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Help And Advice Regarding Celluloid

celluloid

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7 replies to this topic

#1 Aurko

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 03:52

I have recently acquired a Wahl Doric Airliner 2nd Generation in the green shell finish from the Long Island pen show. I paid a lot of money for it [given my college student budget] and I want to take good care of it. I have heard that the Dorics have a tendency to have the celluloid degrade, and I'm concerned. Is there anything I can do to prevent it from degrading? I plan on using it [gently, mostly at home] and does anyone have any experience with the Green shell celluloid? If so, have yours degraded/cracked over time? I know that some colors are more stable than others. I love how it writes and I've wanted a Doric for a long time now [I think they're some of the prettiest pens out there]

 

Here is a picture of the pen: 

 

25743129535_e59013739d_b.jpg12380755_10205823827818410_1369006174_o by Dhrupad Mamun, on Flickr

 

 



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#2 Polanova

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 13:17

If the pen hasn`t shown any sign of celluloid disease (for the past 80 years) I wouldn`t worry. If your pen doesn`t show a color change towards neon green on the pen`s ends, you`re safe.

 

Don`t let in lying in the bright sun too much & by all means don`t keep it together with any celluloid pen(s) which do show those tell tale signs, as the disease is contagious!

 

Above all, use your pen  :)


Edited by Polanova, 13 March 2016 - 13:19.


#3 Randal6393

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 15:02

Count yourself lucky for making such a good buy! An absolutely lovely example of the penmaker's art. Write with it a lot and enjoy it.

 

Best of luck,


Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


#4 Aurko

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 19:10

Nope, no signs of celluloid disease at ALL. I'm very pleased with it and I consider it worth the 225 that I paid. Thanks for letting me know! 



#5 ehemem

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 22:16

Keep it away from heat sources, esp. open flame. Do not store it in an air-tight container.



#6 Drone

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:33

Celluloid softens at around 160F (71C), but the actual temperature varies widely with the material formulation so err on the safe side. Celluloid will discolor at higher temperatures. Celluloid is flammable. Do not soak celluloid in water. When wet, celluloid will smell more of camphor, and the water will accelerate the leaching of nitrates which acceoerates deterioration. Water based inks will stain a celluloid pen if left in direct contact over time. Celluloid is prone to photochemical deterioration, keep the material away from strong light, especially sunlight (celluloid is particularly sensitive to ultraviolet light). Celluloid material is notorious for shrinkage due to migration and eventual sublimation of camphor. However if you have a vintage pen that has not shrunk noticeably, then the material has "aged" well and will be less prone to shrinkage in the future. Allow celluloid to "breath" by storing it in contact with open air.

 

There are probably more considerations, but that's all I can contribute for the moment.

 

That's a beautiful Doric - enjoy :)


Edited by Drone, 14 March 2016 - 05:36.


#7 Aurko

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 01:53

Thank you very much! I'll keep all of that in mind. That's what I've always loved about fountainpennetwork! Some of the most knowledgeable and helpful penfolk I could ever hope to find. 



#8 amk

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 09:01

Know your brand, as well. For instance, among the French manufacturers, Edacotos seem tbe most prone to crystallisation, Bayards are very vulnerable to shrinkage and deformation, while Gold Starry seems to have used much better celluloids from the point of view of stability, and some of the prettiest too.

Too many pens, too little time!

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