Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

M805 Stiff Nib :(

m1000 m800 m805 pelikan

  • Please log in to reply
43 replies to this topic

#21 Lam1

Lam1

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location:Minnesota, U.S.
  • Flag:

Posted 14 January 2017 - 02:55

sargetalon and Lam1

 

I own quite a few Pelikans (actually I dare not say how many), but here is the thing... I started with an M1000... bought a few of those... decided to try the classical Pelikans and bought a few Gunther Wagners (was told they were the earliest pelikans)... bought a few of those... then heard about the 400NN... so bought a few of those.

 

So that is how I work I like to buy repeats of the pens I like mostly in different colours or nib sizes... and they were all soft... Ah man... even the steel nib on one of the Gunther Wagners is so soft. 

 

Anyway... I think what I am trying to say is that I think I might get it nibmeister-ed... but it has only been a week... I will give it a few more weeks and if I still cannot live with it... just get it worked on.

 

Thanks you both

 

I also dare not say how many I have, and I also buy many of those I like the most (the trouble is I like them all). The M1000 was my third one, but it is the M800 that I have more.

 

But if it is soft/flex nibs that you like, they are certainly not the best choice. When you know what you like, you know what you like.  :)

 

I am also getting the urge to acquire more of the vintage ones, particularly because it's possible to get some tortoises with those wonderful nibs that you mention.

 

I hope you come to like your M800, but if that is not possible, good luck finding the best solution.



Sponsored Content

#22 Freddy

Freddy

    Museum Piece

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,913 posts
  • Location:Gold Coast, NY
  • Flag:

Posted 14 January 2017 - 02:58

 

 

I do so hate to engage with comments such as these but do not wish to see others led astray.  I am indeed fond of Pelikan's writing instruments and make no bones about it.  I'm also critical of the brand where appropriate.  My "fanaticism" for the brand isn't just blind devotion.  It was earned because the company consistently puts out a well crafted and reliable product. When that is not the case, the company and its vendors provide reasonable and fair warranty support.  Pelikan nibs are not all perfect.  Today's offerings are shadows of their former selves in terms of spring, variety, and expressiveness.  There is no such thing as infallible quality control. All manufacturers have issues. Have I had Pelikan nibs that were not good out of the box?  Absolutely.  I have had several lemons.  The large majority, however, have worked perfectly.  My sample size is not half a dozen.  I own 100s of different Pelikans. The majority of nibs have been fine if somewhat pedestrian.  I freely admit that my evidence is anecdotal but no more so than any other offered thus far.  Certainly no conclusive evidence has been presented with which to back up hyperbolic claims of wide spread quality control failure and none will be because it doesn't exist, at least not in lay hands.  Even the linked "evidence" is still just a single persons subjective opinion.  Any attempt to condemn the company for poor quality control without offering credible and objective evidence is just falsehoods and inflammatory speech.  The arguments presented against the company and their "lazy business model" have numerous informal fallacies that erode any validity.  That is as realistic as I can be.  I do not wish to engage in this topic any further and freely accept that we will just have to agree to disagree on this topic.

 

   Hear!   Hear!

 

  Fred



#23 Lam1

Lam1

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location:Minnesota, U.S.
  • Flag:

Posted 14 January 2017 - 04:57

 

 

I know you guys are fanatically fond of your Pelikans, but maybe this means that you're not quite seeing them in a totally realistic light.

 

I prefer to go by the hundreds of reviews I read on the net, plus my own experiences. And to back it up, someone who tests them says In my job, I tune many Pelikan nibs every week. I would say only about 40% of them have no nib issues right out of the box!

 

There is no doubt whatsoever that Pelikan has issues with QC whatever you may wish to believe. Pelikans may well have been of higher standards in the past, but modern day Pelikans have long since lost their way even if their lazy business model is doing well.

Therefore it's not unreasonable to suggest that the chances of inconsistencies in the OPs nib are relatively high.

 

I apologize to the OP for deviating from his original question.

 

I thought long and hard as to whether I should respond to the post quoted above or not. But I'm also tired of seeing this kind of statements in every possible thread that involves Pelikan, in what seems to be a "crusade" against the brand. And this crusade seems to never have anything fruitful to add to the discussion: the OP asks specifically about M800 nibs and, by your account in other threads, you never had a M800. Still, you claim that they are inconsistent, as anything Pelikan apparently.

 

I am very sorry that your Pelikan M600 was faulty, but that does not mean that all, or most, or even 40% of Pelikans are bad (this brand is, apparently, not the sole focus of the crusade, since similar claims have been made by you in other threads about Montblanc and, by your own account in other threads, you never owned a MB).

 

Many members have tried to explain in other threads why your claims are not correct. But you choose to ignore sound arguments in favor of unsubstantiated claims. Experience from well-respected collectors such as Sargetalon, who has 100's of Pelikans, are simply ignored. (By the way, both here and in his blog, Sargetalon offers some of most sensible and balanced contributions that I've read online about any brand, never shying away of criticizing Pelikan when that criticism is deserved and substantiated by hard data. Hence, calling him "fanatical" is utterly out of place).

 

I have never made any secret of the fact that Pelikan is my favorite brand, although I like a few other brands very much too. But I never claimed that their pens are perfect (the M800 is almost perfect for me, it lacks a more expressive and springy nib though), and I certainly do not have any allegiance to them: if they were to start sending me bad pens, I would certainly stop buying them. I also have had problematic Pelikan pens (misaligned tines), and I was certainly not happy about it. However, the last time I received a misaligned tine from Pelikan was 2 years and 40 pens ago. Again, in another thread a member with similar results explained to you why simple mathematics shows that if the claim that "40% are faulty" were true this would be essentially impossible. That simple and sound mathematical argument was ignored. There are also many other clear faults in the argument of the post you quote, as for example the fact that the person does not offer an explanation of how he/she is selecting the sample to base the claims, the clear fact that that sample may be tainted since his/her job seems to be to fix pens, what are the criteria for the "rough approximation" mentioned, etc.

 

In yet another thread members explained the engineering challenges involved in production and why no company can be infallible, yet again ignored. This has been going on and on for a long time.

 

The problem is not really that the claims are directed against this specific brand, but that they are stated as if well known "facts", when simple critical analysis shows that there is no evidence for them (I'm referring here to the broad claims, such as "Consistency isn't great with Pelikan's..." or "their lazy business model").

 

There certainly are problems, they happen with all brands, and I wish they didn't happen. But this is a forum were people often come to learn and that kind of broad unsubstantiated claim is not helpful at all. 


Edited by Lam1, 14 January 2017 - 05:00.


#24 invisuu

invisuu

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 533 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 14 January 2017 - 13:13

Lam1, sargetalon - if nothing else, I thank you for your responses. As someone who's expecting a new Pelikan to be delivered any moment now, your posts make my waiting easier. 



#25 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,388 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 14 January 2017 - 14:26

I've somewhere about 70-80 mostly European pens. Most by far are vintage pre'70 to some '30's....and then semi-vintage....pre'98 to '80's. I have more semi-vintage from Pelikan than anything else.

 

 

How I ended up with so many Pelikan pens I don't know. Three are new, a 200, a 215  (I needed a nice springy 200's nib and was never ever going to buy a 200...in I had so many 400's.) and a 605. The rest are used....some 4 from '90's.....a 400, a 381 and two Celebries...though they could be a bit later....and a W.Germany 200. There is also a 150. Those are all 'true' regular flex nibs.

Nibs I have learned to like...nibs that are a tad better often with shading inks than semi-flex.

 

Semi/maxi-semi-flex nibs are sometimes too wet, and swallow shading unless matched well to ink and paper.

 

Vintage pens....120 regular flex, 100n-superflex of the Easy Full Flex....first stage of super flex (Minewhas the green ink window so is post War...and I was shocked both the 100n and Ibis were still made until 1954. The other Pelikans are mix of semi-flex and maxi-semi-flex.....(Which was 'normal' in that era. I have MB, Osmia, Geha and Pelikan in those two flexes.)

 

I ended up with many more 400's than I ever expected to own. A D nib,....in semi-flex OM, OB, B in tortoise, two 140's OF and OB.  A 400nn in maxi-semi-flex OF, a 500 in maxi OBBB...a real signature pen...one needs 2/3 a page to sign. and a maxi .... Ibis...gold nib. I'd not expected the gold nib nor that it would be maxi-semi-flex.

 

If I went hunting in my boxes I might find another Pelikan or two.

Only three are tortoise, a '90's 400, a '54' transitional, and the 500.

Now that was a fancy pen I never even realized existed in it was so far over my normal max budget of E100. I got it for E150, when the money for my Grail pen burnt a hole in my pocket.

 

I've not had a single problem with any of them.

Could well be that problem pens had been ditched eon's ago....and never came to sale.

 

Pelikan has a illegal life time repair of pens program. So are solidly made to prevent use of that.

 

 

If one or two were a bit misaligned tined....I fixed that with out a seconds thought.  That can happen with old used pens.

In that is not a problem once one has done it the second time.

I've even banged a pen my self.....my oh my....me....I actually banged a nib a bit and knocked it out of alignment. 5 seconds later it was writing great.

 

What other problem can there be....well the '30's pens could need a new cork....or those before the better plastic gasket of '55 could use a new gasket. 90-70 years is a long time for 1.0 plastic gasket to last.

 

Some folks are shocked there is no American Bump Under tipping on '30-65 nibs...that they are stubbish  flat bottomed. That is not a fault but a plus.

 

Had I problems with my Pelikans I'd had a bigger collection of Osmia or even a collection of Soennecken pens.

 

I do like the semi-vintage and like the vintage nibs even more. I do not like the modern nibs on the 400/600. The 200's nib is still good.

 

I think they on the 200 are springy 'true' regular flex......there are those who say they are now more nailish or semi-nail.

That I don't know in I only have two modern ones.

Sargetalon would know...

 

Pelikan don't need to be taken apart to be greased once every three years. Folks that take their Pelikans apart like a Twisbi or Ahab.....do have problems with Pelikans which are not made to do such.

Though the 800/1000 are easier to take apart....for those who are so AR.

 

Good post Lam1.

 

Piston pens are harder to make than spout only CC pens.

There are occasional problems mentioned here....and the advice is to send it to Chartpack if under warrantee or Pelikan it's self when not. That is not all that often.

 

Yep....modern 400/600 nibs are fatter than semi-vintage....fatter than Japanese....buy a 200's, semi-vintage or vintage nib for them. I have a '54 400's semi-flex B nib on my 605. :drool: :notworthy1: :thumbup: :puddle:


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#26 Bluey

Bluey

    Somewhere between green and indigo

  • Away
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,961 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 14 January 2017 - 14:57

What a shame that Pelikan quality isn't able to speak for itself but needs the fans to speak for it.  I think I may have touched a raw nerve.


Edited by Bluey, 14 January 2017 - 16:09.

Mediterranean blue, Asa Goa, China blue, Royal blue, Sapphire blue, Indigo, Washable Blue....the colours of the rainbow.

#27 billy1380

billy1380

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts
  • Location:Nottingham, UK

Posted 14 January 2017 - 17:49

If the line is dry, try another ink (the 4001 blue is dry and pale). But be patient before sending the nib to a "meister" - I've been kind of unhappy with a nib out of the box - mostly because it's too wide and wet - but usually end up *loving* it in the end. I regret having some nibs reground.

 

Only ink I tried in that pen so far is Diamine Mediterranean Blue... I have a couple more lined up to try in there... I will not rush!



#28 billy1380

billy1380

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts
  • Location:Nottingham, UK

Posted 14 January 2017 - 17:51

I hope you come to like your M800, but if that is not possible, good luck finding the best solution.

 

Thank you very much... I really appreciate that.



#29 billy1380

billy1380

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts
  • Location:Nottingham, UK

Posted 14 January 2017 - 18:03

I've somewhere about 70-80 mostly European pens. Most by far are vintage pre'70 to some '30's....and then semi-vintage....pre'98 to '80's. I have more semi-vintage from Pelikan than anything else.

 

 

How I ended up with so many Pelikan pens I don't know. Three are new, a 200, a 215  (I needed a nice springy 200's nib and was never ever going to buy a 200...in I had so many 400's.) and a 605. The rest are used....some 4 from '90's.....a 400, a 381 and two Celebries...though they could be a bit later....and a W.Germany 200. There is also a 150. Those are all 'true' regular flex nibs.

Nibs I have learned to like...nibs that are a tad better often with shading inks than semi-flex.

 

Semi/maxi-semi-flex nibs are sometimes too wet, and swallow shading unless matched well to ink and paper.

 

Vintage pens....120 regular flex, 100n-superflex of the Easy Full Flex....first stage of super flex (Minewhas the green ink window so is post War...and I was shocked both the 100n and Ibis were still made until 1954. The other Pelikans are mix of semi-flex and maxi-semi-flex.....(Which was 'normal' in that era. I have MB, Osmia, Geha and Pelikan in those two flexes.)

 

I ended up with many more 400's than I ever expected to own. A D nib,....in semi-flex OM, OB, B in tortoise, two 140's OF and OB.  A 400nn in maxi-semi-flex OF, a 500 in maxi OBBB...a real signature pen...one needs 2/3 a page to sign. and a maxi .... Ibis...gold nib. I'd not expected the gold nib nor that it would be maxi-semi-flex.

 

If I went hunting in my boxes I might find another Pelikan or two.

Only three are tortoise, a '90's 400, a '54' transitional, and the 500.

Now that was a fancy pen I never even realized existed in it was so far over my normal max budget of E100. I got it for E150, when the money for my Grail pen burnt a hole in my pocket.

 

I've not had a single problem with any of them.

Could well be that problem pens had been ditched eon's ago....and never came to sale.

 

Pelikan has a illegal life time repair of pens program. So are solidly made to prevent use of that.

 

 

If one or two were a bit misaligned tined....I fixed that with out a seconds thought.  That can happen with old used pens.

In that is not a problem once one has done it the second time.

I've even banged a pen my self.....my oh my....me....I actually banged a nib a bit and knocked it out of alignment. 5 seconds later it was writing great.

 

What other problem can there be....well the '30's pens could need a new cork....or those before the better plastic gasket of '55 could use a new gasket. 90-70 years is a long time for 1.0 plastic gasket to last.

 

Some folks are shocked there is no American Bump Under tipping on '30-65 nibs...that they are stubbish  flat bottomed. That is not a fault but a plus.

 

Had I problems with my Pelikans I'd had a bigger collection of Osmia or even a collection of Soennecken pens.

 

I do like the semi-vintage and like the vintage nibs even more. I do not like the modern nibs on the 400/600. The 200's nib is still good.

 

I think they on the 200 are springy 'true' regular flex......there are those who say they are now more nailish or semi-nail.

That I don't know in I only have two modern ones.

Sargetalon would know...

 

Pelikan don't need to be taken apart to be greased once every three years. Folks that take their Pelikans apart like a Twisbi or Ahab.....do have problems with Pelikans which are not made to do such.

Though the 800/1000 are easier to take apart....for those who are so AR.

 

Good post Lam1.

 

Piston pens are harder to make than spout only CC pens.

There are occasional problems mentioned here....and the advice is to send it to Chartpack if under warrantee or Pelikan it's self when not. That is not all that often.

 

Yep....modern 400/600 nibs are fatter than semi-vintage....fatter than Japanese....buy a 200's, semi-vintage or vintage nib for them. I have a '54 400's semi-flex B nib on my 605. :drool: :notworthy1: :thumbup: :puddle:

 

This is a little bit off the original topic... but... AWESOME!!!

 

Lam1

I expect a similar listing of all owned pen :D

 

You guys really know how to bring a thread to life!



#30 invisuu

invisuu

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 533 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 14 January 2017 - 18:14

What a shame that Pelikan quality isn't able to speak for itself but needs the fans to speak for it.  I think I may have touched a raw nerve.

 

But...Pelikan quality DOES speak for itself. For vast majority of us. It's only you and 1 other person on this entire forum stating otherwise.



#31 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,388 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 14 January 2017 - 18:30

I found I made a mistake when I bought my pretty blue on sale Cross Townsend. It was a nail. My wife got the ball point, and the pen is under the bed in it's box. I'll wait a few more years and see if someone wants it at a 'fair' price.

 

I was still 'noobie' enough to let beauty turn my head on a common nail nib.

 

I think at the time semi-flex was somewhat 'new' to me. I defiantly had no thoughts of actually owning a '50's 400.....much less the 4 I have. I think I had the 140 and a 400nn, and back then I didn't even know what maxi-semi-flex was that I had on the 400nn.

I now have 26 semi-flex and 16/17 maxi-semi-flex pens of that era.

:angry: :unsure: :headsmack: :gaah: :wallbash:

Ah....I can perhaps get it stubbed.....it is butter smooth....so what. :bunny01:

I have a 'B-M' CI of once OB nail Persona. I need to get a 'new' semi-nail Pelikan 600 BB made Stub or CI. I can add this Townsend to that set.

 

I don't know how wide your 800 is....but if it is F or bigger you can get it made stub. I'd not go CI in it has to be ground perfect for your angle and the 800 is somewhat heavy. That at least will give your writing some character in that nib.

If you do go Cursive italic, you have to make sure you send a picture of how you hold 'that' pen, so the angle is exact....not that you are forced to hold it high. Let it rest where it will ... so you get an angle that works.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#32 Christopher Godfrey

Christopher Godfrey

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 689 posts
  • Location:Gloucester (The Perfect Storm one, in Massachusetts)
  • Flag:

Posted 14 January 2017 - 18:32

Billy (OP): if you do decide to follow-up and investigate some nib guru, there is one company that springs to mind, since they do sell Pelikans -- look up Indy-Pen-Dance, which is owned by a young husband and wife who were trained by <himself>, the chief guru, Richard Binder.  Now, what they will say about making any mods to an 18ct nib, I don't know, since Richard used mostly to modify the 14s, I think; but it might be worth your while enquiring?  They have a good reputation, although I have had no personal dealings with them.

 

I, too, am of the mind that you need to look at something vintage for best results, if true flex is your medicine (it is mine) -- probably 400 or 400NN, since they are plentiful and fairly inexpensive.

 

All the best (BTW: I own three sea kayaks -- had four: sold one -- that were built...in Nottingham!)  Signed: an expat.



#33 billy1380

billy1380

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts
  • Location:Nottingham, UK

Posted 14 January 2017 - 19:15

I don't know how wide your 800 is....but if it is F or bigger you can get it made stub. I'd not go CI in it has to be ground perfect for your angle and the 800 is somewhat heavy. That at least will give your writing some character in that nib.

If you do go Cursive italic, you have to make sure you send a picture of how you hold 'that' pen, so the angle is exact....not that you are forced to hold it high. Let it rest where it will ... so you get an angle that works.

 

I got this one in an F... never owned a CI, actually not owned an italic in a gold nib.

 

Billy (OP): if you do decide to follow-up and investigate some nib guru, there is one company that springs to mind, since they do sell Pelikans -- look up Indy-Pen-Dance, which is owned by a young husband and wife who were trained by <himself>, the chief guru, Richard Binder.  Now, what they will say about making any mods to an 18ct nib, I don't know, since Richard used mostly to modify the 14s, I think; but it might be worth your while enquiring?  They have a good reputation, although I have had no personal dealings with them.

 

I, too, am of the mind that you need to look at something vintage for best results, if true flex is your medicine (it is mine) -- probably 400 or 400NN, since they are plentiful and fairly inexpensive.

 

Thanks for the recommendations. I have heard good things about Richard Binder... just by looking at other threads on here... but not heard of Indy-Pen-Dance... I will definitely look them up.

 

Agree about the 400s and 400NNs the ones I have are lovely.

 

 

All the best (BTW: I own three sea kayaks -- had four: sold one -- that were built...in Nottingham!)  Signed: an expat.

 

I had no idea they built sea kayaks in Nottingham... I will have to look into this :D



#34 Lam1

Lam1

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,416 posts
  • Location:Minnesota, U.S.
  • Flag:

Posted 15 January 2017 - 04:53

Bo Bo, how are the nibs on the Celebries? Are they springy?

 

 

This is a little bit off the original topic... but... AWESOME!!!

 

Lam1

I expect a similar listing of all owned pen :D

 

You guys really know how to bring a thread to life!

 

It's going to be a while till I can update the collection pictures (lack of time and natural light around here, winter...). But the status of the Pelikan part of the collection in March/2016 was here :

 

http://www.fountainp...s-of-the-flock/

 

Since then a "few" were added, but several birds took flight with my son to Philly. I tried to convince him to leave his Pels here, that I would take good care of them, etc., but you know how are kids nowadays... -_- .



#35 max dog

max dog

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,371 posts
  • Location:British Columbia
  • Flag:

Posted 15 January 2017 - 07:34

 

As for how the M805 writes... it is a dry fine line (the nib is an F) and when you push the nib really hard the line gets wetter until the point when the nib starts to visibly separate, then it just dries out. When you stop, it instantly starts to write again, same thin, faded and dry line.

I don't have an M800, but I understand the M400 nibs are similarly wonderful.  The F nib on my M400 Brown Tortoise is delicious (out of the box) in that it puts down a juicy wet line.  If your M800 F nib line is dry, I'd give it a really good long soak and use it for a few weeks and if the line it puts down is still dry I'd send it back to Pelikan for a warranty nib replacement. 
 
BTW, in the book "Fountain Pens: A Collector's Guide", the author Peter Twydle calls the Pelikan M800 "THE PEN".  Fountain pen perfection.


#36 billy1380

billy1380

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts
  • Location:Nottingham, UK

Posted 15 January 2017 - 13:10

 

Amazing collection... and beautiful photography. Thanks for sharing.



#37 billy1380

billy1380

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts
  • Location:Nottingham, UK

Posted 15 January 2017 - 13:12

Thanks @max dog... will do.



#38 scratchofapen

scratchofapen

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 157 posts
  • Location:Germany
  • Flag:

Posted 15 January 2017 - 14:15

Oh, people. I know i am feeding something here...but has any one of the " brand abc is bad because def reasons and i don't like it" fraction thought about that their opinion is not the measure to anyone else?

In this thread there are excellent answers to the poster's question, and it could have ended after the first answer.

If someone don't like brand abc or what ever reason ok, but why does that result in an crusade to make everyone else belive the same? Not everyone wants to write with flex, not everyone likes shading and so on....no one is forced to use a brand x pen if he does not like the brand for what reason ever, and why the heck should one partissipate in a thread about a brand he don't like? Ranting?.

I am pleasantly surprised that in such a case here on FPN i have only seen moderate and calm reactions to this coming up.

Imagine how this thread looks to someone new to fountainpens, heaving a similar question and is directed here via an searchengine...

Edited by scratchofapen, 15 January 2017 - 14:17.


#39 sargetalon

sargetalon

    The answer to life, the universe, and everything

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,073 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia, PA
  • Flag:

Posted 15 January 2017 - 14:20

Oh, people. I know i am feeding something here...but has any one of the " brand abc is bad because def reasons and i don't like it" fraction thought about that their opinion is not the measure to anyone else?

In this thread there are excellent answers to the poster's question, and it could have ended after the first answer.

If someone don't like brand abc or what ever reason ok, but why does that result in an crusade to make everyone else belive the same? Not everyone wants to write with flex, not everyone likes shading and so on....no one is forced to use a brand x pen if he does not like the brand for what reason ever, and why the heck should one partissipate in a thread about a brand he don't like? Ranting?.

I am pleasantly surprised that in such a case here on FPN i have only seen moderate and calm reactions to this coming up.

Imagine how this thread looks to someone new to fountainpens, heaving a similar question and is directed here via an searchengine...

 

 

Well said


PELIKAN - Too many birds in the flock to count.  My pen chest has proven to be a most fertile breeding ground.

fpn_1508261203__fpn_logo_300x150.jpg

THE PELIKAN'S PERCH - A growing reference site for all things Pelikan


#40 Bo Bo Olson

Bo Bo Olson

    Pen Dust

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,388 posts
  • Location:Germany

Posted 15 January 2017 - 17:46

I've heard nothing but good about Indy-Pen-Dance, also.

 

These two are English.

Peter Twydle is the son of Arthur Twydle one of those that held the fort with pen repair back when it was a desert. The equivalent of the American Frank Dubiel. He along with two of his students Marshal and Oldfield were to make the Pen Repair book, but he died. The book is dedicated to him.

Peter has written pen books and repairs pens and runs his father's pen museum.

 

 

John Swobada/Oxnard here on this com....repairs nibs....refuses the name of nibmeister though most think of him as that. For a while the man who ground the Conway Stewart nibs.

 

I don't know if you can get that 18 K nib made more flexible....14 K yes.

 

A CI requires an exact angle of hold done just for your Hand....the way the 800 rests easiest in your hand. Do let it rest where it is comfortable....don't 'force' it to be at 45 degrees just after the big index knuckle, when it would rather be at 40 at the start of the web of the thumb....or wants to rest at 35 degrees in the pit of the web of the thumb.

Stubb might be easier to handle. Either is worth thinking about.

 

I am very glad you have '50's 400-400nn's to fall back on. :thumbup: :happyberet:

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Lam1....I have both a steel and a gold Celebry nib....I think it is an F in the pen is not marked and I'm not going to try to yank a perfectly good working pen apart.

It is a springy nib like my 381 or 200/215/150 nibs.  It is 'thin' clean line writing that was normal with the 200 or M400 of before '98.

 

In a way it's surprising, in it came out first in 1997....the last year the M 400 had a good nib. It could have gotten fat and blobby semi-nail like a '98-modern M400/600 or been a nail like the 800.

Pelikan perhaps coppered it's bet....with the Celebry nib.

 

It seems just thin enough one can post the Celebry. It is a large pen, and metal so is a surprise to me that it can be posted if one wishes.

 

I was given one, the black and chrome one ...steel nib ...a nice true regular flex one. Or I'd not bought the marbled green one; when my grail pen money burnt a hole in my pocket and a flock of Pelikans followed me home from the wharf. I strive to stay away from CC pens...cartridges are so very expensive. (Have always been) Converters have a reputation of not working and hold only a little ink.

Mostly I needle re-fill. I have a small hand full of flea market Converters....but I don't waste any time with them. Don't even know if they fit Pelikan.

 

I ended up with two slightly different  marbled green lacquer CC pens.....both very very nice the 381 (New Classic '92-95 only, Vintara green) and the Celebry 580 (called Emerald Green) '97-2005.

 

I have Amethyst in the black and chrome steel nibbed Celebry and Aquamarine...on some papers a teal, in the Emerald Green 14 K nibbed Celebry.

 

Dominic Rothemel.....has a good site. I learned my 381 was the New Classic and it was a failure....it is a very nice pen. I can recommend either it or the Celebry....if you insist on cartridges. Nice, normal for then thin, springy 'true' regular flex nibs....gold or steel =.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 15 January 2017 - 18:06.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: m1000, m800, m805, pelikan



Sponsored Content




|