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British Pens...show And Tell.


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137 replies to this topic

#41 jar

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 18:27

Yard-o-Led pens, Jar?

Yes, in that picture a Viceroy Grand Victorian and a Viceroy Pocket Victorian.

 

But I expected comments about Winston Smith more than the pens.


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#42 ian1964

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 23:32

Here is my small collection :)

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#43 MalcolmH

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 05:30

Here is my small collection :)

 

Very nice.  :thumbup:

 

Why don't you tell us something about them.



#44 ian1964

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 08:08

 

Very nice.  :thumbup:

 

Why don't you tell us something about them.

 

I wish I had a great story but no. From left to right...A Swan, Wyvern, Conway Stewart, Osmiroid another Conway and an  Onoto. I just thought each one had character from a different time and more importantly I thought they are pretty



#45 northlodge

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 16:18

 

I wish I had a great story but no. From left to right...A Swan, Wyvern, Conway Stewart, Osmiroid another Conway and an  Onoto. I just thought each one had character from a different time and more importantly I thought they are pretty

 

The CS85L looks very nice, a hard to find design, the De La Rue has an interesting colour (and might benefit from a close up), and it would be interesting to know the Wyvern model number.

 

You really only need a Summit, Burnham, and Mentmore to have a 'set' of the main English manufacturers.



#46 Aysedasi

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 16:31

This is my Croxley - a beautiful colour and good condition.  Currently available in Classifieds.  

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Edited by Aysedasi, 03 October 2016 - 16:34.


#47 Cob

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 02:57

Following my extravagant purchase of the excellent Onoto book at Sunday's pen show in London, I thought I'd put up a snap of my one remaining Onoto.  I had a few, but somehow have sold them all (though I did buy an old wreck yesterday!).  Three of them went to one chap in Brazil.

 

I have some spare parts so hope to be able to sort out the wreck when it arrives.

 

I don't think I'll be selling this one for a while though!

 

fpn_1462782546__silver.jpg

 

Rgds

 

Cob


Edited by Cob, 04 October 2016 - 03:00.

fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


#48 ian1964

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 06:54

 

The CS85L looks very nice, a hard to find design, the De La Rue has an interesting colour (and might benefit from a close up), and it would be interesting to know the Wyvern model number.

 

You really only need a Summit, Burnham, and Mentmore to have a 'set' of the main English manufacturers.

 

I far as I know the Wyvern is described as a Model 404.  The De La Rue is a Junior a in super condition which came as  one of a bundle of pens I bought and so was a lucky find.


Edited by ian1964, 04 October 2016 - 07:03.


#49 northlodge

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 18:49

Following my extravagant purchase of the excellent Onoto book at Sunday's pen show in London, I thought I'd put up a snap of my one remaining Onoto.

 

 

 

Rgds

 

Cob

 

Paul, was that you I saw busking at Waterloo Station trying to fund the journey home :lol: 

 

I also picked my copy up that day, pricey but a superb product. I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in English pens. I also noted that Steve has re-printed his book on the English Pen Manufacturers (not a glossy / professional product, but the most comprehensive record available by some distance)  



#50 PaulS

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 13:09

I was in Bloomsbury last Sunday and would have bought the book but for the fact that I've maxed out on shekels over the past few weeks and bought all three of the Shepherd books on Parker pens - so the Onoto tome will have to wait, unfortunately.
 
attached are a couple of pix with what hopefully are pens with some interest  -  they're not mega valuable but in reasonable condition............
First picture shows, from left to right..........   THE PELLETINK PEN from TDLR  -  first introduced in 1940 and was presumably designed for those on active service.    The barrel has two compartments (in addition to the section) - one of which was designed to hold water and the other to contain pellets of dried ink  -  thus avoiding the need to carry an ink supply.    Locating paper might have been a problem though.
Don't know if this TDLR model is unique, or whether there were similarly designed pens from different makers with the same idea in mind.
 
Then there are three examples of the Visi-Ink design from Platignum - these things mostly seem to come in lurid colours - but they're cheerful enough even if those steel nibs aren't the easiest of things to write with.     Unfortunately, the plastics used do shrink somewhat making for a sometimes precarious dis-assembling.             I've yet to find a Mentmore example of the same design.
 
Next is a Dinkie from CS  -  possibly the very earliest of the 540 designs in BCHR and clipless to boot - possibly c. 1921 - and it's in good nick fortunately  -  given to me by an acquaintance I see occasionally at local boot sales.
 
Lastly in the firs picture is a Miles Martine Co. example of Laszlo Biro's ball pen invention - I think in 1945 (but could be wrong)..........   I found three in the space of about twelve moths, so assume they must still be fairly common............    they originally retailed at 55/- shillings (Sterling £2.15.0d. - which must have been an arm and a leg immediately post WW II.
 
Some help please on the second picture............    these are two Parker Lady pens which I think are from the P61 range, but not sure - can someone confirm please.


#51 PaulS

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 18:25

quote ............  "Don't know if this TDLR model is unique, or whether there were similarly designed pens from different makers with the same idea in mind."  .............   it seems the answer is there was at least one other pen designed for a similar purpose.
 
In the Shepherd and Zazove Duofold book, there is a full page article describing a Parker innovation which became known as the Trench Pen - apparently based on their Jack Knife safety pen.
The Trench Pen appears to have been devised some time during the 1914 - 1918 conflict in Europe, and carried ink tablets in the lower part of the barrel, which were accessed by removing the blind cap.                Not completely identical to the TDLR Pelletink Pen, which had the additional advantage of its own water supply, but intended obviously to provide the same general purpose.
I've not seen an example of the Parker version - perhaps they're now rare in view of their age. 


#52 PaulS

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 14:11

continuing the theme of cheap pens (although I do have others with a greater value), thought it might be of interest to show some more Platignums.

 

the attached picture shows three examples of the factory's 'Petite' model - which doubtless were produced a myriad of colours etc., but thought these three showed possibly some idea of the evolution of shape.             Left to right is the oldest - possibly mid '30s/mid '40s  -  then perhaps more late '40s/early '50s  -  and finally a shape that might have been more '60s/early '70s ...........   not a very accurate attempt at dating since I don't have books to back up these suggestions, but hopefully not too far out.                  The filling systems also reflect the change that might be expected to correspond with these periods. 

 

Lengths, left to right, are................  91 mm (button fill)               109 mm (lever fill)              109 mm (aerometric U-shaped steel filler)

 

Quality of nibs does improve with later pens  -  some early Platignum steel nibs are nigh on impossible to write with, but it's the short overall length, generally, that makes them unsuitable for manly writing     -   and I don't carry a handbag anyway:)



#53 Azuniga

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 17:08

A Swan Safety propelling Pen with a Mabie Todd New York # 3 nib

 

fpn_1476377969__1.jpg

 

A couple of Blackbird: Blue Bronze  BB2/46 and Red Gray  BB2/39

 

fpn_1476378005__bb1.jpg

 

A Neptune 44A in pristine condition

 

fpn_1476378034__nep1.jpg

 

fpn_1476378068__nep8.jpg

 

A Wyvern 5 short set (FP missing clip) in their box

 

fpn_1476378111__wyv1.jpg



#54 northlodge

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 19:13

Are you sure this pen is missing its clip?

 

I have seen Ingersoll 10 and 20 models based on these Wyverns that had a good 'washer' rather than a clip.



#55 Azuniga

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 20:38

Are you sure this pen is missing its clip?

 

I have seen Ingersoll 10 and 20 models based on these Wyverns that had a good 'washer' rather than a clip.

 

No, I am not sure at all since I have many other similar English pens without a clip, but the best way to know more was to include "missing clip" for someone making an observation like yours for which i thank you...

Best



#56 Baroz

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 14:33

A Swan Safety propelling Pen with a Mabie Todd New York # 3 nib

 

fpn_1476377969__1.jpg

 

A couple of Blackbird: Blue Bronze  BB2/46 and Red Gray  BB2/39

 

fpn_1476378005__bb1.jpg

 

A Neptune 44A in pristine condition

 

fpn_1476378034__nep1.jpg

 

fpn_1476378068__nep8.jpg

 

A Wyvern 5 short set (FP missing clip) in their box

 

fpn_1476378111__wyv1.jpg

Love the Swan and the Wyvern. Great colours. Where did you find them!



#57 Azuniga

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 14:45

Baroz,

 

The Swan I bought it at the London WES show some years ago (I have been there every year except this last one that I could not) and the Wyvern set I got in in Washington through another PCA member...

 

A lot of English pens in my collection so I will keep posting whenever there is time...



#58 Baroz

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 15:12

You have a wonderful collection. And impeccable taste. Thanks for sharing with us.


Edited by Baroz, 18 October 2016 - 15:13.


#59 PaulS

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 15:50

hoping someone can help please with what I assume is a Newhaven nib imprint code.        I've looked through the Parker books and found the codes for Janesville pens, so may have missed information for pens made this side of the pond.

Couple of early b.f. (1941 - 42 I think) Victories in lined rose silver and burgundy, which looks to have been a Valentine colour some time in the late 1930s, then used on the very early Victories after Parker had taken them over in 1941  -  the Victory was apparently the only Parker model made solely at Newhaven.                  I'm unsure why Parker chose to produce this model without a cap band - possibly one of the consequences of war time restrictions on materials.              Sorry the pix lack some aesthetic war-time background related ephemera  -  does anyone know - was this model named as a direct result of the Battle of Britain air conflict??

 

It's the nib imprint showing the figures 20 and 9 that I'm clueless on, so hoping someone can explain - and thanks for looking.       Paul.



#60 northlodge

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 20:12

hoping someone can help please with what I assume is a Newhaven nib imprint code.        I've looked through the Parker books and found the codes for Janesville pens, so may have missed information for pens made this side of the pond.

Couple of early b.f. (1941 - 42 I think) Victories in lined rose silver and burgundy, which looks to have been a Valentine colour some time in the late 1930s, then used on the very early Victories after Parker had taken them over in 1941  -  the Victory was apparently the only Parker model made solely at Newhaven.                  I'm unsure why Parker chose to produce this model without a cap band - possibly one of the consequences of war time restrictions on materials.              Sorry the pix lack some aesthetic war-time background related ephemera  -  does anyone know - was this model named as a direct result of the Battle of Britain air conflict??

 

It's the nib imprint showing the figures 20 and 9 that I'm clueless on, so hoping someone can explain - and thanks for looking.       Paul.

I do not believe the pen was named after the BOB,also  it is claimed that some early Victories came from Canada, although I have also heard the claim it was the first uniquely Newhaven model.

 

The nib is incorrect for the pen. I think it is a size 20 from the UK duofold range, dated for 1959.








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