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Nibs For Sanskrit And Tibetan?

sanskrit tibetan economical inexpensive student

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21 replies to this topic

#1 Yarn-Yogini

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 20:03

Hey everyone

 

I'm wondering what nibs I should use for Sanskrit (Devanagari) and Tibetan scripts.  

 

Also, I am looking for cheap pens with said nib for a class I'll be teaching in September.  The students will be required to write in Sanskrit in a notebook for homework.  Ideally one that is an eye-dropper or converter.  

 

 

 

So I want a decent pen/nib for myself

but need a cheap alternative for my students.

 

 


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#2 Wolverine1

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 21:13

well, I am no calligrapher. Bu, when I learnt Sanskrit and Hindi while growing up in India, I just used a normal pen, something that we called a "medium" nib, which was akin to the nib of a European Fine. Same wennt for writing the little bit of Tibetan and Bhutanese script that I learnt. Sorry, couldnt be of much help.  Also try posting your question on one of the calligraphy/handwriting sub-forums. Guys like smk and the others there are very knowlegeable, and could help you out. 



#3 sidthecat

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 02:00

What an interesting class! How much thick and thin exists in the classic scripts?

Would something like an Arabic nib be useful?

 

Update: I had a look at some examples: there's not much line variation, so you don't need flexible nibs. The prettiest examples look like they were made with a broad nib, but a medium nib would be easier to find in an inexpensive pen. It looks like practically any pen would work.


Edited by sidthecat, 30 January 2017 - 02:04.


#4 Yarn-Yogini

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 03:47

What an interesting class! How much thick and thin exists in the classic scripts?

Would something like an Arabic nib be useful?

 

Update: I had a look at some examples: there's not much line variation, so you don't need flexible nibs. The prettiest examples look like they were made with a broad nib, but a medium nib would be easier to find in an inexpensive pen. It looks like practically any pen would work.

 

 

Not sure what you mean.  I have doubts any nib would work :-)  Hence the question.

 

I am thinking some sort of flat nib...  But then I wonder should I look (for myself) for a slanted nib or??? (I'm more willing to invest)  I found an arabic tip on aliexpress for $20  (incl. pen)

 

So far the only contender in a reasonable price range has been the Pilot Plummix 

My plan is to get them all a notebook with seyes paper and a pen.  So I don't want their cost to be above $15CDN if I can help it.  (they already have 2 textbooks $100 + optional 3)

 

I did see Goulet has 1mm broad tips in their Pilot Metropolitans!


To think one can write Truth is but an illusion of words. Now BEAUTY!  That's a poem of words & forms!

profile pic credit: Tashi Mannox


#5 cattar

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 04:04

Why require a particular fountain pen? Any pencil or pen could be used.

Perhaps give the option of fountain pens that you have experience with.

Would not suggest an eyedropper pen without a warning that it could be a leaky mess. I'd be upset if an instructor required one and it leaked and ruined my clothing, bag, other coursework.
Also piston fillers require a bit of care and can burp onto homework.
Cartridge/converters or disposables tend to be the easiest introductory fountain pens.



#6 Yarn-Yogini

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 04:13

well, I am no calligrapher. Bu, when I learnt Sanskrit and Hindi while growing up in India, I just used a normal pen, something that we called a "medium" nib, which was akin to the nib of a European Fine. Same wennt for writing the little bit of Tibetan and Bhutanese script that I learnt. Sorry, couldnt be of much help.  Also try posting your question on one of the calligraphy/handwriting sub-forums. Guys like smk and the others there are very knowlegeable, and could help you out. 

 

 

 

Thanks for the tip.  I'll try posting there too.

I have a fine nib and I really don't like how my Devanagari looks with it, unless I write quite tiny.  I prefer my 1mm rollerball to the fine nib, but still not satisfied.  Forget the Tibetan...I'm still using the Uchen script and haven't learned the Ume. Uchen definitely needs a flat nib I think.


To think one can write Truth is but an illusion of words. Now BEAUTY!  That's a poem of words & forms!

profile pic credit: Tashi Mannox


#7 Noihvo

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 19:46

fpn_1485892005__img_2686.jpg

Just in case you couldn't read my chicken scratch, here is an example: http://www.ebay.com/...IwAAOSwanRXg-Y9


Edited by Noihvo, 31 January 2017 - 19:48.

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#8 sidthecat

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 20:43

Here's a couple of examples of handwritten Sanskrit:

fpn_1485895145__sanskrit_2.jpg

fpn_1485895337__sanskrit.jpg

A broad nib will give you most of the scope I see in this writing.



#9 Tanipat

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Posted 01 February 2017 - 10:08

Some of Sanskrit characters are similar to Thai. Many of Thai words base on Sanskrit and Pali. Thai character has many up stroke, so writing with italic nib is easier than flex.



#10 sidthecat

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 19:23

I don't think flex is necessary. I wonder if the original scribes used something like a flat-tipped brush?


Edited by sidthecat, 02 February 2017 - 19:23.


#11 Wolverine1

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Posted 02 February 2017 - 19:43

I think Salman told me, and the scribes i saw in India growing up used a reed pen, which they would get ready by cutting with a knife. It was a  nib that was shaped like a mini-chisel.



#12 Yarn-Yogini

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 18:35

It is in fact a reed pen used.

 

the reason I am doing the pen & notebook requirement is to be inclusive of all types of learners.

Some people are more kinesthetic and by having a notebook and writing out their homework in the Devanagari script it will keep them more engaged.  It also forces them to be more mindful of what/how they are writing, which encourages memorization.

 

This is a beginning Sanskrit course for adults - most of them will be in their early twenties and North American.  I expect to see a few International students join as well most likely Asian.

 

The point is to get the students interacting with the language in a way that engages them, so reading, writing, speaking and listening as if it is a colloquial language.  Each person has 1 or 2 skills in languages that are naturally higher and I want them to have every opportunity to explore in the way they learn best.

 

I'm basically applying second language pedagogy principles to learning Sanskrit.  


To think one can write Truth is but an illusion of words. Now BEAUTY!  That's a poem of words & forms!

profile pic credit: Tashi Mannox


#13 Yarn-Yogini

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 18:36

fpn_1485892005__img_2686.jpg

Just in case you couldn't read my chicken scratch, here is an example: http://www.ebay.com/...IwAAOSwanRXg-Y9

 

 

OH thanks for that!  those are perfect and totally won't break the bank!


To think one can write Truth is but an illusion of words. Now BEAUTY!  That's a poem of words & forms!

profile pic credit: Tashi Mannox


#14 jayavant

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 06:27

I don't know Tibetan but I do know Sanskrit. It is written in Devanagari script. The strokes are heavy when going from top right to bottom left, and fine when going top left to bottom right. So, to write it well you need nib that has been cut obliquely from the tip down to the right - think of the shape of your right foot seen from above - the left edge sticks out more. Now I know this as a right oblique nib but I think there is some confusion about the nomenclature. It is the opposite of what is used for Arabic, which uses a left oblique.

 

I understand the best angle for the right oblique nib is 36 degrees. 

 

Personally I use an oblique nib holder to achieve this, but specially ground nibs are available.



#15 fountainpagan

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 06:41

The asian fudge nibs can be used for what you want. You can find them on EBay, as Jinhao calligraphy nib.

 

Also, look at this thread which shows a pen that is more than suitable for your needs:

http://www.fountainp...mages-included/


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#16 SenZen

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 22:57

I once watched a documentary, the sanskrit scribe used ink made from cow pee, which were fed mangos... Don't know if you want to go that authentic or whether any modern pen would survive that! :lol:


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#17 SoulSamurai

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 13:03

I once watched a documentary, the sanskrit scribe used ink made from cow pee, which were fed mangos... Don't know if you want to go that authentic or whether any modern pen would survive that! :lol:

 

Talk about suffering for your art!



#18 sidthecat

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 16:14

It doesn't sound like the cows suffered at all. Cow urine is a very sacred substance to a devout Hindu.
Unfortunately, I've watched too many episodes of "The Incredible Doctor Pol" to feel quite the same way about the stuff that comes out of a cow.

#19 mitto

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 16:53

:)
Khan M. Ilyas

#20 AlexLeGrande

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 22:13

Click pen from India, on Amazon or EBay.  A Devenagari four nib set (there's also an English set, with the nib ground in a slant in the opposite direction) costs $9.99, which includes the cost of shipping.  This is a eyedropper filler set, very inexpensive.  I just ordered the English lettering version which is slowly making its way to the US from India, so I cannot comment on its usability or quality, but for less than $10, I'm all in.  







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: sanskrit, tibetan, economical, inexpensive, student



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