Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Ranga Model 3 Duofold "short"

indian fountain pens ranga duofold

  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Texasshipagent

Texasshipagent

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 09 September 2016 - 06:05

I have been an admirer of the Indian variety of pens for a while. There are many pens one can buy, but the simplicity, classic styling, durability as well as serviceable nature and value of the Indian pens attracts me more than most. Thanks to PSP and FPR, well, Noodlers as too, Indian pens have become more accessible. For Noodlers fans, not to kick start the old are they US made or not debate, even if assembled here with a mix of domestic parts, like it or not, Noodlers pens fit in this category and are largely Indian. Although an American invention, ebonite materials have been sourced from India from the beginning and it's a country where everyday people continue to use fountain pens. 

 

Indian pens however are largely cheap and low cost, but there are a number of quality pens in the sub $35 dollar range, and some really fantastic pens in the sub $90 dollar range. In my experience, Noodlers and FPR pens are quite similar, In the middle are Gama's and ASA Pens from ASA in India. Many are rather effective eyedroppers which is for the most part my preferred filling system due to the high ink capacity and superior flow. Personally, I like the Ranga's the most.

 

My first Indian experience was the PSP Ranga Zayante. Since have three PSP Ranga's, two FPR's, three Noodlers, an ASA Genius, the new ASA Nakua and an assortment of cheap Airmails or like that find their way in the box as gifts when buying from Indian. The freebies are nice, I give them to my kids to play and draw with, actually some were not all that bad considering are probably worth a dollar or less. FPR following PSP's lead now has a new US site and ships domestically which offers one to purchase Indian's more in line with the American, gotta have it now shopping experience.

 

Buying a pen direct from India however is more of an adventure and requires a degree of patience. I find, respectfully,that pen collectors at time can be technocratic, and India as a whole can be an imperfect place at times, as such, so can be the pens, hence it's possible shopping for Indian pens is not for everyone.

 

As some back story, I work in commercial shipping, first as a boarding officer, or water clerk as known in some places, for our port agency and in total have spent 21 years working closely with Indians, either on board the ships with Indian officers and sailors that largely populate the worlds merchant trades, or with Indian shipping and commodity firm executives now here later in my career. Overall, it's a culture I know well. It's also a culture that is extremely unique and rich in diversity and history, however a depth in which that not always apparent to the naked eye. Just read the history of the Parsi, one of the many fascinating Indian sub-cultures. Houston where I live is unique as it offers one of the largest East Indian populations in the US to the degree many are now proud to be of Texas-Indian decent as second generations are taking root. You can also some of the best Indian food west of London here in Houston as well, which strikes most as odd, as the typical thought of Houston cuisine is fajitas and steak. Where else outside of India could you find a "Chindian" place to eat ?

 

Largely India is a can do place, because they must do. Indian pens reflect this effort and durability. 

 

The peculiar thing that strikes me about many Indian pens, they are really huge ! Is that an Indian fountain pen in your pocket or are you happy to see me is my common joke to that effect. PSP has done a good job of offering more western taste pens like the Zayante and new Monterrey, but the No. 3 Duofold, or my ASA Nakura are oddly large. Both are typically desk pens for me as a result.

 

The Duofold style, like Pelikan is one of the more classic and timeless fountain pen designs. One day when i have $500-1000 to spare, I may actually get a nice Parker Duofold restoration. But the stock No. 3, although classical Duofold design, is just too big, I don't even have dress shirts with pockets deep enough. In meetings people ask if it's a mini baton or a pen :). But I love it and use it at my desk daily.

 

This time I decided to buy a No. 3 direct from Ranga via Amazon in hope of breaking the size issue. With all Indian direct purchases, they ship registered Indian airmail and are generally made to order. So your never quite sure when it will ship and when it will arrive, but typically seems to be 4-6 weeks. It's not terribly clear how to select options via Amazon. So I ordered it and made a remark that I wanted a Blue Mottled ebonite if possible, which was not listed as an option, a silver clip, and ordered the Jowo nib with a Schmidt k-5 converter. The same type of pen I ordered from PSP and received in 4 days for slightly more, $69 and free shipping via Amazon.

 

But this time I made a note, that if they could, I would like it about 3/4 of an inch shorter. I receive a prompt and friendly confirmation, "yes sir, we will gladly make your pen". I was not terribly sure if my options were available, when it would ship, when it would arrive but with past experiences, had faith in the process. That was August 4th, Today Sept 9th this hard traveled, well packaged, hand addressed pen box arrived to my office from India.

 

So this really awesome "short" Duofold No. 3 was in the box, as was the standard cheap eyedropper gift pen.It's slightly larger than my ASA Genius. Wonderfully polished blue mottled ebonite and wrote fantastically our of the box as do most pens with JoWo nibs. ASA's are nice, but the Ranga's are just a but better finished.

 

Here are some photos. Ranga lists the No.3 as 6'' in length capped, PSP lists it as 5 3/16'', my measurement was 5 7/8'', as explained, they are all handmade, so may vary somewhat. This pen is 5/8 of an inch shorter at a capped length 5 1/8'' of which may not sound like much, but it's a major difference. Posted the stock No. 3 is a monstrous 7 1/2'' where this one is 6 1/2'' . Unposted, which is my preference in writing, the short is 5'' where the stock No. 3 is 5 1/2''. You can see in the photos the lower section is the same, as are the diameters, but has a shorter threading, shorter cap and barrel. You get one turn less than the stock no, 3 when capping, and the threads are really snug but will wear in over time. It's just short enough to have that true Duofold appearance, just long enough to be comfortable unposted, and does not look like a freak of nature posted.

 

Am using the converter for now, but soon it will be eyedropped like my others, the firm and deep thread seat on the caps and lower sections of these pens with a little silicon never leak. Only issue was on the larger stock no. 3 the barrel is so huge in volume, burping can be an issue at times.

 

I am sure they would make it in acrylic, but there is just something proper about ebonite for fountain pens. You can also order it eyedropper only with an ebonite feed and fit a better quality nib on it aftermarket at a later stage. The Indian ebonite feed eyedroppers typically have a large and deeply seated feed.

 

I could not be happier, I may never actually buy that old Parker. Maybe a longer review than most, but Ranga just made my day, a custom ebonite Duofold, for $69 !! Not to knock the US turners, but same quality customs pen also with a JoWo nib could cost you well north of $150 dollars.

 

So please, if you have not tried one, get and Indian pen, either from a US source, or don't be afraid to shop in Indian directly. Although slower, the service from Ranga, FPR and ASA has been fantastic in each instance. 

 

Happy Writing.

 

file.jpeg file1.jpeg file2.jpeg file3.jpeg file4.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Sponsored Content

#2 sannidh

sannidh

    Finding Eternity

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 946 posts
  • Location:The Milky Way
  • Flag:

Posted 09 September 2016 - 16:48

Thank you for sharing : both the review and your tales around Indian culture :)

Thoroughly enjoyed reading this!


You have come to earth to entertain and to be entertained - P.Y

 

Some Pen & Paraphernalia Reviews


#3 Lelouch

Lelouch

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 170 posts
  • Location:Connecticut
  • Flag:

Posted 11 September 2016 - 04:37

Wonderful review, I've been eyeing the model 3 for a while. I really like the shorter length that you chose. Now if I can get one with a section shaped more comfortably for me (see a Swan Eternal 46), then I'd be interested in ordering 3 or 4 XD

#4 mpkandan

mpkandan

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 931 posts

Posted 11 September 2016 - 11:19

I have been an admirer of the Indian variety of pens for a while. There are many pens one can buy, but the simplicity, classic styling, durability as well as serviceable nature and value of the Indian pens attracts me more than most. Thanks to PSP and FPR, well, Noodlers as too, Indian pens have become more accessible. For Noodlers fans, not to kick start the old are they US made or not debate, even if assembled here with a mix of domestic parts, like it or not, Noodlers pens fit in this category and are largely Indian. Although an American invention, ebonite materials have been sourced from India from the beginning and it's a country where everyday people continue to use fountain pens. 

 

Indian pens however are largely cheap and low cost, but there are a number of quality pens in the sub $35 dollar range, and some really fantastic pens in the sub $90 dollar range. In my experience, Noodlers and FPR pens are quite similar, In the middle are Gama's and ASA Pens from ASA in India. Many are rather effective eyedroppers which is for the most part my preferred filling system due to the high ink capacity and superior flow. Personally, I like the Ranga's the most.

 

My first Indian experience was the PSP Ranga Zayante. Since have three PSP Ranga's, two FPR's, three Noodlers, an ASA Genius, the new ASA Nakua and an assortment of cheap Airmails or like that find their way in the box as gifts when buying from Indian. The freebies are nice, I give them to my kids to play and draw with, actually some were not all that bad considering are probably worth a dollar or less. FPR following PSP's lead now has a new US site and ships domestically which offers one to purchase Indian's more in line with the American, gotta have it now shopping experience.

 

Buying a pen direct from India however is more of an adventure and requires a degree of patience. I find, respectfully,that pen collectors at time can be technocratic, and India as a whole can be an imperfect place at times, as such, so can be the pens, hence it's possible shopping for Indian pens is not for everyone.

 

As some back story, I work in commercial shipping, first as a boarding officer, or water clerk as known in some places, for our port agency and in total have spent 21 years working closely with Indians, either on board the ships with Indian officers and sailors that largely populate the worlds merchant trades, or with Indian shipping and commodity firm executives now here later in my career. Overall, it's a culture I know well. It's also a culture that is extremely unique and rich in diversity and history, however a depth in which that not always apparent to the naked eye. Just read the history of the Parsi, one of the many fascinating Indian sub-cultures. Houston where I live is unique as it offers one of the largest East Indian populations in the US to the degree many are now proud to be of Texas-Indian decent as second generations are taking root. You can also some of the best Indian food west of London here in Houston as well, which strikes most as odd, as the typical thought of Houston cuisine is fajitas and steak. Where else outside of India could you find a "Chindian" place to eat ?

 

Largely India is a can do place, because they must do. Indian pens reflect this effort and durability. 

 

The peculiar thing that strikes me about many Indian pens, they are really huge ! Is that an Indian fountain pen in your pocket or are you happy to see me is my common joke to that effect. PSP has done a good job of offering more western taste pens like the Zayante and new Monterrey, but the No. 3 Duofold, or my ASA Nakura are oddly large. Both are typically desk pens for me as a result.

 

The Duofold style, like Pelikan is one of the more classic and timeless fountain pen designs. One day when i have $500-1000 to spare, I may actually get a nice Parker Duofold restoration. But the stock No. 3, although classical Duofold design, is just too big, I don't even have dress shirts with pockets deep enough. In meetings people ask if it's a mini baton or a pen :). But I love it and use it at my desk daily.

 

This time I decided to buy a No. 3 direct from Ranga via Amazon in hope of breaking the size issue. With all Indian direct purchases, they ship registered Indian airmail and are generally made to order. So your never quite sure when it will ship and when it will arrive, but typically seems to be 4-6 weeks. It's not terribly clear how to select options via Amazon. So I ordered it and made a remark that I wanted a Blue Mottled ebonite if possible, which was not listed as an option, a silver clip, and ordered the Jowo nib with a Schmidt k-5 converter. The same type of pen I ordered from PSP and received in 4 days for slightly more, $69 and free shipping via Amazon.

 

But this time I made a note, that if they could, I would like it about 3/4 of an inch shorter. I receive a prompt and friendly confirmation, "yes sir, we will gladly make your pen". I was not terribly sure if my options were available, when it would ship, when it would arrive but with past experiences, had faith in the process. That was August 4th, Today Sept 9th this hard traveled, well packaged, hand addressed pen box arrived to my office from India.

 

So this really awesome "short" Duofold No. 3 was in the box, as was the standard cheap eyedropper gift pen.It's slightly larger than my ASA Genius. Wonderfully polished blue mottled ebonite and wrote fantastically our of the box as do most pens with JoWo nibs. ASA's are nice, but the Ranga's are just a but better finished.

 

Here are some photos. Ranga lists the No.3 as 6'' in length capped, PSP lists it as 5 3/16'', my measurement was 5 7/8'', as explained, they are all handmade, so may vary somewhat. This pen is 5/8 of an inch shorter at a capped length 5 1/8'' of which may not sound like much, but it's a major difference. Posted the stock No. 3 is a monstrous 7 1/2'' where this one is 6 1/2'' . Unposted, which is my preference in writing, the short is 5'' where the stock No. 3 is 5 1/2''. You can see in the photos the lower section is the same, as are the diameters, but has a shorter threading, shorter cap and barrel. You get one turn less than the stock no, 3 when capping, and the threads are really snug but will wear in over time. It's just short enough to have that true Duofold appearance, just long enough to be comfortable unposted, and does not look like a freak of nature posted.

 

Am using the converter for now, but soon it will be eyedropped like my others, the firm and deep thread seat on the caps and lower sections of these pens with a little silicon never leak. Only issue was on the larger stock no. 3 the barrel is so huge in volume, burping can be an issue at times.

 

I am sure they would make it in acrylic, but there is just something proper about ebonite for fountain pens. You can also order it eyedropper only with an ebonite feed and fit a better quality nib on it aftermarket at a later stage. The Indian ebonite feed eyedroppers typically have a large and deeply seated feed.

 

I could not be happier, I may never actually buy that old Parker. Maybe a longer review than most, but Ranga just made my day, a custom ebonite Duofold, for $69 !! Not to knock the US turners, but same quality customs pen also with a JoWo nib could cost you well north of $150 dollars.

 

So please, if you have not tried one, get and Indian pen, either from a US source, or don't be afraid to shop in Indian directly. Although slower, the service from Ranga, FPR and ASA has been fantastic in each instance. 

 

Happy Writing.

 

attachicon.giffile.jpegattachicon.giffile1.jpegattachicon.giffile2.jpegattachicon.giffile3.jpegattachicon.giffile4.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Mr. Texasshipagent Sir,

 

  Thanks a lot for your great review and pictures . Glad that you love the pen very much.

 

Regards,

Kandan.M.P

Ranga Pen Company



#5 terim

terim

    Antique

  • Premium - Ruby

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,766 posts
  • Location:Santa Cruz, CA
  • Flag:

Posted 24 September 2016 - 15:06

You might have seen a typo in the model 3 measurement, we mean to say 5-13/16" in length.

We put together a page of measurements that might help:

http://www.peytonstr...ranga-selection

Teri
Teri Morris, PEYTON STREET PENS

Visit the Peyton Street Pens web site.

Instagram for Peyton Street Pens
We list new pens on the web site daily ....here's a link to the very latest additions.

#6 mehandiratta

mehandiratta

    Museum Piece

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,137 posts
  • Location:Gurgaon, Delhi NCR
  • Flag:

Posted 24 September 2016 - 19:19

Lovely Pen...

Thoroughly enjoyed your experience of the pen...


vaibhav mehandiratta                               

architect & fountain pen connoisseur 

 

wordpress blog | instagram | twitter


#7 IndigoBOB

IndigoBOB

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 02 December 2017 - 11:05

I love your pen.  

 

I have a question.  Would you by any chance know the diameter of the section at its narrowest?


Edited by IndigoBOB, 02 December 2017 - 11:13.

A voice:  I'll write pages and pages, days upon days, to be able to breathe out a few lines,

I'll do whatever it takes to breathe out those few lines, where the breath breathes out on its own, in on its own,

To thine own...

...breath on its own.


#8 Jamerelbe

Jamerelbe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,975 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 02 December 2017 - 11:22

I love your pen.  

 

I have a question.  Would you by any chance know the diameter of the section at its narrowest?

 

If it's any help, my older Ranga 'Duofold' has a grip section diameter that tapers from ~12.5mm just below the threads to ~11mm towards the nib; my more recent #3 pen tapers from ~12.5mm down to 10.5mm.  From the look of it, the Duofold 'Short' being reviewed here would have similar dimensions - it's only the length of the barrel that's been altered.



#9 Sagarb

Sagarb

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 614 posts
  • Location:Kolkata
  • Flag:

Posted 03 December 2017 - 02:10

Nice review..the model is very much identical to Franklin Christoph Model 03 Iterum..if I am not wrong..


Sagar Bhowmick


#10 IndigoBOB

IndigoBOB

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 03 December 2017 - 04:48

I just found this model, too, and it intrigues me quite a bit.  

 

Picked up my first Ebonite from FPR and liked it so much I've become curious about others...  that aren't so large.


Edited by IndigoBOB, 03 December 2017 - 04:49.

A voice:  I'll write pages and pages, days upon days, to be able to breathe out a few lines,

I'll do whatever it takes to breathe out those few lines, where the breath breathes out on its own, in on its own,

To thine own...

...breath on its own.


#11 Jamerelbe

Jamerelbe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,975 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 03 December 2017 - 05:19

I just found this model, too, and it intrigues me quite a bit.  

 

Picked up my first Ebonite from FPR and liked it so much I've become curious about others...  that aren't so large.

 

I purchased a clipless Ranga Model 8 in a Group Buy last year - it's about 1cm longer than a TWSBI Eco, but tapers to a point at top and bottom and is a little slimmer in the hand.  The Model 4 I bought before that is a similar size but with more rounded ends, and just a touch girthier.  I like then both a lot - more than my Model 3 - though paradoxically I also REALLY like my Jumbo Model 5!



#12 IndigoBOB

IndigoBOB

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 04 December 2017 - 01:12

 

I purchased a clipless Ranga Model 8 in a Group Buy last year - it's about 1cm longer than a TWSBI Eco, but tapers to a point at top and bottom and is a little slimmer in the hand.  The Model 4 I bought before that is a similar size but with more rounded ends, and just a touch girthier.  I like then both a lot - more than my Model 3 - though paradoxically I also REALLY like my Jumbo Model 5!

 

I'd prefer to buy a smaller sized ebonite pen at the moment.  I'm not a fan of oversized pens now...  though maybe I'll work my way up to it.  I'd imagine the slight weight added in the back could add a different feel and comfort but right now I like pens that fit my hand well and don't take up too much space.

 

The model 4 does look nice.  I like the lip at the end of the section, which is why I'd like to try this "Short" version of this Model 3 Duofold. 

 

I would actually buy the Zayante, which is closer to the size I'm looking for, but this design of the Model 3-"Short" has intrigued me as much and even a little more.


A voice:  I'll write pages and pages, days upon days, to be able to breathe out a few lines,

I'll do whatever it takes to breathe out those few lines, where the breath breathes out on its own, in on its own,

To thine own...

...breath on its own.


#13 amk

amk

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,614 posts
  • Location:Norwich, UK
  • Flag:

Posted 04 December 2017 - 09:48

What a lovely review. I never knew there was an Indian community in Texas. You'll have to share your recommendations on Chindian restaurants!

 

I find Indian pens, because of their light construction, can be twice the size of some of my modern Pelikans or Watermans and still be more comfortable to use. I have a couple of monsters from Ranga which look, as you say, like mini batons, but are really easy to write with.


Too many pens, too little time!

http://fountainpenlove.blogspot.fr/


#14 Jamerelbe

Jamerelbe

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,975 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 December 2017 - 13:04



 

I'd prefer to buy a smaller sized ebonite pen at the moment.  I'm not a fan of oversized pens now...  though maybe I'll work my way up to it.  I'd imagine the slight weight added in the back could add a different feel and comfort but right now I like pens that fit my hand well and don't take up too much space.

 

The model 4 does look nice.  I like the lip at the end of the section, which is why I'd like to try this "Short" version of this Model 3 Duofold. 

 

I would actually buy the Zayante, which is closer to the size I'm looking for, but this design of the Model 3-"Short" has intrigued me as much and even a little more.

 

No worries - just to give you some comparisons, here are (most of) my Ranga ebonite pens, compared to the FPR Himalaya.

 

From top to bottom:

Model 5

Model 3

Bamboo (standard, not oversized)

Model 4

Model 8

Model 2 / Cruiser

FPR Himalaya (green ebonite)

 

fpn_1512478838__rangapalooza.jpg



#15 IndigoBOB

IndigoBOB

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 December 2017 - 07:28

That picture says a lot!

 

I actually ordered the Ranga Zayante.  I like how the grip flattens then flares out towards the end.

 

And I have found that with my FPR himalaya-ebonite I like to choke up and grip the pen higher with this ebonite material.  So I actually may not invest in this short model later on, but try something larger.

 

I was looking at the ASA I CAN and Maya.

 

The Darn ebonite is expanding my fountain pen world and preferences.


A voice:  I'll write pages and pages, days upon days, to be able to breathe out a few lines,

I'll do whatever it takes to breathe out those few lines, where the breath breathes out on its own, in on its own,

To thine own...

...breath on its own.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: indian fountain pens, ranga, duofold



Sponsored Content




|