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Comparing Inexpensive German Nibs

nibs knox jowo nemosine

7 replies to this topic

#1 Shrimpkin1

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 03:43

I'd appreciate any insights/feedback about cost-effective German replacement nibs...

 

I've purchased about a dozen Jinhao x750 and x450 pens and have enjoyed swapping out the stock medium nibs for fine. I was going to buy some Goulet nibs from Jowo but then found Knox and Nemosine nibs for half the price.  They are also German-made and I have been pleased with how they write.  I've also read about Bock nibs but haven't tried any.

 

Does anyone have experience with these various brands/makers of nibs and how they compare?  Thanks!

 

Najeeb


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#2 Piper 987

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 05:31

I also like fooling around with swapping fine nibs into inexpensive Chinese pens, especially Jinhaos. I have a few JoWo nibs (from Goulet Pens) and both Nemosine and Knox nibs.

 

I really can't say that any one brand is significantly better than another. These are mass produced nibs and I have no idea what in the way of quality control goes into each individual nib, if any. They all worked well enough and because I enjoy polishing nibs, they all got a slight touch-up with micro-mesh and Mylar paper.

 

Most of the stock Jinhao nib were reasonably smooth and some exceptionally so. I just prefer fine or extra-fine nibs.

 

I suspect that there is only so much "smoothness" you can expect from an extra-fine nib. That said, i did purchase a dozen Jinhao No. 6 nibs to start practicing grinding, just to see if I can create a decent extra-fine one dollar nib.


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#3 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 11:41

I was very surprised that those two nibs are actually made in Germany. Thinking them the 'iridium' point Chinese nibs. That is interesting.


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#4 Jamerelbe

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 12:01

I have a couple of #6 Bock nibs, ordered with a Kickstarter pen (the Namisu Nexus), and they're pretty nice writers.  I've got quite a few JoWo nibs, and like them too.  

 

The one thing I'll say in favour of Goulet Pens (#6 JoWo nibs) over other suppliers is that they've made it clear: they double-check every nib they receive from their suppliers individually before selling - a kind of QC double-check [I'm not talking about every nib on every pen, just the "Goulet nibs"].  

 

Like Bo Bo, I'm not sure of the provenance of Knox and Nemosine nibs: a lot of nibs have "Iridium Point Germany" stamped on them, meaning only that the tipping is made in Germany, not necessarily the rest of it!



#5 Randal6393

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 21:30

Since performance is everything in a nib, I have a few examples of each of the mentioned nibs, all in Italic Medium/fine size. Having moved them around to various pen bodies, can say that the JoWo (Goulet) nibs are wet, the Knox, Nemosine, and FPR nibs run a bit drier. All give excellent performance, all have required a bit of polishing/grinding, nib-tweaking, and feed adjustment to get that excellent performance. The choice of a particular nib for a pen, for me, depends on the pen body, the feed, and the ink that I am using. But I am happy with just about any nib that is produced, regardless of source. As long as some quality went into it.

 

More than the manufacturer or pen brand, it's the knowledge that the pen owner brings to the table that makes the main difference.

 

Best of luck,


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Randal

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#6 Shrimpkin1

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 04:36

I have a couple of #6 Bock nibs, ordered with a Kickstarter pen (the Namisu Nexus), and they're pretty nice writers.  I've got quite a few JoWo nibs, and like them too.  

 

The one thing I'll say in favour of Goulet Pens (#6 JoWo nibs) over other suppliers is that they've made it clear: they double-check every nib they receive from their suppliers individually before selling - a kind of QC double-check [I'm not talking about every nib on every pen, just the "Goulet nibs"].  

 

Like Bo Bo, I'm not sure of the provenance of Knox and Nemosine nibs: a lot of nibs have "Iridium Point Germany" stamped on them, meaning only that the tipping is made in Germany, not necessarily the rest of it!

 

I definitely want to try the Goulet nibs, and their commitment to quality is a definite plus.  Brian's genuine excitement about the nibs in his videos is also pretty cool.

 

I checked the Nemosine and Knox nibs again, and also went back to www.xfountainpens.com and they definitely say they're "made in Germany" rather than simply having "iridium point Germany"...


Najeeb


#7 Aysedasi

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Posted 11 November 2018 - 21:19

For me, Knox nibs can't be bettered.  If you want a superb writing oblique nib, try a broad left oblique Knox.  I buy 3-4 at a time and transplant them into most pens I buy that take a #6 nib.  Way better than JoWo or Bock.  I've never found them dry either, in fact they lay down a brilliant expressive wet line.  



#8 Honeybadgers

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Posted 11 November 2018 - 22:27

none of them will be bad writers. Knox probably the weakest towards the fine end of the spectrum but best towards the broadest (they make an oblique double broad that is amazing) And Nemosine probably rules the F and EF nibs.


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