Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

The ‘Himalaya’, From Fountain Pen Revolution

fountain pen revolution india acrylic ebonite feed

  • Please log in to reply
107 replies to this topic

#101 sdbruder

sdbruder

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 252 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 12 March 2018 - 01:59

My first 2 Himalaya pens arrived, one extra fine and another stub.
 
IMG_4069.jpg


Sponsored Content

#102 TruthPil

TruthPil

    Flexy obliqueness!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,224 posts
  • Location:Back in the US of A
  • Flag:

Posted 12 March 2018 - 02:02

 

My first 2 Himalaya pens arrived, one extra fine and another stub.
 

 

 

So you're the guy who bought the last of the saffron ones!  :P 

I'm waiting for them to restock and go on sale again. These pens are fantastic!


fpn_1451608922__truthpil_signature_small


#103 sdbruder

sdbruder

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 252 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 12 March 2018 - 14:59

 

So you're the guy who bought the last of the saffron ones!  :P

I'm waiting for them to restock and go on sale again. These pens are fantastic!

 

 

Heh, sorry :)

Only inked up the XF one (exactly the saffron), really liked it, normally I dont like XFs because its common for them to be too toothy, but I liked how it behaved until now.



#104 Jamerelbe

Jamerelbe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,598 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 13 March 2018 - 01:05

 

 

Heh, sorry :)

Only inked up the XF one (exactly the saffron), really liked it, normally I dont like XFs because its common for them to be too toothy, but I liked how it behaved until now.

 

I never used to recommend the FPR Extra-fine nibs - unless you knew how to smooth them yourself - because my experience was that they tended to be a bit sharp.  The last few EF's I've ordered though (both the #5.5s in the Himalaya and, more recently, the #6s in the Darjeeling and redesigned Triveni) have been beautifully smooth and wet.  In fact, I'd almost say I favour the EF for the Himalaya (unless you want flex): it seems to do a great job of 'taming' the otherwise wet ebonite feed...



#105 Arkanabar

Arkanabar

    Ain't I a stinker?

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,589 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 11 March 2019 - 21:11

I now have three Himalayas -- green ebonite stub, green acrylic stub, brown ebonite flex.

I don't use flex much, and I don't do pointed-pen calligraphy.  When I flex my brown Himalaya, I get railroading within one or two letters, and it's a bother to get ink flowing again.  Furthermore, the flow is inconsistent.  It starts out firehose wet, and will dry up over the course of a page or less of writing.  I tend to think it's a feed issue.  My stubs both write really well, and I have an extra stub and feed sitting around that I plan to try in it after Lent.  Or maybe I'll try a different ink.



#106 Intensity

Intensity

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,506 posts
  • Location:U.S.A.
  • Flag:

Posted 17 March 2019 - 08:21

Have you done a very thorough cleaning of the nib and feed of any machining oils remnants? I’ve heard that might help. Ink choice is important too. I’d try some Sailor and J. Herbin inks, for example.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 


#107 A Smug Dill

A Smug Dill

    飽食終日無所用心

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,584 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Flag:

Posted 18 March 2019 - 02:36

The other thing to look at is heat setting the ebonite feed. Maybe it's a little bit off as-is.


Let's give each other due respect, and approach discussion rigorously. I believe we're all peers and equals here as fellow hobbyists, with common interests in the acquisition and use of fountain pens, but no shared values and no obligation to offer each other moral support for one's narrative.

Don't think 'cos I understand, I care
Don't think 'cos I'm talking', we're friends

'6 Underground' by Sneaker Pimps


#108 Intensity

Intensity

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,506 posts
  • Location:U.S.A.
  • Flag:

Posted 05 April 2019 - 20:04

My Himalaya in brown ebonite arrived!  It's my first full ebonite body pen and my first modern "flex nib" pen in one.

 

I am so impressed!  The pen has an understated beauty and is comfortable to hold: just the right size to not be too thin or too small.  Lightweight and thus easy to hold for a long period of time.

 

But the nib!  Wow.  I've used a few vintage pens with highly flexible nibs and currently only have one: a needlepoint-like XXF Wahl Eversharp, but I baby that pen due to its excellent condition and the fact that it uses a sac.  I wouldn't put just any ink into it.  Enter FPR Himalaya with its easily user-replaceable plunger fill converter and overall low cost.  On top of that, the nib is really the star of the show--it's about as good as honest-to-goodness flexible vintage gold nibs I've used.  Excellent pen and nib combination for when one wants to add some greeting card decorative touches or for page titles.

 

I've read about the strong recommendation of flushing this pen really well to clean it from machine oils, so I soaked my pen in gentle detergent solution for a couple hours, including converter cleaning and using a soft clean toothbrush to scrub with detergent between the nib and the feed.  Absolutely no flow issues with my pen, writes really juicy like a good vintage pen--bonus for inks with good sheening properties.  The nib itself is smooth and is very easy to flex without overstressing.  Quick cell phone snap of my initial enthusiastic tests with Krishna Vaikhari ink:

 

NQVRh56.jpg

 

The base line is about Lamy Safari Fine in thickness.  The nib can write upside down quite well in an XXF line--mine happens to be not scratchy when writing upside down.


Edited by Intensity, 05 April 2019 - 20:15.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: fountain pen revolution, india, acrylic, ebonite feed



Sponsored Content




|