Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Medium Montblanc Nibs

montblanc medium nib

  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#1 kenny

kenny

    All Hail Caffeine!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 811 posts

Posted 19 April 2016 - 01:46

Once again, I have so send my MB purchases to Germany for new nibs. They came standard with Medium nibs, but I need a fine nib.

 

I just don't understand how Medium can be the most popular MB nibs.  These nibs write broader than typical Japanese nibs. 

I assume the Medium gets better shading, but whenever I try writing with them, all my "e"s and "o"s get filled in.  It's much harder to read my writing.

When using standard ruled paper, I don't understand why others wouldn't have this problem as well.

 

So, MB Medium Nib lovers, what's your secret?  Do you just write very large?  Do you not care if your letters get filled in?  Do you have "wider" letters as part of your penmanship?  Do you just use them for signatures?

 

I just can't figure it. 


Edited by kenny, 19 April 2016 - 01:46.


Sponsored Content

#2 T4TEXAS

T4TEXAS

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 634 posts
  • Location:Deep In The Heart of Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 02:35

I am going to have a medium stubbed, which may help with the letters closing. Anyone find this to be true?

"You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club."

- Jack London

 

SnailBadge.png

 

 

 


#3 FOUR X FOUR

FOUR X FOUR

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,373 posts
  • Location:Florida
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 02:42

.

#4 FOUR X FOUR

FOUR X FOUR

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,373 posts
  • Location:Florida
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 02:45

Once again, I have so send my MB purchases to Germany for new nibs. They came standard with Medium nibs, but I need a fine nib.
 
I just don't understand how Medium can be the most popular MB nibs.  These nibs write broader than typical Japanese nibs. 
I assume the Medium gets better shading, but whenever I try writing with them, all my "e"s and "o"s get filled in.  It's much harder to read my writing.
When using standard ruled paper, I don't understand why others wouldn't have this problem as well.
 
So, MB Medium Nib lovers, what's your secret?  Do you just write very large?  Do you not care if your letters get filled in?  Do you have "wider" letters as part of your penmanship?  Do you just use them for signatures?
 
I just can't figure it.

No secret here. I feel your pain. I had to send my mediums back, as well. 😃😃

Oh no, they killed Kenny! Please forgive me, I just couldn't help myself I would add the next line but if the Mod doesn't understand, I could get in trouble. Snicker, snicker.

#5 niksch

niksch

    Donor Pen

  • Premium - Emerald

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,897 posts
  • Location:Colorado Springs
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 03:03

I think the disconnect is that you want an Asian sized nib from a European manufacturer. It's no secret that MB nibs are wider than Asian styles...it's been discussed here, albeit some long time ago. Order a size down.

Or use a dry-er ink.
Hard times don't last, but hard people do.

Thank a Veteran.



#6 kenny

kenny

    All Hail Caffeine!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 811 posts

Posted 19 April 2016 - 04:13

I think the disconnect is that you want an Asian sized nib from a European manufacturer. It's no secret that MB nibs are wider than Asian styles...it's been discussed here, albeit some long time ago. Order a size down.

Or use a dry-er ink.

 

 

No, it's not a disconnect.  I know I want a fine nib from MB, and I realize that an MB medium is bigger than an Asian medium nib.  I have dozens of MB, and have switched almost all of them for fine nibs when I bought them.  I understand this perfectly.  The terms "medium" or "fine" are therefore irrelevant, I just want one "x.xx mm wide", which would correlate to a MB fine, or Sailor medium, or whatever.

 

What I find surprising is that the majority of MB buyers apparently prefer the Medium nibs (i.e., "x.xx millimeter wide nib that MB calls a Medium"). I just don't understand what's different about other peoples' writing that they can write well with a nib of that size, regardless of what you call it, and I cannot. Hence my questions:  "are they writing larger?"  "are they only using it for signature?", "How can they fit it on standard ruled paper and still be legible?", etc.


Edited by kenny, 19 April 2016 - 04:16.


#7 mjchuang9

mjchuang9

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 452 posts
  • Location:Taiwan
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 04:59

Using a fountain pen is not only for legibility but also mood. Different nibs of width bring different strokes (moods). I preferred F first and then B,BB and now returns to M. M is practical to me yet not as boring as F.  



#8 Matlock

Matlock

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,631 posts
  • Location:Essex
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 05:22

Horses for courses. We are all different (thank goodness). I, too, like fine nibs. I have a monotone F (probably more XF) nib on my 146 and it is wonderful. I also have M and B nibs which I use from time to time.


Peter


#9 jar

jar

    A Vintage Pen has to be older than me.

  • Premium - Ruby

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 26,101 posts
  • Location:From Deep South Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 12:53

I do not understand why anyone would want a Japanese fine or even most of their mediums;  Japanese medium, "B" and even "C" nibs for me.


My Sister's website :  Rose Hill Studios

My Website


#10 lemonde

lemonde

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 76 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 13:20

I send most of medium Montblancs out to Germany as well...but to exchange for broad nibs. So, no help from me, I'm afraid :)

 

Here's a pic of the one medium nib that I have not sent out, because I like the way it writes as is, the Blue Hour LeGrand:

 

bh3.jpg

 

 



#11 BillZ

BillZ

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,264 posts
  • Location:Victoria, Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 13:45

I bought a 90th Anniversary Classique from Dromgoole's in Houston. It had the F nib. I had the "Nib Doctor" grind and polish it even finer. One of the advantages of purchase from a B&M store. I am partial to Japanese F and even XF nad EF nibs if they are smooth writers.
I have talked to owners of the Model 149 and a lot of them in a professional setting use it strictly as a signature pen and may get it in a B or even BB nib if they sign documents with a large hand.
Pat Barnes a.k.a. billz

#12 Reed_thoughts

Reed_thoughts

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,049 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 13:47

Most of my pens run on the broader side of the medium....

 

Also, by writing with the arm and not my wrist my wording has become larger, helping with the E, L, and so on (all loop letters).

 

prior to fountain pens i'd use a 0.38mm pilot G2... so a medium was then BROAD.

 

Also, i just had a medium nib converted to a medium stub by Dan Smith (awesome work, btw) and imo the nib feels a little broader because the ball tip can be used to write finer



#13 LuckyKate

LuckyKate

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 543 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 14:09

I still don't understand how most people write so small and fine--it seems unnatural to me.  I only have two medium nibs (a pilot which feels tiny and a Mozart which I like for my planner). All my other pens I use for serious writing are either B BB or larger. I love the Montblanc B nib!



#14 ASL

ASL

    ASL

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 365 posts
  • Location:Egypt
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 15:27

Hi Kenny,

This is a very interesting topic  as I had the same question in mind but the other way round !!  I've been always wondering why do people buy Montblanc Fine Nibs !!!!   :lticaptd:

I can tell that I have never used a fine nib, fountain or/and roller since ages, I am always after Medium or Broad Nibs... I found them smooth, wet & there only I feel " MY Fountain" pen.

Concerning "e" & "o" writing issues, even with a Montblanc Broad nib, I don't get a problem with my "e" or "o" filled with ink ! I trust this has to do with speed of writing, size of letters and Paper Quality as well.

See my writing sample by a MB FB 145 Broad Oblique Nib.

Sorry for the quality, photos made by mobile. 

It's amazing how we are different  :))))))

Attached Images

  • MB2.jpg
  • MB3.jpg

Edited by ASL, 19 April 2016 - 22:10.

Cheers - Amr S Laithy
Email: amrslaithy@gmail.com
Cairo Egypt


#15 zaddick

zaddick

    BROADside Ambassador

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,773 posts
  • Location:SF Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 15:40

I think out of the box most people like a medium pen. You get a smoother experience due to greater ink flow. You get a bolder line than you would with a typical ball point pen. I think for the average, non enthusiast this has been determined to be the equivalent of one size fits all.

I used to like F when I first started with fountain pens. Now I like 1.1MM or above stubs. They are smooth, put down a lot of colorful ink and make my cursive look better than it should. I mostly write notes and drafts so I have no issue with the size of my writing. If I was filling out a form and vintage manifold F would be my choice.

If you want less blah, blah, blah and more pictures, follow me on Instagram!


#16 Lam1

Lam1

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,411 posts
  • Location:Minnesota, U.S.
  • Flag:

Posted 19 April 2016 - 16:17

I actually started in FP with Japanese EF and F, but slowly migrated towards medium and broad nibs. Currently, I am in the market for a 149 with a M nib and have a 146 with a B. I prefer the B, but think that M is a good compromise allowing me to do math and at the same time enjoy the properties of the inks.



#17 s_t_e_v_e

s_t_e_v_e

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 615 posts
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI
  • Flag:

Posted 20 April 2016 - 01:16

Penmanship varies from person to person. Some write small and some big (but probably small enough to be legible and fit within a 7mm ruled line).

 

I'm not sure what the line spacing on "standard ruled paper" is. On Rhodia lined pad it is 7mm. On the dot pad, the dots are 5mm apart. So it's relative. If you could give us a reference point (line spacing and your writing sample). 

 

Personally I use medium and sometimes broad nibs. I like to let my hands 'flow' on the paper while I write, if that makes any sense  :lol: So my handwriting isn't big but big enough to be legible. I have handwritten pen reviews on my blog (link in signature). Take a look if you want to see what I mean.



#18 FOUR X FOUR

FOUR X FOUR

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,373 posts
  • Location:Florida
  • Flag:

Posted 20 April 2016 - 02:15

No, it's not a disconnect.  I know I want a fine nib from MB, and I realize that an MB medium is bigger than an Asian medium nib.  I have dozens of MB, and have switched almost all of them for fine nibs when I bought them.  I understand this perfectly.  The terms "medium" or "fine" are therefore irrelevant, I just want one "x.xx mm wide", which would correlate to a MB fine, or Sailor medium, or whatever.
 
What I find surprising is that the majority of MB buyers apparently prefer the Medium nibs (i.e., "x.xx millimeter wide nib that MB calls a Medium"). I just don't understand what's different about other peoples' writing that they can write well with a nib of that size, regardless of what you call it, and I cannot. Hence my questions:  "are they writing larger?"  "are they only using it for signature?", "How can they fit it on standard ruled paper and still be legible?", etc.

We don't know how large your writing is. So, none of us can answer that. Why does every countries medium have to be the same?

#19 kenny

kenny

    All Hail Caffeine!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 811 posts

Posted 20 April 2016 - 04:43

Penmanship varies from person to person. Some write small and some big (but probably small enough to be legible and fit within a 7mm ruled line).

 

I'm not sure what the line spacing on "standard ruled paper" is. On Rhodia lined pad it is 7mm. On the dot pad, the dots are 5mm apart. So it's relative. If you could give us a reference point (line spacing and your writing sample). 

 

Personally I use medium and sometimes broad nibs. I like to let my hands 'flow' on the paper while I write, if that makes any sense  :lol: So my handwriting isn't big but big enough to be legible. I have handwritten pen reviews on my blog (link in signature). Take a look if you want to see what I mean.

 

 

I understand your point that there are different sized spacings with different papers. 

 

Growing up in the 1960s and into Jr. High/High School in the 1970s, the common ruled paper that you could buy would be "wide ruled" which was typical for grade school spiral notebooks with a spacing of 8.7mm , and "college ruled" with a spacing of 7.1 mm per line.  A large percentage, if not the majority, of ruled paper you will typically buy in the US will be one of these two spacings.  Because they are so common, I used a colloquial "standard spacing" to describe these options, but clearly these definitions are more precise.



#20 kenny

kenny

    All Hail Caffeine!

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 811 posts

Posted 20 April 2016 - 04:52

I think out of the box most people like a medium pen. You get a smoother experience due to greater ink flow. You get a bolder line than you would with a typical ball point pen. I think for the average, non enthusiast this has been determined to be the equivalent of one size fits all.

I used to like F when I first started with fountain pens. Now I like 1.1MM or above stubs. They are smooth, put down a lot of colorful ink and make my cursive look better than it should. I mostly write notes and drafts so I have no issue with the size of my writing. If I was filling out a form and vintage manifold F would be my choice.

 

I think your last sentence encapsulates much of my feeling.

 

I admit that a wider nib gives a more beautiful line.  If all I did with my pens was to write personal notes on unruled stationery, I would probably use very wide nibs for the visual effect, and just write much larger.

 

However, I use my fountain pens as my main daily workhorses.  Therefore, as you alluded to abaove, I use them to fill in forms in which most people use ballpoints.  The spaces in the forms are typically small, as you probably know.  In addition, during my work day, I typically write a lot of notes on a 3" x 5" index card.  Because it is jam-packed with data, my writing will need to be fairly small.  Hence, the fine nibs. 

 

Even when I am writing at home, my penmanship reflects the constraints of my work writing, so I will tend to write smaller.  

 

I therefore have to assume that most of the MB Medium nib fans must write in a larger script than I do.

 

 

Attached is a scan of a 3" x 5" card where I made some notes I would typically do (scan is magnified, so have to imagine it as 3" x 5")

Attached Images

  • Image 008.jpg

Edited by kenny, 20 April 2016 - 05:20.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: montblanc, medium, nib



Sponsored Content




|