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Cleaning My Demonstrator With Alcohol Has The Barrel Turned Cloudy

demonstrator sailor1911 barrel alcohol cloudy stain plastic acrylic

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34 replies to this topic

#21 Brianm-14-FRMS

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 08:38

Mr. Ron Z is cautious and correct.  The WD-40 has given you what seems to be amazing results.  If it were only so!  But in truth, this is merely a transient visual improvement.  It will likely compound the damage to the pen. WD-40 has it's proper uses (although, admittedly, I am not a fan), but given it's composition, it is risky to apply to many or most plastics.  The damage may not be apparent for a while, either.  

 

It is not worth it, unless you are willing to change your mind later about purchasing a replacement part.  Wash it off ASAP with a little detergent in water.


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#22 Ron Z

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 17:06

WD-40 has it's proper uses... (although, admittedly, I am not a fan),

 

They are far fewer than most people think.  There is a very useful and correct sign found in more than one bike shop that says "WD-40 is not a lubricant." 


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#23 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 18:37

Then...what is it? O_O

#24 RudyR

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 18:50

Holy roses. Alcohol, knives and wd 40. Stop doing anymore pen repair experiments on your own and instead ask here before attempting anything else. Personally I would have it sent to Sailor in Japan to get the part replaced. It might cost nothing or it might cost a bit more. Or sell it to someone who can deal with it. But STOP, JUST STOP wrecking a otherwise fine writing instrument.

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#25 mhosea

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 18:53

Then...what is it? O_O


Water-displacing penetrating oil. It's billed as a "multi-use" thing: "Stops Squeaks, Cleans And Protects, Loosens Rusted Parts, Frees Sticky Mechanisms, Drives Out Moisture". Conspicuously missing is "Lubricates", the closest approximation being "Stops Squeaks". Lubrication is not its strong suit because the oil in it is too light for anything that moves very fast or very much. It's designed to penetrate and to coat, not so much to be a general-purpose lubricant. I'm told that it's a particularly bad choice for bicycle chains, hence the sign in the bicycle shop.

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#26 Sailor Kenshin

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 19:39

Water-displacing penetrating oil. It's billed as a "multi-use" thing: "Stops Squeaks, Cleans And Protects, Loosens Rusted Parts, Frees Sticky Mechanisms, Drives Out Moisture". Conspicuously missing is "Lubricates", the closest approximation being "Stops Squeaks". Lubrication is not its strong suit because the oil in it is too light for anything that moves very fast or very much. It's designed to penetrate and to coat, not so much to be a general-purpose lubricant. I'm told that it's a particularly bad choice for bicycle chains, hence the sign in the bicycle shop.


Thanks. We use it on cranky locks, but I hate the smell.

#27 Ron Z

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 14:16

...but I hate the smell.

 

PB Blaster is worse.  :wacko:


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#28 Thewordsman

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 18:14

FWIW.....automotive shops sell a headlamp cleaner that (supposedly......) restores plastic (?) lenses to their original luster ....

You might try this....have only seen ads for it on TV.....can't remember the name of the product, either....!! :huh:

Google "headlamp lens cleaner".....Good Luck!

 

Always try to get the dibs....on fountain pens with EF nibs!!

I would just use toothpaste! I recently took my mother's car in for service to have a faulty headlamp replaced, and after the mechanic installed the used headlamp, he applied a rather thin layer of toothpaste and using an electric drill he proceeded to polish the headlamp. this process took him roughly 20 minutes, as he reapplied toothpaste a few times, however, when he was finished it looked as if it was brand new!

 

I imagine the process would be about the same if you were to use a Dremel, but should you have limited resources, then I am sure it shouldn't take much longer doing it by hand since it is a small area! I would avoid using other chemicals since there could be other adverse reactions to the surface. The only reason I do not use alcohol is because of the warning that was included in my Twsbi Eco demonstrator, or I am very sure I would have attempted using it on a few very stubborn ink flushing situations I have had in the past!

 

Best of luck to you!


Edited by Thewordsman, 09 December 2015 - 18:43.

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#29 mhosea

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 18:58

I imagine the process would be about the same if you were to use a Dremel, but should you have limited resources, then I am sure it shouldn't take much longer doing it by hand since it is a small area!


My 2-speed Dremel is too fast for this kind of work. Maybe use a Dremel polishing wheel on regular sort of electric drill?

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#30 Ron Z

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 19:39

A Dremel is several thousand RPM, enough for the heat built up to melt the plastic.  Better to use a variable speed drill and keep the speed down.  You could use the polishing compound on a long wood handled cotton swab to polish inside the barrel.  Or take a chop stick, slit the end, wrap with just enough soft cloth (wrap so that it tightens on the chop stick as it spins in the barrel) that you have a loose fit in the barrel.  Apply the polishing compound to the cloth and work back and forth in the dull area.

 

I rather doubt that the damage to the finish is too deep.  If you need to, start with 1500 or 2000 grit sand paper in/around the chop stick and wet with water, then the plastic polish.


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#31 Brianm-14-FRMS

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 22:36

Thirty or more years ago, for whatever reasons, WD-40 was a very popular product. Even advertised on TV. But experience has shown it to be a general use product that is not particularly good for anything in particular.

WD-40 finds one regular use in my shop, which is to spray and wash the dirty oil and grit off of tools after I work on the cars, changing oil and tranny fluid. The generic is fine. Or after washing a really grimy tool in detergent and water, to help displace water. But it offers no serious protection against rust (beyond a couple of days or so), and as a lubricant isn't suited for much -not even door hinges. If you have a serious need of a penetrating oil, well, this the NOT one to to chose. Even for cleaning the dirty tools, I will likely just get some plain kerosene to use on a rag when this can of generic WD-40 runs dry.
Brian

#32 snowbear

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 23:28

I would just use toothpaste! I recently took my mother's car in for service to have a faulty headlamp replaced, and after the mechanic installed the used headlamp, he applied a rather thin layer of toothpaste and using an electric drill he proceeded to polish the headlamp. this process took him roughly 20 minutes, as he reapplied toothpaste a few times, however, when he was finished it looked as if it was brand new!

While it should be fine on a pen barrel I would NOT use this method for an automotive headlamp.  The abrasive action will cut through the UV protective coating on the plastic so the degradation will return quicker.

 

Good luck.



#33 Bill Wood

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 03:16

Anything with oil keep it away from pens. If it doesn't mix with water keep it away. Ammonia for cleaning the barrel next time. Sorry about that barrel.

#34 Brianm-14-FRMS

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 08:25

Thanks to whomever eliminated two intemperate posts ( one was mine, mea culpa).  


Brian

#35 Sasha Royale

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 13:56

I have always followed the recommendation of flushing with water (maybe a little soap).  I more is needed, I might resort to a pen flush, made for fountain pens.  Thank you for reinforcing my avoidance of self-medication of my FP's..  


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: demonstrator, sailor1911, barrel, alcohol, cloudy, stain, plastic, acrylic



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