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#41 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 09:06

 

 
 
You really had to drink the chalice to the last drop before you could enjoy the excellent results, congratulations!
Excellent revelatory contribution which I certainly will re-read several times to get all aspects.
Your perseverance is truly inspiring, thank you for shearing !
I am already eagerly awaiting your next article on feed design….
Francis

 

Thanks Francis,

 

I am glad you liked it....

 

Yes, it's always at the end.  Otherwise, you won't stop... therefore, the working solution always is at the end.  You have to forgive me, I am an ingeneer and I operate this way.

 

Could I ask you for a favour?  Your comment from above, would you copy it into the comments of my blog?  That would be fantastic.


with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#42 fountainbel

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 21:12

Thanks Francis,

 

I am glad you liked it....

 

Yes, it's always at the end.  Otherwise, you won't stop... therefore, the working solution always is at the end.  You have to forgive me, I am an ingeneer and I operate this way.

 

Could I ask you for a favour?  Your comment from above, would you copy it into the comments of my blog?  That would be fantastic.

Looks I  can't post a comment on your blog, sorry

I need to enlist and even need to specify a website, and I don't have a website.



#43 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 08:53

Looks I  can't post a comment on your blog, sorry

I need to enlist and even need to specify a website, and I don't have a website.

Thanks Francis for pointing this out to me. 

 

I forgot to tick a box in the editing view of this page.  Now it is open "Leave a reply"

 

I am going to check the other pages, too


with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#44 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 09:01

Looks I  can't post a comment on your blog, sorry

I need to enlist and even need to specify a website, and I don't have a website.

It's funny.  I often wondered why people would not leave replies... because I had not ticked the box for it on most pages.  How could that happen?


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Amadeus W.
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#45 milkb0at

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 14:04

That was a wonderful and informative read. The wonders of science and engineering. Reading your site I've learned a lot about feed and nib science, for which I'm grateful.



#46 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 08:39

That was a wonderful and informative read. The wonders of science and engineering. Reading your site I've learned a lot about feed and nib science, for which I'm grateful.

Thank you for your encouraging comment.  Yes, there is wonder and adventure in design and ingeneering, especially at the start of a design.  I wish, the aspect of Art is totally overlooked today during the training of ingeneers.  The creative ingeneer goes through the artistic process at the start of any project... when the idea forms a thought and then an image

 

Later, when one designs for production one tends to minimise the adventures and surprises :o


with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#47 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 13:18

not sure... have I told you that I have almost completed my writing about feeds.  

 

would REALLY appreciate some questions or pointers, so I know what's missing    :rolleyes:


with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#48 FiratYildirim

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 23:18

Thank you very much for sharing such valuable information in your web site. I am not an engineer and my English is not very good, however you explain the design and ingeneering dynamics of a fountain pen in such an intelligible, simple way that reading your site become an intellectual trip for me in a capillarry action world. 

 

I want to ask a question about nib design. Is it possible to design a full flex pen by using composite materials in the nib? For example; fiberglass, carbon fiber, kevlar, NTPT (north  thin ply technology) composites are very flexible (can be flexible in a nib), corrosion resistant materials. 

 

My theory about why manufacturers don't use these materials is; firstly the demand on a full flex pen is not enough to counterbalance the research and development costs. Secondly, composite materials that can be used in the nib secction doesn't have the sufficient hardness, scratch resistance to be used in the tip section.



#49 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 09:32

Thank you very much for sharing such valuable information in your web site. I am not an engineer and my English is not very good, however you explain the design and ingeneering dynamics of a fountain pen in such an intelligible, simple way that reading your site become an intellectual trip for me in a capillarry action world. 

 

I want to ask a question about nib design. Is it possible to design a full flex pen by using composite materials in the nib? For example; fiberglass, carbon fiber, kevlar, NTPT (north  thin ply technology) composites are very flexible (can be flexible in a nib), corrosion resistant materials. 

 

My theory about why manufacturers don't use these materials is; firstly the demand on a full flex pen is not enough to counterbalance the research and development costs. Secondly, composite materials that can be used in the nib secction doesn't have the sufficient hardness, scratch resistance to be used in the tip section.

Thank you for your praise.   :blush: I am of German background... English as a second language...  :rolleyes:

 

And you are so correct, without capillary action there would be no life.  :)

 

A flexible nib out of plastic and composite materials?  What an intelligent question.  Yes, of course, I can say, easily.  Everything, which can be utilized for capillary action can be used as nib material.  It was done so in the past, quills, squashed sticks of bamboo and brushes.  

 

What is your definition of a nib?   :rolleyes:   How far can you stretch your imagination?

 

in the last 40 years, there have been many innovations in this quarter.  The fibre pen or marker uses a piece of felt of all sorts of material.  Some have their fibres all mangled and squashed up, some use the fibres all lined up.  if plastic, the tip would be heat treated to compact it, make it stiffer, thinner and longer lasting.   B)

 

My all favourite is the mono fibre.  It is a drawn plastic fibre using a similar idea like the spider's gland to make the filament for its web.  As far as I know, it was invented and produced by the Japanese firm Pentel.   ;)  

 

 

I would like to invite you to buy some, cut the tip with a sharp knife or blade and clean the small bit in methylated spirit or poly ethylene glycol, if you have.  Put it under a microscope and be ready for a wonderful surprise.  I love using them, the way they write and their forgivingness to handling.

 

the reason for using metal, tipped with a hard-metal ball is the longevity of the tip.  and the shape is purely traditional.  Therefore, even if you want to stay with the traditional shape of a nib, of course, you can make it out of anything, which is flexible, is hydrophilic and can be tipped with some lasting material.   B)

 

Thanks again for your fascinating question.  I have been carrying this idea with me since my time as a pen ingeneer, but never found a companion on this idea.


with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#50 FiratYildirim

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 14:47

Thank you for your praise.   :blush: I am of German background... English as a second language...  :rolleyes:

 

And you are so correct, without capillary action there would be no life.  :)

 

A flexible nib out of plastic and composite materials?  What an intelligent question.  Yes, of course, I can say, easily.  Everything, which can be utilized for capillary action can be used as nib material.  It was done so in the past, quills, squashed sticks of bamboo and brushes.  

 

What is your definition of a nib?   :rolleyes:   How far can you stretch your imagination?

 

in the last 40 years, there have been many innovations in this quarter.  The fibre pen or marker uses a piece of felt of all sorts of material.  Some have their fibres all mangled and squashed up, some use the fibres all lined up.  if plastic, the tip would be heat treated to compact it, make it stiffer, thinner and longer lasting.   B)

 

My all favourite is the mono fibre.  It is a drawn plastic fibre using a similar idea like the spider's gland to make the filament for its web.  As far as I know, it was invented and produced by the Japanese firm Pentel.   ;)  

 

 

I would like to invite you to buy some, cut the tip with a sharp knife or blade and clean the small bit in methylated spirit or poly ethylene glycol, if you have.  Put it under a microscope and be ready for a wonderful surprise.  I love using them, the way they write and their forgivingness to handling.

 

the reason for using metal, tipped with a hard-metal ball is the longevity of the tip.  and the shape is purely traditional.  Therefore, even if you want to stay with the traditional shape of a nib, of course, you can make it out of anything, which is flexible, is hydrophilic and can be tipped with some lasting material.   B)

 

Thanks again for your fascinating question.  I have been carrying this idea with me since my time as a pen ingeneer, but never found a companion on this idea.

This weekend I am going to make a primitive :) nib out of fiberglass. It will be dip a pen. I am planning to use a cotton piece as feed. Let's see how it will perform. I think unidirectional fiberglass will flex better but I will also give multidirectional fiberglass a try. I will share the results and photos here.



#51 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 10:18

This weekend I am going to make a primitive :) nib out of fiberglass. It will be dip a pen. I am planning to use a cotton piece as feed. Let's see how it will perform. I think unidirectional fiberglass will flex better but I will also give multidirectional fiberglass a try. I will share the results and photos here.

Love it, that's the spirit!  I am keen to hear about your results.  

 

Just had a thought... shrink hose would be a good way of holding the fibres and pressing them together.  

 

Did you have a chance to look at a mono fibre?


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Amadeus W.
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#52 Pickwick

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 14:18

Love it, that's the spirit!  I am keen to hear about your results.  

 

Just had a thought... shrink hose would be a good way of holding the fibres and pressing them together.  

 

Did you have a chance to look at a mono fibre?

 

Pentel have had two pens on the market for some time with a similar idea. They are the Pentel Pulaman which looks like a plastic nib, and the Tradio which appears to be a hard fiber. The Tradio is refillable, whereas the Pulaman is disposable. Both of these nibs have no tines as such. Reviews are showing  that both these pens work well.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#53 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 08:08

 

Pentel have had two pens on the market for some time with a similar idea. They are the Pentel Pulaman which looks like a plastic nib, and the Tradio which appears to be a hard fiber. The Tradio is refillable, whereas the Pulaman is disposable. Both of these nibs have no tines as such. Reviews are showing  that both these pens work well.

Yes, they would not have tines in an ordinary way, they have "many, encapsulated".  I have seen and used them.  It is a bundle of some form of plastic fibers Melted, extruded in a plastic sheet which is shaped into a wedge which can bend like a soft nib.  I squashed the fiber section a bit so to make it change width with increasing pressure.  :closedeyes:

 

Some salesman dropped it on my desk in the early 80th with a snuff!  They could not see the benefit.  I think it's great and that Pentel is not scared of producing a really innovative products.   :thumbup:

 

On the not as good side... the feed they put in there is far to long.  When I tested the pen the feed would only fill to about one third and quite irregularly... and once the slits were full they would not empty.  I wonder, perhaps it was only a gimmick. 


Edited by PenIngeneer, 05 November 2016 - 08:12.

with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#54 Pickwick

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 15:05

Yes, they would not have tines in an ordinary way, they have "many, encapsulated".  I have seen and used them.  It is a bundle of some form of plastic fibers Melted, extruded in a plastic sheet which is shaped into a wedge which can bend like a soft nib.  I squashed the fiber section a bit so to make it change width with increasing pressure.  :closedeyes:

 

Some salesman dropped it on my desk in the early 80th with a snuff!  They could not see the benefit.  I think it's great and that Pentel is not scared of producing a really innovative products.   :thumbup:

 

On the not as good side... the feed they put in there is far to long.  When I tested the pen the feed would only fill to about one third and quite irregularly... and once the slits were full they would not empty.  I wonder, perhaps it was only a gimmick. 

 

Reading some of the reviews, I did get a hint that like you there was a thread of a feeling it is a gimmick. I was thinking about buying one out of curiosity. After reading your observations I intend to pass on it.

 

I am beginning to wonder that along with piston engines, and the fountain pen being almost the same age that it had reached the pinnacle of innovation quite a number of years ago!


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#55 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 09:30

 

Reading some of the reviews, I did get a hint that like you there was a thread of a feeling it is a gimmick. I was thinking about buying one out of curiosity. After reading your observations I intend to pass on it.

 

I am beginning to wonder that along with piston engines, and the fountain pen being almost the same age that it had reached the pinnacle of innovation quite a number of years ago!

I think the nib is a move in the right direction...  B)

 

It seems that there is a cheap version, they come in a packet of 3 or 4.  The way I see it is that the more expensive one uses the same nib... and also, they have been around since the late seventies, there must be something good about them.   :rolleyes:

 

Give it a go... and let us know how it was for you  ;)

 

Tschüß


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Amadeus W.
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#56 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 09:32

To all of you a great thanks for your interest in my website Fountain Pen Magic.   :)
 
Today, I had a look at the statistics and discovered that 8,611 people viewed my site and 1,580 alone are from The Fountain Pen Network.  I am thrilled and decided to put my other writing at second priority.   :P
 
There is so much more to write about fountain pens.  Are there any preferences from you?  Any burning questions?  Now is the time to ask them.   :rolleyes:  
 
As always

with kindness...

 

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#57 milkb0at

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 11:53

Well you've done nib, feed and ink. So the one main category remaining is the body. 

 

For me, things of interest include:

- Choosing materials (e.g. plastics that won't crack like TWSBI)

- Cap retention (e.g. designing the "ears" for the Lamy 2000, why Lamy doesn't have screw caps)

- How the design department and engineering work together to choose materials and shapes (the Lamy 2000 must have been lovely to design but a nightmare to engineer)

- Freedom / constraints in reuse of parts (e.g. the nib and feed of most Lamy pens)

- Painting / coating of pens for durability and aesthetics

 

I happen to have chosen Lamy as an example, just as you happened to have chosen to show Lamy feed and nib designs, but of course you can use whatever knowledge you gained from the mysterious German pen manufacturer ;)



#58 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 10:07

Well you've done nib, feed and ink. So the one main category remaining is the body. 

 

For me, things of interest include:

- Choosing materials (e.g. plastics that won't crack like TWSBI)

- Cap retention (e.g. designing the "ears" for the Lamy 2000, why Lamy doesn't have screw caps)

- How the design department and engineering work together to choose materials and shapes (the Lamy 2000 must have been lovely to design but a nightmare to engineer)

- Freedom / constraints in reuse of parts (e.g. the nib and feed of most Lamy pens)

- Painting / coating of pens for durability and aesthetics

 

I happen to have chosen Lamy as an example, just as you happened to have chosen to show Lamy feed and nib designs, but of course you can use whatever knowledge you gained from the mysterious German pen manufacturer ;)

All right, then, the barrel it is.   :)

 

Just to clarify:  ...e.g. plastics that won't crack like TWSBI...  do you mean, the TWSBI does crack or it does not?  In case you have not noticed by now, English is not my first language...  -_- 

 

Have a look at this page, where I collected the components of an fp... perhaps tell me your second preference.

 

I have started writing a larger paper on design innovation and design quality some time ago.  They are published in parts in my blog.  They give you some insight in what is going on between designers, ingeneers, marketing/sales and the boss.   :wallbash: 

 

That's when I first went grey and shortly after bald.  My sometimes cynical expressions originated from utter frustration.   :gaah:   I know, that they had no idea what a gem was created in front of their money focused monocles. 

 

Phiooo!  That really had to come out  :blush: 


with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#59 Pen_Ingeneer

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 03:13

General News!

 

1.)

The French have discovered Fountain Pen Magic.  Yesterday, there were almost 100 French visitors.  Their forum website is almost a copy of the fountain pen geek site, no comment.  My French is very rusty, there were nice compliments, that much I could understand.  I would have liked to respond to some, but subscribing in French... no go!

 

So, if there are any French in this forum / site... do you think you could help me signing in?  Do they have an English translation of their site?

 

Now, the final question is:  Where are the Germans?

 

2.)

Have you noticed, there is a section on design towards the end of my site?  The articles have more of a theoretical, philosophical and spiritual lean... with practical applications, of course.  Yesterday, I published a chapter on Aesthetics in my paper Design Quality.


Edited by PenIngeneer, 12 November 2016 - 03:14.

with kindness...

 

Amadeus W.
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#60 tamiya

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Posted 13 November 2016 - 00:23

[quote name="PenIngeneer" post="3728245" timestamp="1478858871"]
Just to clarify:  ...e.g. plastics that won't crack like TWSBI...  do you mean, the TWSBI does crack or it does not?  In case you have not noticed by now, English is not my first language...  -_- 

TWSBIs have been known to crack in their clear barrels. They are a relatively youthful newcomer brand.

Don't own nor handled any enough to guess why they've proven fragile, but perhaps:-
- they like molding in angular shapes (hex/oct/ridges etc) on the inside, which offers stress points
- parts come out of mold stressed? No stress relief processing or bad mold design
- plastic too stiff, insufficient plasticisers etc?
- or just that they've supplied a spanner for DIY disassembly, hamfisted tightening by Popeye owners?

etc etc :)
 


[quote name="PenIngeneer" post="3727738" timestamp="1478770364"]To all of you a great thanks for your interest in my website Fountain Pen Magic.   :)
 
Today, I had a look at the statistics and discovered that 8,611 people viewed my site and 1,580 alone are from The Fountain Pen Network.  I am thrilled and decided to put my other writing at second priority.   :P
[/quote]

haha that might have been some of my doing :) few mths ago have read every page on your site, across many different devices. Was travelling then so rather than typing in URLs I hopped onto FPN first then clicked off the link in your sig ;)

Great work, keep it up!

If ever you're down Melbourne way do let us know in advance and we might arrange something interesting to suit.





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