Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Ink Bottles With Reservoirs

ink ink bottle reservoir inkwell

  • Please log in to reply
46 replies to this topic

#21 JonSzanto

JonSzanto

    You do, indeed, only live once.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,411 posts

Posted 30 October 2015 - 00:26

Jon
You mean the current Sheaffer Skrip bottle?

It is a good/bad design.
Good, very hard to tip over.
Bad, very hard to get the last bit of ink out of it.

It could benefit a LOT from one of those inserts.

 

Ah, if you read, carefully, you notice I said vintage Skrip, with the "Skrip-well" bottle. An integrated glass pocket for the ink - tip the bottle, turn it back and a nice supply of ink remains in this area. Still not optimal for the larges of nibs, but many pens will work with it. Here's a photo with the newer bottle next to an open Skrip-well bottle, and you can see ink in the reservoir at the top:

skripbots.jpg


"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

Sponsored Content

#22 inkstainedruth

inkstainedruth

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,747 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:03

 

Ah, if you read, carefully, you notice I said vintage Skrip, with the "Skrip-well" bottle. An integrated glass pocket for the ink - tip the bottle, turn it back and a nice supply of ink remains in this area. Still not optimal for the larges of nibs, but many pens will work with it. Here's a photo with the newer bottle next to an open Skrip-well bottle, and you can see ink in the reservoir at the top:

skripbots.jpg

I have a couple of the Skrip bottles with the reservoirs in them.  One of them still had the box it came in, (the yellow and blue box) and there's a sort of ad on one of the flaps for Sheaffer Snorkels.  So, the bottles may not have been designed for larger nibs.  

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#23 goatgolfer

goatgolfer

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 113 posts
  • Location:Motor City, Michigan
  • Flag:

Posted 30 October 2015 - 02:21

Here's a link to some other previous discussions on innovative bottles.

 

 http://www.fountainp...s-2015-version/


Sometimes I think I can taste the colors of the ink through my eyes. That Emerald.....


#24 JonSzanto

JonSzanto

    You do, indeed, only live once.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,411 posts

Posted 30 October 2015 - 03:10

I have a couple of the Skrip bottles with the reservoirs in them.  One of them still had the box it came in, (the yellow and blue box) and there's a sort of ad on one of the flaps for Sheaffer Snorkels.  So, the bottles may not have been designed for larger nibs.  

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

I've got a query or two out, awaiting answers from people more knowledgeable about Sheaffer history than I. Having said that, I am fairly certain that the Skrip-well bottle came out as early as sometime in the 1930's, and in any event I am confident it preceded the introduction of the Snorkel (as well as remaining in production after the Snorkels were discontinued. So, if it goes back, the larger OS Balances would have still be in the catalog.


"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#25 inkstainedruth

inkstainedruth

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,747 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 30 October 2015 - 05:27

 

I've got a query or two out, awaiting answers from people more knowledgeable about Sheaffer history than I. Having said that, I am fairly certain that the Skrip-well bottle came out as early as sometime in the 1930's, and in any event I am confident it preceded the introduction of the Snorkel (as well as remaining in production after the Snorkels were discontinued. So, if it goes back, the larger OS Balances would have still be in the catalog.

That is entirely possible.  I'm just quoting what that particular box said.  I probably know even less about Sheaffer history than you, so I don't know at what point that particular style bottle (or box) came in.  I was just kinda amused by the advertising, so I'm presuming the yellow boxes are from the 1950s.  I have another bottle that came in a red box that also has the reservoir in it.  I gather from what I've read on other threads that those are more recent (1980s I think someone said) than the yellow boxes (and oddly, it says "Sheaffer" but not "Skrip" on either the box or label). 

Although given the design, I'm wondering if the reservoir was for smaller pens and nibs, and you used the main part of the bottle's mouth for large pens (my mother-in-law recently gave me what may have been her father's pen, which knowledgeable people on here have told me is a Balance Oversize.  It's got a Lifetime nib, but I'm not sure what the size of it is (I'm guessing at least a #6, maybe a #8).

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#26 JonSzanto

JonSzanto

    You do, indeed, only live once.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,411 posts

Posted 30 October 2015 - 05:57

I've heard back from a good source that it was, indeed, mid-30's. It's funny: I purchased a vintage bottle packaged just like yours - with the Snorkel 'ad' on the flaps - and that is what caused me to purchase my first Snorkel! Most of the pens from that era could have used the well, but you're right, the larger pens could just as easily dip into the main part of the bottle. It's a shame that design ever had to go away.


"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#27 Buzz_130

Buzz_130

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,511 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 31 October 2015 - 12:02

My favorite ink reservoir bottles are the Akkerman bottles.  All of my pens work effortlessly with these bottles, and I feel that I'm getting the most out of expensive ink.  I find the Levenger and Sailor reservoirs to be useful, but I find that the nib makes a big difference if I'm going to use the reservoir or pull it out.

 

Buzz



#28 FayeV

FayeV

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 639 posts
  • Location:San Francisco Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 31 October 2015 - 23:01

I like my Akkerman bottles too. However I always worry about accidentally breaking the bottle at the neck whenever I try to unscrew the cap. Has that ever happened to anyone? I only have 4 Akkerman bottles and it will take me forever to use up the ink before I can reuse them for other ink.


Everyone should be respected as an individual, but no one idolized. -- Albert Einstein


#29 lynxcat

lynxcat

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 363 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 01 November 2015 - 15:03

so long as there's no manufacturing defect in the glass --- and assuming you don't tighten the bottle cap down with one of those pneumatic drills used to fasten lug nuts with --- i think those Akkerman bottles will last longer than their caps. glass is pretty tough, even in torsion. now, bending the neck sideways relative to the bottle would be another matter.



#30 JonSzanto

JonSzanto

    You do, indeed, only live once.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,411 posts

Posted 01 November 2015 - 18:12

I like my Akkerman bottles too. However I always worry about accidentally breaking the bottle at the neck whenever I try to unscrew the cap. Has that ever happened to anyone? I only have 4 Akkerman bottles and it will take me forever to use up the ink before I can reuse them for other ink.

 

I know what you are saying: for whatever reason, the rubber/plastic cap liner they use really seems to get bonded to ink on the top of the bottle, and can be really difficult to open - I have the same fears of snapping the neck. I now wipe the top of the bottle and inside the cap to remove ink before I re-cap the bottle. I think it helps, but I wish it wasn't such an issue. Otherwise, I love those bottles.


"When Men differ in Opinion, both Sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Publick; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter."
~ Benjamin Franklin

#31 penrivers

penrivers

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,268 posts

Posted 01 November 2015 - 18:41

Jon
You mean the current Sheaffer Skrip bottle?

It is a good/bad design.
Good, very hard to tip over.
Bad, very hard to get the last bit of ink out of it.

It could benefit a LOT from one of those inserts.

Not to mention in the old ones that if they get rusted it was a hell to open them.



#32 FayeV

FayeV

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 639 posts
  • Location:San Francisco Bay Area
  • Flag:

Posted 01 November 2015 - 19:52

 

I know what you are saying: for whatever reason, the rubber/plastic cap liner they use really seems to get bonded to ink on the top of the bottle, and can be really difficult to open - I have the same fears of snapping the neck. I now wipe the top of the bottle and inside the cap to remove ink before I re-cap the bottle. I think it helps, but I wish it wasn't such an issue. Otherwise, I love those bottles.

 

Good to hear it isn't just me. I know it wasn't due to years of dried up ink on the threads because I've only filled from those Akkerman bottles once or twice (at most three times). I will start doing what you do and make it a point to wipe the bottle afterward.


Everyone should be respected as an individual, but no one idolized. -- Albert Einstein


#33 OCArt

OCArt

    OBB

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,784 posts
  • Location:San Diego
  • Flag:

Posted 03 November 2015 - 00:19

Thanks for the head's up on the sticking Ackerman bottle cap.  I just put some silicone on the top of the glass threads.


----------------

Knowledge is the only wealth that increases when shared.


#34 camd

camd

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Location:Victoria, BC, Canada
  • Flag:

Posted 18 May 2016 - 21:59

Rohrer and Klingner has recervoirs sold separately
http://www.lacouronn...pid-p-6953.html

 

I've bought the newer Ink Misers and they also work great. I found them to be more readily available than the R&K ones.

http://luxurybrandsusa.com/ink-miser/ink-miser-intra-bottle-inkwell/ 



#35 JessLJessup

JessLJessup

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 47 posts
  • Location:NE Indiana
  • Flag:

Posted 18 May 2016 - 22:35

I've just recently got back to FPs after many years of inactivity. I still had this and another in my drawer (black). You can see the date, but there are no interesting ads on the box.

Jess

Attached Images

  • image.jpeg


#36 amberleadavis

amberleadavis

    Inky! En-Abe-Lawyer

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 36,686 posts
  • Location:North Las Vegas
  • Flag:

Posted 19 May 2016 - 01:54

Jess, that's a great bottle.


Fountain pens are my preferred COLOR DELIVERY SYSTEM (in part because crayons melt in Las Vegas).

 

Want to get a special letter / gift from me, then create a Ghostly Avatar  

 

Ink comparisons:  The Great PPS Comparison  366 Inks in 2016

 

Check out inks sorted by color:  Blue Purple Brown  Red Green Dark Green Orange Black  Pinks  Yellows  Blue-Blacks Grey/Gray UVInks Turquoise/Teal MURKY


#37 rafapa

rafapa

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 615 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 19 May 2016 - 05:33

I've bought the newer Ink Misers and they also work great. I found them to be more readily available than the R&K ones.
http://luxurybrandsusa.com/ink-miser/ink-miser-intra-bottle-inkwell/ 

My experience is exactly the opposite. R&K easily availables.
Maybe living in Europe has something to do.;)

#38 Arkanabar

Arkanabar

    Ain't I a stinker?

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,901 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 19 May 2016 - 06:17

Pelikan and Waterman both have tipping bottless, which allow you to have a smaller and deeper resevoir when the ink starts to run low.  Lamy and Iroshizuku have little cones in the bottom to help draw up that last bit of ink (I'd say tipping bottles do a better job, myself -- aside from that 4-7mm of extra depth, the ink column is still the full area of the bottle's cross section.

I can't stand resevoirs, myself.   I find it easier by far to fill a sample vial and fill my pens from that.  I pulled the resevoirs out of the two bottles of Levenger I was given.  I did like the sidewell in the bottle of American Skrip I had.



#39 Fuzzy_Bear

Fuzzy_Bear

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,157 posts

Posted 25 May 2016 - 20:15

My Washable Melon Red Strip bottle mentions Triumph pen with the lifetime point. No idea the year.

Peace and Understanding


#40 Pen90rnAddict

Pen90rnAddict

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Gold Beach Oregon
  • Flag:

Posted 03 June 2020 - 17:11

I was looking for a new ink last night and found myself continuously coming back to Sailor Jentle Black. Now, I am sure that this is a fine ink, but I already have four black inks and to be honest four is about two too many.  The reason that I kept coming back to Sailor was not because it is a particularly amazing black, but rather because the bottle just happened to have an ink reservoir in it.  As much as I would like to try some Sailor inks I have to admit that if they did not have the reservoir in their bottles, then I would not be nearly as interested.

 

Ink reservoirs are great little devices that help to make using bottled ink an easier process.  They make filling pens less messy, they make using all of the ink in a bottle much easier, and they are just plain nifty.  Ink reservoirs are great devices and should absolutely be in more bottles (I'm looking at you, J. Herbin).  The very first ink bottle that I ever purchased (Pen & Ink | Sketch No-Shellac India Black) had an ink reservoir in it, and I have to admit that when I bought another ink I was pretty disappointed that it did not also come with a reservoir.  Since then I have come to understand that ink reservoirs are the exception rather than the rule, and any time I find an ink with a reservoir included I become inexorably drawn to it.  Which is why I found myself staring at a black ink that I would have had no real interest in otherwise.

 

I ended up passing on the Sailor Jentle Black, but I DID buy an empty Sailor Jentle bottle from iSellpens.com (I plan on putting some of my Noodler's Heart of Darkness into it).  I have never been interested in buying empty ink bottles, but it seemed like the lesser of two evils to me, and I now have very little interest in spending money on an ink that I don't really need.

 

So, I am interested to know how many other folks out there have an obsession with ink bottles containing reservoirs.  I can't be the only one.  What are your favorite reservoir containing bottles?  Would you ever consider one ink over another simply because one of them had a reservoir?  To get things rolling here are a list of all of the inks (that I am aware of) which include reservoirs in their bottles:

 

Akkerman

Levenger

Mont Blanc (the long bottles)

Pen & Ink | Sketch

Pilot (70ml bottles)

Platinum (there three standard inks)

Sailor Jentle

Sheaffer Skrip (vintage bottles)

TWSBI (Not an ink, but they do make a reservoir containing ink bottle)

 

 

 

AAINDIAINK.jpg

tumblr_nwwd8n4BK71uf00n4o1_1280.jpg

 

19851.jpg?s=0f16f7d983a13d62105460a6a912

 

PR1420_paLEVINK_s1.jpg

I'm so glad you posted this. I bought a vintage snorkel and found a vintage bottle of Sheaffer Skip peacock blue,

( my favorite highschool memory of fountain pen ink). The reason I searched this topic; I recently assumed I had cleaned my snorkel sufficiently from Waterman lavender purple, and then filled it a month later from the reservoir of the peacock Sheaffer. The pen wrote American blue the first time then purple with a slight torqoise shade. Much to my horror I realized I had spat purple Waterman ink into the reservoir! Thank God it was only the reservoir and not the whole bottle of ink ! I am now in total love with this bottle for saving my rear and am praying the mixed ink won't lock up the pen. I do know a good snorkel pen repair guy if it does,and I think I can find him at the SF pen show this year. Fellow aficionado.    


Edited by Pen90rnAddict, 03 June 2020 - 17:12.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: ink, ink bottle, reservoir, inkwell



Sponsored Content




|