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Montblanc 146 Vs 149 And Hand Fatigue

montblanc 146 149 pen fatigue

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#21 cellmatrix

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 18:39

You may be able to benefit from a little exercise.  I did, though not for writing.  My grip strength had atrophied.  

 

I found this el-cheapo machine working muscles deep into my palm as well as the fingers. 

 

I write with heavy sterling pens.  My ideas wear out before my hands do.  Interestingly, I found that I have large differentials among fingers in strength. I also think it improved my coordination by forcing my fingers to act more independently, as in the picture.  That hand model is going to get a powerful middle-finger if he keeps it up. 

 

 

 

Simply hanging from a pull up bar or other tall object is far better at building up your grip compared to these little spring loaded gizmos.



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#22 Old Salt

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 00:33

I go between my 146 and 149. Love them of both. But I prefer a fat pen. My hands seem not to tire as fast and they are just very comfortable in my hand...
I also love to write with the Jinhao 159's with original and Goulet nibs. An additional fatty that I really love is the Laban Mento. Outside its almost identical to a 149. It's a resin body with no piston assembly so it's a little lighter than a 149. It's a CC filler, Takes #6 nibs, can easily be broken down, and is a fraction of the cost of a 149. You can get one for around $98.
The Montblanc 149 is by far the most excellent pen. But the others can be a lot of fun and won't be quite as painful if you drop or lose them.

#23 jar

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 00:58

On hand fatigue and ergonomics.

 

While size often makes a difference there is more to ergonomics than simply size.  Some things to look for that may make a big difference are often never mentioned.

 

It is the section width and profile that is really important. 

 

A longer section offers a better chance to change grip than a shorter profile and a concave section allows greater control with less pressure than a flat or convex section.

 

A pen that balances with just slight downward tilt will usually cause less fatigue than one that is back heavy. 

 

While lighter is often better it is balance that is the greater factor.  If the pen sits in a neutral mode between finger and webbing it will cause less fatigue than one when you need to grip to maintain control. 

 

Finally tip design is also important, a rounded Kugel nib is likely to cause less fatigue and be more forgiving of slight rotations than a more aggressive profile like oblique or italic.


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#24 Nathanb

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 03:08

I use both in my daily rotation and reserve the 149 for shorter bursts of writing - i don't post either. 



#25 Monbla

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 03:31

Unless you like to write with a nail, albeit a smooth nail, I would suggest ANY vintage MB made before 1969. They ALL had smooth, flexible nibs, except for the stenographic models, that add personality to your writing! All of them came with a bullet proof piston filler system that held a relatively large amount of ink based on the barrel size of course !! Even their student grade pens, the Monte Rossa's of the '50s/'60s are well made, good writing pens. My advice is to stay with vintage MB's!!   :) 



#26 Behike54

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 08:33

Superb comments with sage advice!

 

Thanks!


“My tastes are simple: I am easily satisfied with the best.”  -   Winston Churchill

#27 Ghost Plane

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 13:52

The older 14k nibs certainly have a softer feel than the 18k if you have an opportunity. But the difference is similar to preferring the softer suspension of a Rolls or Bentley to the firmer suspension of a Ferrari or Maserati. Both are superb in their own way.



#28 Behike54

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 16:22

Ended up selling my 146s and focusing on 149s as the 146 caused hand cramps after a few hours. They're simply to short and narrow for my back of the section stance. I can get 8 hours or more from the 149s without cramping. My hands are relatively small for a woman, so preferences for fat, long pens have nothing to do with hand size.

There's nothing wrong with investing in used pens as users. I've gotten my best nibs that way.


GP, this post sealed the deal for me regarding the 149. It is my experience as well, that holding a smaller pen, or even a pencil, for some reason forces me hand to clench or tighten. FPs in general have helped this, but as I think about it, the bigger pans have always suited me best!

Thanks!


“My tastes are simple: I am easily satisfied with the best.”  -   Winston Churchill

#29 torstar

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 16:51

Grateful my next designation has gone to computer-only, for Word and Excel, for exams

 

I've lost all ability to write in an exam frenzy over the past decades, 4 hours would be unbearable in a month for me.



#30 Ghost Plane

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 19:47

GP, this post sealed the deal for me regarding the 149. It is my experience as well, that holding a smaller pen, or even a pencil, for some reason forces me hand to clench or tighten. FPs in general have helped this, but as I think about it, the bigger pans have always suited me best!
Thanks!


Doing a happy dance that I could be of help. May your marathon sessions be as effortless as mine.





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