, ignoring all of Jen & Eric's notes. Upon finishing each chapter, you're going to want to go back and read only the blue/black notes and any referenced inserts. Then, move on to the next chapter. After you finish the whole book, go back and read only the orange/green notes and referenced inserts. Then purple/red, then black/black.***


Edited by Rita_K, 10 February 2017 - 16:35.


#25 linearM

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 05:52

It sounds like it isn't a simple read through....Thanks for the information on S! 



#26 KaB

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 10:04

 

linearM, this is an explanation by someone called Veltscroll in the Amazon customer reviews on how they read the book. I hope this will be of some help.

As cool as all the inserts are, trying to keep them from falling out of the book as you're reading is a pain, so take them out and use post-it notes to mark what page they came from, then put them in an envelope that you can easily access.

Now, J&E's notes are not entirely in chronological order. You can generally go by the color of the ink between them to tell what phase of their story you're at.

First, there's Eric's pencil notes to himself about the actual book. Then, the convo between J&E begins when Jen picks up Eric's book and sees his notes and begins commenting on them in the margins. He sees this and writes back. Those early messages are Jen: Blue Ink - Eric: Black Ink

At some point after they go through the book a first time, they go through again. This time Jen: Orange Ink - Eric: Green Ink.

Then a third time Jen: Purple Ink - Eric: Red Ink

Finally, a fourth time (which seems to be after the denouement, in which they retrospectively discuss what has transpired). These are less frequent, and both Jen and Eric are in Black Ink.

***Read each chapter of the main text of SoT, ignoring all of Jen & Eric's notes. Upon finishing each chapter, you're going to want to go back and read only the blue/black notes and any referenced inserts. Then, move on to the next chapter. After you finish the whole book, go back and read only the orange/green notes and referenced inserts. Then purple/red, then black/black.***

 

 

You might consider adding ****** spoiler alert***** to your post.

For example: for me it was a great experience to first discover that you could recognise the two readers/writers by their handwriting, then to see the pens they used mark different times of reading/reacting to each other and then to find out in which order they added their notes :-) 


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#27 KaB

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 10:05

I just took S out of my library and was going to mention it.  KaB you beat me to it!!  I haven't started it yet and am wondering what the best way is to read it.  Do you read the notations in the margins first or read a chapter and then read the comments?  

 

My personal advice would be not to read (or re-read) the reading instructions provided so gently by Rita_K but to enjoy the experience of finding out for yourself how to read this book in a way that fits you best. 


fpn_kab_tsuki_yo_most_boring_212x150.gif  Current rotation: home: Lamy Al-star 1.5, GvFC Moss Green; Lamy Vista 1.1, Diamine Oxblood; Sheaffer Touchdown 0.6, Sailor Kin-Mokusei

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#28 Rita_K

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 16:45

 

 

You might consider adding ****** spoiler alert***** to your post.

For example: for me it was a great experience to first discover that you could recognise the two readers/writers by their handwriting, then to see the pens they used mark different times of reading/reacting to each other and then to find out in which order they added their notes :-) 

 

 

KaB, I've added a Spoiler Alert to my post  as you suggested.

 

By the way, these suggestions were not mine but that of a Customer Reviewer on Amazon.

I found knowing the different colors helpful and it certainly didn't give away anything of the story.

I do apologize if I have ruined the experience for anyone.



#29 Lord Epic

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 18:06

How about the Letters of Note series? They're books of letters from various sources that the author, Shaun Usher compiles. Not strictly letters though, there are postcards, memos and whatnot included as well.

 

Currently two books in the series, probably more to come in the future.

 

A lovely read and I highly recommend it.

 

http://www.lettersofnote.com/

 

 

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From the land where palm trees grow,
And I want before I die
My soul's verses to bestow.
 
All those moments will be lost in time.
Like tears in rain.
Time to die.

 


#30 stonezebra

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 22:14

"Mary and Me: A Lasting Link Through Ink" https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1 by Mary Potter Kenyon.

I have "S" but have never managed to get through it. The extras were too distracting, will remember and try the suggestions made by the Amazon reviewer.

#31 Rita_K

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 16:33

I found the hard cover edition of this book at the Dollar Tree yesterday. I figured for a dollar I couldn't go wrong :) .

I notice it got some pretty good reviews on Amazon.

 

Letters from Skye



#32 stonezebra

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:52

I found the hard cover edition of this book at the Dollar Tree yesterday. I figured for a dollar I couldn't go wrong :) .
I notice it got some pretty good reviews on Amazon.
 
Letters from Skye

I read that not long ago and enjoyed it.

#33 Maya288

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 05:56

"Mary and Me: A Lasting Link Through Ink" https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1 by Mary Potter Kenyon.

I have "S" but have never managed to get through it. The extras were too distracting, will remember and try the suggestions made by the Amazon reviewer.

 

I am super interested in this book. I might just look for it at the bookstore this weekend. THX!

 

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#34 Gral

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 13:24

Dangerous Liaisons (Choderlos de Laclos)


=== Tenet insanibile multos scribendi cacoethes. Horace ===


#35 Pickwick

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 15:39

"Dear Liar" by Jerome Kitty, based on the letters between George Bernard Shaw and Mrs. Patrick Campbell.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

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#36 HollyDav

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Posted 14 April 2017 - 22:00

I really enjoyed The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katrina Bivald. It's about pen pals. 



#37 fountainpagan

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 06:54

I have just finished 84, Charing Cross Road after I saw it here. I thought the idea of helding such a long correspondence, and buying books from across the ocean was enticing, and one could expect a lot of emotion.

 I bought it in french, read it in a couple of hours, closed the book and wondered why it had had such a sucess... If the letters chosen to represent 20 years of correspondence, where those in the book, I found that the correspondence they held was quite boring, and had not the humour announced in the back cover. I then said to myself that it was the translation fault, forcebly, otherwise wy would they have made a film and all? I know that many a joke cannot be correctly translated, and one loses the real significance of it. I even wondered if allthe letters had been translated.

I ordered the original version.

Read it in a couple of hours, too.

Am still wondering where is all the exciting correspondence announced in the back cover. :(

I understand, though, that a film has been made. the all idea is very cinematographic.


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#38 linearM

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 18:20

I have a book related to 84,Charing Cross Road , though very indirectly.  The author is the son of the owner of the book store at 84, Charing Cross Road.  There are lots of 'L'"E''T''T''E''R''S', but no letters.  There is a mention of a fountain pen.  The book is Between Silk and Cyanide, A Codemaker's War 1941-1945 by Leo Marks. the book deals with codes, codemaking, Cryptography, secret agents behind enemy lines, and interagency competition during WWII.  The only problem I saw with the book was that it was so hard to put down.  This wasn't my usual book, got it from a friend, but I would highly recommend it.



#39 LetterRevivalist

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 18:49

David Williams' When the English Fall is based on handwritten diaries, and mentions a handwritten letter.

 

https://www.workman....he-english-fall


http://www.ALuckyLifeBook.com

 

http://www.bobsoltys.com

 

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#40 Runnin_Ute

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 22:42

The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak.

Brad
 
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