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Favorite Inks For Vintage/expensive Pens?

vintage expensive pen pens fountain pen old pens vintage fountain pen ink inks favorite

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25 replies to this topic

#21 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 15:45

That's reasonable enough. I would love to get Sheaffer Skrip green, but the samples I've seen look so....blue. It's weird. Do you happen to know if it looks green in person? I've heard sometimes cameras capture ink colors incorrectly. An example being Polar Green by Noodler's. The pictures always show it being a faded pale green, yet people say it is actually an emerald-like color.



To me, Skrip 'Green' is almost turquoise. This is not to say I dislike it. To the contrary! For a green with no blue undertones, try J Herbin Lierre Sauvage. Even Waterman Green seems to lean blue.

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#22 Arkanabar

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 19:45

 

Yeah, I have heard that a lot of Noodler's inks stain. Which is a shame, I love their ink. They have so many unique colors with unique properties. But you know, nothing can be super awesome without a catch. There is a wrong to every right.

Everything includes a trade-off, yes.  But what I said was that Amber had removed a blue stain from a demonstrator using a fill of Noodler's Rattler Red Eel.



#23 Buzz_130

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 21:36

Thanks so much for all of the suggestions and tips guys!

 

Oh and how about Akkerman inks?

 

Akkerman inks are not made by Diamine.  When I talked to the great folks from Vanness at the DC Pen Show, they call Akkerman the European Iroshizuku.  I've used Iroshizuku and Akkerman in vintage fountain pens with very good results.  But if I were to play it safe, I'd follow the advice given above and use inks made by the manufacturers who have made fountain pens for decades.

 

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#24 Arkanabar

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 09:30

There was a period in 2012 when J. Herbin was having problems adjusting to mandated changes of their manufacturing process, but as those are now resolved, I would readily recommend their inks for use in old pens.



#25 ink-syringe

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 09:53

In all my years on this little blue marble we call home, i have never had straight up Pilot (not talking about Iroshizuku here, just stock pilot ink) or Waterman inks do anything bad to any pen. Pelikan either but then you are stuck with ugly dry ink (hey! shut up you face man).

 

Pilot for some odd reason does not get the same "it's and old formula from a trusted pen maker that is tried and true" bone fides but I have no idea why as I would not hesitate to put plain old stock pilot blue, black or blue-black in any pen ever.

 

But to be honest, the lion's share of my vintage pens get Waterman Florida Blue or Aurora black in them though for years every pen i owned just got Pilot since in the 1990s that was what I could easily get here. Never once an issue with Pilot.


Looking for a cap for a Sheaffer Touchdown Sentinel Deluxe Fat version

 

#26 fabri00

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 12:51

Akkerman inks are not made by Diamine.  When I talked to the great folks from Vanness at the DC Pen Show, they call Akkerman the European Iroshizuku.  I've used Iroshizuku and Akkerman in vintage fountain pens with very good results.  But if I were to play it safe, I'd follow the advice given above and use inks made by the manufacturers who have made fountain pens for decades.
 
Buzz


Well, here in Europe it is a very common opinion that akkerman inks are diamin re-bottled.
Beside from this common opinion, there is a strict relation among the colors of the 2 brands.
I visit from time to time akkerman shop in Den Hague, and I really have the impression that it is not produced from them in-house. Offen they also are sold out in the shop of some colors, which also mean a certain rigidity in the management of the stock, normally not typical of products produced in-house.

About Pilot iroshizuku, it has not too much to do for me with akkerman assortment of colors. Also smell and behaviour of the Ink is quite different.
it will be also quite complicated for an European company to import an ink from Japan, with all the relevant difficulties given by custom, when they can get supplied from inside EC.





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