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Help Identify This Pilot Pen

pilot cartridge convertor vintage identify unknown

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8 replies to this topic

#1 lyonlover

lyonlover

    Mint

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 00:18

Someone lended me a thin Pilot cartridge/converter pen for today. It's thin (exactly 10mm at the thickest point of the barrel) and short (~123.5 mm long, or 5.15 inches long). I can't find anything like it online, even when I search "pilot fountain pen white" on Google Images. I included some pictures too.

 

I know this isn't the repair section, but for some reason the pen writes very dry and is quite scratchy. I included a picture of the nib where the tines seem to be misaligned. I'm using Noodler's X-Feather with this pen if it matters.

My friend doesn't know what kind of pen it is either. He found it at a rummage sale.

Attached Images

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Edited by lyonlover, 24 March 2016 - 00:23.


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#2 swanjun

swanjun

    (Not really a lamb.)

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 00:48

I can't help you with the type, but I have had some fine-nibbed Pilots write dry at first. What I usually do is pull the nib and feed (you might not be able to with that model) and use a razor blade to deepen the channel on the feed. Then it writes nicely!



#3 lyonlover

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 05:14

Bump



#4 zwack

zwack

    Vintage

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 06:36

You don't need to bump posts, people will get to them when they get to them.

That pen almost looks like a quarto, except the quarto is square.

It looks a bit like the cavalier, but again, not quite right.

Another similar pilot is the pilot tow.

But I really don't know.

#5 beboy

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 17:15

It looks like an obscure model from the 1970s or the 1980s, inspired by the Montblanc Noblesse I guess. 



#6 lyonlover

lyonlover

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:33

Yeah at first I thought it was some 70s pen, sort of like a Sheaffer Targa. It's still super scratchy, even after some priming on fine grit whetstone, and I can't pull the nib out of the feed.

 

I know how annoying it is when people bump, so I don't think I'll do it again



#7 zwack

zwack

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:51

Most nibs and feeds are friction fit. You might be able to push them out with a rod. If they are that tricky though you might have trouble putting them back in too.

Good luck. Sorry I can't help identify the exact model.

#8 hari317

hari317

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 08:33

My friend doesn't know what kind of pen it is either. He found it at a rummage sale.


The logo on the nib indicates Korea manufacture. here is a seller on ebay who sells a lot of Korean Pilots, many of them have sections identical to the one on your pen:

http://www.ebay.com/...gbr=1&_zpclkd=1

the dry nib can simply result from dried ink.
In case you wish to write to me, pls use ONLY email by clicking here. I do not check PMs. Thank you.

#9 lyonlover

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 00:30

So what I'm getting is that this is

-a pen from the 70s/80s, and this clicks in with the straight, blunt tube designs of the period (Sheaffer Targa, Montblanc Noblesse).

-Korean, judging from hari317's input about the "p" symbol on the nib.

-an obscure pen (can't find any photos online), but then, it might have been popular in Korea, as Korean Pilot pens were not sold in Japan.

-a budget pen (it's a sturdy, everyday-carry pen that I would put in my front pant pockets, but corners are cut here and there)

-probably nameless, but that's just a hunch.

 

I'll say this is a closed case.

 

Thanks you guys for all of your contributions!







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pilot, cartridge, convertor, vintage, identify, unknown



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