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Titanium Nibs


31 replies to this topic

#1 Bops

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 00:58

Hi all,

 

I'm looking at buying a fountain pen with a titanium nib. I've heard these nibs are rather soft and give some line variation. Is this true?

Also, I generally use a M Euro nib. If I get the Ti nib in a M, will that be more of a Broad and is Ti worth the extra money compared to steel? Seller is asking for an extra $80 for the Ti nib upgrade.

 

Thanks in advance :)

 

regards

Bops

 



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#2 Uncial

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 01:26

I have one on a Stipula Orient Express which is springy, extremely smooth and a joy to use. It has a little line variation but nothing particularly special. The other is also on a Stipula, a Model T. It's very flexible with massive line variation and very soft. Very close to an old flexy nib but sadly lacks smoothness. It's not scratchy, just has a lot of feedback. I like the look of the nibs. They age and go a sort of light slate grey and it can take on an antique appearance. From what I've read and from my limited experience of them they can be quite variable in terms of how they write.

#3 Bops

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 01:30

Thanks Uncial.

 

Would you recommend getting one?



#4 Jamerelbe

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 01:53

I have a Bock #6 Titanium nib, Fine, in a Kickstarter pen.  It writes fairly wet, and I'd say is a fine-to-medium.

 

Yes, Titanium nibs are springier than stainless steel, but that comes with a caveat: it's easier to permanently spring the nib (apparently), and almost impossible to repair them if you do so.  Also, while Stipula sell some titanium nibs that are designed to be flexible, most are not - so it's safer to assume you can get a bit of spring and line variation than to try and go "full flex" on them.



#5 Bops

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 03:39

Thanks for your input, Jamerelbe. I think I'll get the nib upgrade. Sounds intriguing



#6 Christopher Godfrey

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 19:22

Bops, I have a titanium nib in one of my Omas pens and like it a lot.  However, when I first got it, some folk commented that these nibs are not really flexible, so much as springy, as Jamerelbe points out -- and they are correct.  There certainly is some line variation available; but, if you want real flexibility, you need to go and look at some vintage pens (Pelikan, Waterman, that sort of thing) -- pens from fifty or a hundred years ago can often do wondrous things with those nibs!

 

Do yourself a favour and see if you can try a 1950s Pelikan 400, for example...


Edited by Christopher Godfrey, 25 February 2016 - 19:23.


#7 Tas

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 21:17

I too have a Bock #6 Titanium nib, only mine is EF in a NAmisu Nova Kickstarter pen. It's fabulous!

 

It's behaviour is almost identical to my Visconti Homo Sapiens EF Paladium nib and that pen retails for SIX times the price of the Nova.

 

The nibs are easy to pick up and if you have the right pen (I think Conklins, Monteverdes and Edisons play well but best check) it'll give you a bouncy soft and variable (not flex) line.

The feeds on the Bocks perform well and mine is really wet. Go for it.  :D 



#8 Bops

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 21:28

Thanks Christopher & Tas for your reply.

 

I'm not looking for a flex nib. Just want to be sure that if the nib is soft will it write wider than what's marked on the nib. That is if I get a M, will it be more like a B because it's a soft nib.

 

Having said that, I'm now interested to check out the vintage pens Christopher is talking about :)



#9 Tas

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 21:34

Yes it will.

No way is my EF nib an EF.

It writes like a medium, although it's so smooth upside down that I use it that way too.

 

fpn_novo_review_low_res.jpg



#10 Bops

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 21:41

I just checked out the Namisu website and picked up this quote from them ... "simplicity is the ultimate sophistication".

 

Nice looking pen :D Might go for the Nova in Ti.

 

Thanks Tas!



#11 Tas

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 21:42

If they're still selling them do yourself a favour and buy two !



#12 Bops

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 21:45

It's on back order but I will put in the order now.

 

They have a polished Ti option for the pen. Do you know if it is titanium or just a Ti look?



#13 Bops

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 22:01

Just placed the order :)

 

Thanks Tas.



#14 Jamerelbe

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 22:11

The Ti pen is machined Ti - the comet grey and black anodised options are aluminium.

#15 wimg

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 14:19

Actually, current Stipula Ti-nibs have more flex than the old ones, and also are much finer than the old ones.

 

The old model Ti-nib started at a width of 0.45 mm, and flexed up to about 1.1 mm (which I did make into a 0.15 mm to 1.7 mm if so required, I even demonstrated this to Stipula during a visit to their factory a couple of years ago). The new ones start around 0.25 mm, and easily flex to 1.3 mm, with nothing done to them, although these are a lot less smooth than the older ones. I recently modified one slightly for someone, it now is a 0.2 to 1.4 mm flex nib, smooth too :).

 

If they are scratchy, they can be smoothed, but it is harder to do than with a normal nib, due to their flexiness. You just need more patience and perseverance :).

 

HTH, warm regards, Wim


the Mad Dutchman
laugh a little, love a little, live a lot; laugh a lot, love a lot, live forever


#16 Christopher Godfrey

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 15:23

It appears that the titanium nib is also sold out for now; but doubtless they'll get more in stock.  Good-looking pens, these: what a surprise!  The lines of the pen look rather like what you'd expect from Nakaya, don't they?  (Compare with the Naka-ai model, I think...)



#17 Tas

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 17:37

It appears that the titanium nib is also sold out for now; but doubtless they'll get more in stock.  Good-looking pens, these: what a surprise!  The lines of the pen look rather like what you'd expect from Nakaya, don't they?  (Compare with the Naka-ai model, I think...)

 

I didn't let that slip. I emailed them ages ago:

 

"Hello.

Just wondering if your design team who have created this "unique writing instrument" have seen this pen . . . ?

http://www.nakaya.or...22006&type=body

and weather or not it's just the lack of clip that makes your pen uniquely different ?

Don't get me wrong, as someone who has pledged, I think you guys are offering good value for money but I now have a slightly bitter aftertaste about my order."

 

Their reply was along the lines of Edison, Newton and Scriptorium all have similar designs and that some similarity is inevitable.

 

Having now used the pen, I have humbly emailed them a massive thank you and a link to my review  :blush:

I am an ambassador for their product. It, is, stunning.



#18 TXKat

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 18:27

I have a Levenger Samba with a titanium nib and while not fancy like some of the others, I love the way the pen writes. It is springy and soft to me and I think you will be very happy with your acquisition.


So, what's your point? (Mine is a flexible F.)

#19 Uncial

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 20:00

Thanks Uncial.

 

Would you recommend getting one?

 

I would, if you can cope with the possibility of getting one that isn't very flexy. I like the non flexy one too though.



#20 Bops

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:17

Actually, current Stipula Ti-nibs have more flex than the old ones, and also are much finer than the old ones.

 

The old model Ti-nib started at a width of 0.45 mm, and flexed up to about 1.1 mm (which I did make into a 0.15 mm to 1.7 mm if so required, I even demonstrated this to Stipula during a visit to their factory a couple of years ago). The new ones start around 0.25 mm, and easily flex to 1.3 mm, with nothing done to them, although these are a lot less smooth than the older ones. I recently modified one slightly for someone, it now is a 0.2 to 1.4 mm flex nib, smooth too :).

 

If they are scratchy, they can be smoothed, but it is harder to do than with a normal nib, due to their flexiness. You just need more patience and perseverance :).

 

HTH, warm regards, Wim

Thanks Wim. It helps a lot.

 

Do the nibs that Bock make fit the cheaper pens that take standard #6 nibs like the Jin Hao or TWSBI?





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