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Which Nib To Try First?

m2 assortment 164

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48 replies to this topic

#1 teryg93

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 14:28

I have my first Estie--an M2, which seems like it will fit my hand. I've been unable to try it because it arrived with a severely bent nib.

 

Not being familiar with pens with changeable nibs, I picked up a pack of 12 nibs on ebay. It includes the 314 Relief nib, the 788 Oval Point, the 322 Inflexible, the 128 Extra Fine Elastic, the 048 Falcon, and the 442 Jackson Stub. As I read about each different nib, I thought, "That's the one I'll try first." So, I have no idea which to try first. I'm leaning a bit toward the 128 because I don't have any other extra fine nibs and I want to see what they mean by elastic, but I'm really not sure at all.

 

Which of these nibs would you try first?

 

My objective at the moment is just to see if I like the feel and weight of the pen in my hand. I have small hands, so most pens feel too bulky and heavy to me.

 

Thanks!



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#2 Hobiwan

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 17:56

Congrats on your first Esterbrook.  From the numbers you've listed, it appears you have dip pen points, instead of the screw-in Renew points that are required for fountain pens.  If you go to

 

http://www.esterbroo...tructions.shtml

 

you'll see instructions that show the pen and its Renew point separated.  Unscrew your bad point from the pen.  If it's tight, soak in warm water to loosen any dried ink.  You can then see how the replacement works. 

 

HTH


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Paul


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#3 ac12

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 19:22

If the nib is STUCK TIGHT in the section, you may have to soak it for a LONG time, to dissolve the hardened ink.   I use an UltraSonic Cleaner (USC), without an USC it could take days of soaking and water changing.  Be patient, it took decades to get like that.


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#4 teryg93

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 20:55

Congrats on your first Esterbrook.  From the numbers you've listed, it appears you have dip pen points, instead of the screw-in Renew points that are required for fountain pens.  If you go to

 

http://www.esterbroo...tructions.shtml

 

you'll see instructions that show the pen and its Renew point separated.  Unscrew your bad point from the pen.  If it's tight, soak in warm water to loosen any dried ink.  You can then see how the replacement works. 

 

HTH

 

Darn. I've never had any type of fountain pen with a changeable nib before. I thought an Estie nib was an Estie nib. Maybe I can find someone who might need these. Too bad. I was looking forward to trying a range of nibs.

At the risk of sounding like a dummy, how can you tell which nibs are for fountain pens? Are they higher numbers or something easy like that?


 



#5 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 21:33

Darn. I've never had any type of fountain pen with a changeable nib before. I thought an Estie nib was an Estie nib. Maybe I can find someone who might need these. Too bad. I was looking forward to trying a range of nibs.
At the risk of sounding like a dummy, how can you tell which nibs are for fountain pens? Are they higher numbers or something easy like that?


They'll be attached to the feed as an entire assembly and will have a threaded section below the nib/feed. There are pictures somewhere, I know...

You might want to hold on to those dip nibs and get a dip pen body for them. They could be fun to play with.

#6 teryg93

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 21:51

They'll be attached to the feed as an entire assembly and will have a threaded section below the nib/feed. There are pictures somewhere, I know...

You might want to hold on to those dip nibs and get a dip pen body for them. They could be fun to play with.

 

Thanks, and you might be right about the dip pen. Down the road a bit, but I'm starting into calligraphy, so who knows . . .

Where do people get Estie fountain pen nibs? Google gives me Anderson Pens, but they're out of almost everything.

 



 



#7 gweimer1

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 22:05

I can help you, with a limited selection, if you like fine nibs.  As you learn more about the Esterbrook pens, you'll find that many of us have found our best nib deals with pens attached.



#8 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 22:08

Thanks, and you might be right about the dip pen. Down the road a bit, but I'm starting into calligraphy, so who knows . . .
Where do people get Estie fountain pen nibs? Google gives me Anderson Pens, but they're out of almost everything.



Apart from fleabay....(and don't overlook a cheap Estie that may be a 'parts pen' if it has a good nib)....I'm not sure. Peyton Street Pens? Flea market and junk stores? Classifieds here? Sometimes even the fountain pen nibs are sold in lots.

I feel like I should know this, having just recently gone in for learning to repair these. Hope it helped at least a little.

#9 ScienceChick

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 22:17

Brian Anderson usually has a good selection of nibs, especially the 2xxx nibs. There's nothing wrong with 2xxx nibs and they're less expensive than the 9xxx nibs. Check 'em out.

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#10 teryg93

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 22:18

Apart from fleabay....(and don't overlook a cheap Estie that may be a 'parts pen' if it has a good nib)....I'm not sure. Peyton Street Pens? Flea market and junk stores? Classifieds here? Sometimes even the fountain pen nibs are sold in lots.

I feel like I should know this, having just recently gone in for learning to repair these. Hope it helped at least a little.

 

Ebay is what got me in trouble last time. i bought a box listed as Esterbrook fountain pen nibs. I should have known from the price that something was not right.

 

I'll keep an eye there to see what pops up. I know--me and everybody else :)



#11 teryg93

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 22:19

I can help you, with a limited selection, if you like fine nibs.  As you learn more about the Esterbrook pens, you'll find that many of us have found our best nib deals with pens attached.

 

Fine is most likely what I'll like. It's what I prefer on my other fountain pens. What would you recommend I start with from what you have available?



#12 teryg93

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 23:00

I hope I got the right thing this time. I went to Anderson Pens nibs, selected Esterbrook, selected fountain pen, and bought 2 of the only kind they had left. They're fine nibs, but that's what I'll probably like anyway. I might try some different nibs once they get new stock in.



#13 teryg93

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 23:01

I can help you, with a limited selection, if you like fine nibs.  As you learn more about the Esterbrook pens, you'll find that many of us have found our best nib deals with pens attached.

 

Thanks. These seem to be hard to come by, so I don't want to reduce your collection. I was able to buy a couple from Anderson Pens. Good thing I like fine, since that's all they had in stock!



#14 Hobiwan

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 23:54

Just a bit of background info ...

 

In some cases, Esterbrook used its base line of dip pen points, which they started making in 1858, to morph into the Renew Points for its American fountain pen line started in 1932.  So, the 442 Jackson Stub you have is the 2442 in the Renew Point; the 128 becomes 2128 and 9128 in Renew points.  The 314 Relief became the 1314, then later the 2314-F and 9314-F (fine), -M (medium) and -B (broad) series, etc.  

 

  The 2048/9048 and 2128/9128 points are "flexible" fine and extra fine points (some writers say "not very flexible"), and they are in higher demand than, say, the 2550/9550 rigid fine points.  I know, for instance, a present-time graphic artist who uses both types (dip and fountain-pen) fixed with both x048 and x128s for his work.  

 

You'll find that opinions vary on how they all perform, so you just have to feel them out for yourself, and see what suits you. 

 

I'm a straight medium-point writer myself, having no ability or patience to do calligraphy writing, and I admire those who have that wonderful talent.


Best Regards
Paul


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#15 gweimer1

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 00:59

 

Fine is most likely what I'll like. It's what I prefer on my other fountain pens. What would you recommend I start with from what you have available?

 

I have a 9556 NOS nib that I can sell you lower than just about anyone.



#16 teryg93

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 02:38

 

I have a 9556 NOS nib that I can sell you lower than just about anyone.

 

Thanks. I think I want to see what I think of the pen when I write with it. I ordered a couple of nibs from Anderson. I don't know how good they'll be but they'll give me a sense of the weight and thickness of the pen when I use it. I'll know more in a few days.



#17 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 10:47

Thanks. I think I want to see what I think of the pen when I write with it. I ordered a couple of nibs from Anderson. I don't know how good they'll be but they'll give me a sense of the weight and thickness of the pen when I use it. I'll know more in a few days.



When it arrives, I'd like to see an update. And maybe then you can look into straightening the 'other' nib. ;)

#18 teryg93

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 17:37

When it arrives, I'd like to see an update. And maybe then you can look into straightening the 'other' nib. ;)

 

The nibs have shipped, so it should be soon. It never occurred to me to try to straighten the other nib. If I could do that, then I could play with the pen today! Youtube, here I come . . .



#19 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 17:56

The nibs have shipped, so it should be soon. It never occurred to me to try to straighten the other nib. If I could do that, then I could play with the pen today! Youtube, here I come . . .


Slowwwlyyyy, in teeny increments.

#20 pajaro

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 18:03

 

The nibs have shipped, so it should be soon. It never occurred to me to try to straighten the other nib. If I could do that, then I could play with the pen today! Youtube, here I come . . .

 

If those nibs are dip pen nibs, as the numbers suggest, you are still a ways from solving the nib issue. 


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