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Left Handed Overwriter, Currently Lamy 2000, Wanting A More Classically Styled Pen.

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#1 johanbergman

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 12:20

Hello,

 

I´ve been using fountain pens daily for a couple of years. First I had a Montblanc 592. A flea market find that wrote like a dream and got me into FP´s. Later I found an ST Dupont, gilt sterling silver one (I don´t know the model name) that also worked very well. The first pen I bought new was a Lamy 2000. I´ve used it daily for 2-3 years and it is a great pen for me. It has never ever failed to put ink on a paper when I want it to. Not once. Being a left handed overwriter, I use a lot of push writing and I´ve found that some nibs work better than others for me. For instance I owned a Visconti van Gogh, an early example with a very beautiful and springy nib (compared to the Lamy 2000). And it didn´t work very well for me. 

 

I now want to buy a more classically styled pen (compared to the Lamy) and I am considering something along the lines of the Pelikan M800 or Montblanc 146. Do you think they would be too springy for me? Are there alternatives, classically styled pens with the same quality and styling with a nib better suited  for me? A Lamy 2000 nib in a meisterstuck package, if you will?

 

Any and all help will be much appreciated!



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#2 gweimer1

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 13:01

Join the club.  For us lefties, I find that a hooded nib covers some of the needs pretty well.  Given some of your pens, I think you'd be very happy with a nice Parker 51.



#3 carlos.q

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 15:32

A modern Pelikan M800/805 nib is not springy at all.

#4 sandy101

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 15:40

Italix Parson's Essential. Not in the same price league as the M800, but it has the classic cigar shape and comes with a beautifully tuned nib.



#5 Mech-for-i

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 15:46

you know , I think the notion that leftie need a different pen is a myth , just look at all the classical pens out there, they are symmetrical along the axis .. and this goes for the nibs too ( unless you talk italic oblique ). So feel free to browse the various catalog. 



#6 pajaro

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 15:55

Left handed overwriter myself. The Montblanc 146 or a Pelikan are among pens I have enjoyed. The Parker 51 is at least as good, and I still use the one I bought in 1970.

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#7 ac12

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 17:48

If you PUSH a lot, then you need to lighten up your hand so you are not putting much if any downward pressure on the pen.  This reduces the friction of the pen against the paper.  This is very similar to me writing with a pointed dip pen.  If I am not light with my hand the nib will scratch and snag on the cross and up-strokes.  So writing lightly is definitely something that can be learned.

 

Second is to use SMOOTH paper.  The smoother the paper the less friction the nib will have, and the easier your push strokes will be.  This is easy at home, but at work, you are generally stuck with whatever they have.

 

Third, is the nib itself.  In general, the wider the nib size, the smoother the pen will write, as there is more tipping area for the pens weight to spread over.  Also a wider nib is less sensitive to the texture of the paper surface.


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#8 torstar

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 18:03

Pelikan 800 and MB 146s have been enjoyed by this lefty.

 

A left-footed oblique nib is the only thing I have had difficulty with.

 

Each new pen takes some time to find the sweet spot without thinking about it, for the obliques it was taking days to make the adjustment.



#9 pajaro

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 19:00

If you PUSH a lot, then you need to lighten up your hand so you are not putting much if any downward pressure on the pen.  This reduces the friction of the pen against the paper.  This is very similar to me writing with a pointed dip pen.  If I am not light with my hand the nib will scratch and snag on the cross and up-strokes.  So writing lightly is definitely something that can be learned.

 

Second is to use SMOOTH paper.  The smoother the paper the less friction the nib will have, and the easier your push strokes will be.  This is easy at home, but at work, you are generally stuck with whatever they have.

 

Third, is the nib itself.  In general, the wider the nib size, the smoother the pen will write, as there is more tipping area for the pens weight to spread over.  Also a wider nib is less sensitive to the texture of the paper surface.

 

The trouble with a wide nib for a lefty is that they tend to write wetter and your writing hand is passing over the ink.  Fine Pelikan, Montblanc and Parker 51 nibs are smooth if they are in good condition and aren't misaligned.  My old Parker 51 fine is very smooth. 


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#10 torstar

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 14:23

 

The trouble with a wide nib for a lefty is that they tend to write wetter and your writing hand is passing over the ink.  Fine Pelikan, Montblanc and Parker 51 nibs are smooth if they are in good condition and aren't misaligned.  My old Parker 51 fine is very smooth. 

 

That's why we underwrite 1-5" below the ink, or overwrite like the OP says.



#11 torstar

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 14:25

I usually assume the higher the K of the gold the less it will spring.

 

an 18K Pelikan 800 writes like a nail, as does a Waterman Edson



#12 sandy101

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 15:10

I usually assume the higher the K of the gold the less it will spring.

 

an 18K Pelikan 800 writes like a nail, as does a Waterman Edson

 

I don't think so. The Platinum 18K nibs are springy, but the Cross 18K is not. I guess the thickness of the material will also influence the springiness.


Edited by sandy101, 08 September 2016 - 15:10.


#13 ac12

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 17:11

<script src="http://local.ptron/W...n.js"></script>

 

I usually assume the higher the K of the gold the less it will spring.

 

an 18K Pelikan 800 writes like a nail, as does a Waterman Edson

 

All depends on the design of the nib.

You can have a gold NAIL at any level.

 

However the higher the K number the purer the gold.  24k is pure/100% gold, and too soft for many applications, hence the use of gold alloy as in 14k gold.  14k gold is part gold and part some other mix of metals.


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#14 torstar

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 17:40

Fair enough, I will revise my assumptions on springyness and K.

 

(it really isn't that big a deal to me regarding spring in a nib...)



#15 pajaro

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 20:08

 

That's why we underwrite 1-5" below the ink, or overwrite like the OP says.

 

I don't see how this helps when over writing.  I just write slowly.


"Don't hurry, don't worry. It's better to be late at the Golden Gate than to arrive in Hell on time."
--Sign in a bar and grill, Ormond Beach, Florida, 1960.

 

They took the blue from the skies and the pretty girls' eyes and a touch of Old Glory too . . .


#16 torstar

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 20:13

 

I don't see how this helps when over writing.  I just write slowly.

 

Just a natural reflex to stay out of the ink, I don't recall getting hit with a ruler by Sister Marie or anything.

 

Started in the early 70s when lefties were allowed, the teacher stood and stared and told the class i was dragging my hand through the pencil marks that I just left on the page.

 

i laughed and enjoyed the attention, that could have been a fatal moment for self-esteem...  :D



#17 sidthecat

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 20:23

I have a light touch...arguably too light, so I look for flex. The kind of nib that will flex if you blow on it. It's a sickness.

#18 ac12

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Posted 08 September 2016 - 20:51

<script src="http://local.ptron/W...n.js"></script>

 

I have a light touch...arguably too light, so I look for flex. The kind of nib that will flex if you blow on it. It's a sickness.

 

Oh you gotta try some of the dip pen nibs.

It WILL spoil you.

And some of those nib are not even marked or originally sold as flex nibs.


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#19 johanbergman

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 08:54

So, can I assume an M800 or M805 will be enough of a nail for me, then? I will have to order one! Maybe. Yes. No. Yes. Ad infinitum.



#20 wastelanded

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 01:37

I write the same way as you: you should be all right with a modern M80x.

Yeah, the pushing. I'm training my right hand to write, just so I can use all those mouthwatering flexy nibs. Currently I'm at the preschool stage of cursive.
"I was cut off from the world. There was no one to confuse or torment me, and I was forced to become original." - Franz Joseph Haydn 1732 - 1809





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