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An Unusual Leverless

swan leverless 1930s

7 replies to this topic

#1 Cob

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 15:53

I am delighted to have acquired this rather unusual Leverless.  Of course I have (and have had) 1930s Leverless Swans with No 3 nibs, but I have never seen a rolled gold one.  Note also how the name is stamped - in the style of the New York models.

 

fpn_1485273123__rg_3_leverless.jpg

 

fpn_1485273143__rg_3_leverless_2.jpg

 

Rgds

 

Cob


fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


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#2 Greenie

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 01:30

I guess Americans are much rougher on their pens. The New York Swans similar to this always seem to be in a rather sorry state. This is exceptionally clean with no brassing. Very nice.

 

Is the barrel all metal, or an overlay on rubber or plastic? 

 

And out of ignorance, is "rolled gold" different from "gold filled"?



#3 Cob

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Posted 25 January 2017 - 05:03

I guess Americans are much rougher on their pens. The New York Swans similar to this always seem to be in a rather sorry state. This is exceptionally clean with no brassing. Very nice.

 

Is the barrel all metal, or an overlay on rubber or plastic? 

 

And out of ignorance, is "rolled gold" different from "gold filled"?

Hullo there!

 

Well, you know a lot of the gold-plated (that's what I call them!) New York pens are maybe ten years older than this one.  And in fact the split lever one is really very nearly as good and is perhaps 17 years older!  The barrel is an overlay; I was quite concerned in trying to get the section out to install a new sac.  As always I warmed it up with my powerful hairdryer and the metal covering made it very uncomfortable to hold!  After three blasts finally it came out.  Now normally when this happens the section is tight going back in.  This time it slid in perfectly without being too slack. 

 

I cannot imagine how these overlays were done - just consider the section.  Extraordinary.

 

As for "rolled gold" or "gold filled"  I have no idea I am afraid; "gold-filled " appears to be strictly the American terminology.

 

Best regards,

 

Cob


fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


#4 GerseSjaak

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 17:31

A very intriguing model you have there Cob, thanks for sharing! :)



#5 Vintagepens

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 22:22

A very handsome model. Also made in sterling silver -- very tough to find!

 

When referring to older pens, there's really no difference between rolled gold and gold filled. One is standard usage in Britain, the other, in the USA.

 

The application of overlays to sections and barrels in cases like this entailed spinning the metal onto the hard rubber (reducing its diameter via pressure while spinning the workpiece on a lathe).



#6 Cob

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 16:56

A very intriguing model you have there Cob, thanks for sharing! :)

 

Thank you very much.  It is a lovely pen.

 

A very handsome model. Also made in sterling silver -- very tough to find!

 

When referring to older pens, there's really no difference between rolled gold and gold filled. One is standard usage in Britain, the other, in the USA.

 

The application of overlays to sections and barrels in cases like this entailed spinning the metal onto the hard rubber (reducing its diameter via pressure while spinning the workpiece on a lathe).

 Thanks.  That's most interesting..How clever to evolve that technique, though I amconcerned about the split lever pen since the little pivot pins for the levers are not cips - and are buried beneath the metal covering!  I suppose Mabie Todd never imagined that their products would last so long and be so highly prized after 98 years!

 

Cob


fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


#7 Vintagepens

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 15:37

Metal spinning has been around for centuries, commonly used to shape bowls and the like. On pens with more cylindrical barrels, there is typically little or no tapering at the front end of the overlay. So pulling the overlay off isn't so tough as it would be if the hard rubber underneath had to be heated enough to be squeezed out through a tapered overlay.

 

Many later metal Swans, however, are made differently, with a brass liner soldered in place rather than a full hard rubber barrel inside.



#8 Cob

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 17:07

Metal spinning has been around for centuries, commonly used to shape bowls and the like. On pens with more cylindrical barrels, there is typically little or no tapering at the front end of the overlay. So pulling the overlay off isn't so tough as it would be if the hard rubber underneath had to be heated enough to be squeezed out through a tapered overlay.

 

Many later metal Swans, however, are made differently, with a brass liner soldered in place rather than a full hard rubber barrel inside.

Thanks again.

 

Cob


fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg




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