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Flexible-Nib Pens, What Do You Recommend?

flexible nib affordable fountain pens

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36 replies to this topic

#21 pajaro

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 21:39

Yeah, go with the cheap junk pens to try the flex.  That way, if it doesn't work for you, you haven't invested much.


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#22 Pterodactylus

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 21:46

Check this out:
http://www.fountainp...se-my-flex-mod/

If you are patient, willing to mod the nib and tinker around with your pen you can get with the EMF mod a really good (full) flex experience.
You can use the Noodlers flex nib as well as the FPR flex nib.

But both are no real flex nibs in their factory default setup, so you have to improve them to get what you want ;)

There is no satisfying flex solution out of the box available on modern pens.
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#23 EricaTX

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 22:25

It's not cheap, but I enjoy my Pilot 912 with the falcon nib - not the same as a Pilot Falcon.  Much flexier, whereas the Falcon pen is merely a bit flexy/more of a soft nib.



#24 max dog

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 23:14

It's not cheap, but I enjoy my Pilot 912 with the falcon nib - not the same as a Pilot Falcon.  Much flexier, whereas the Falcon pen is merely a bit flexy/more of a soft nib.

Yes the Falcon FA nib on the 912 I believe is the regular Falcon nib with shoulders cut out to enable the tines to spread further.  A regular SF Falcon goes 0.4 to 1.2 mm, whereas the FA nib I believe can go 0.4 to 1.6 or 1.8 mm which approaches full flex territory.  With the pilot nibs, finding the right ink is critical to minimize railroading.  Montblanc Permanent Blue does wonders for my Falcon.  I'm sure there are other inks, but this is what I found works best so far.


Edited by max dog, 18 October 2015 - 23:23.


#25 searcher18

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 23:57

If you are going to try a flex pen, vintage pens are the way to go. The best way to get a deal is to go to a pen show and shop. They will usually let you ink up a pen and you are less likely to be disappointed than if you bought one on Ebay.

The real question is how much flex do you want to start with. I advise getting a mild flex.



#26 benbot517

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 23:57

Keep your eyes open at places that sell antiques. Sometimes there are amazing finds to be made. That's how I got some vintage flex. If I hadn't kept my eyes open I wouldn't have flex to play with. 


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#27 sidthecat

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 03:09

I notice that there's some well-priced Wahl ringtops on eBay right now. They're often very flexible, and if you have small hands one can be a treasure.

#28 searcher18

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 16:11

I have well over 100 flex pens and Wahls are my best.



#29 AlanO

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 17:35

I've just picked up an old Burnham Pen from the 1950s from eBay UK, which has been serviced and has a new sac, for £24 (about $37). I thought the grey marbled casein looked great, but I mostly liked the look of the nib - medium with a stub look to it.

 

It arrived today, and it turns out it's a flex nib too. It's the first flex nib I've had so I don't know where it sits on the flex scale, but it seems to flex a lot and very easily. It needs a very light touch to not spread the tines, but I'm very light with a pen anyway.

 

I've only written a hundred words or so with it so far, but I really like it - and its very unlikely to be my last flex nib!

 

Anyway, this is really just to show there are some nice bargains out there, especially if you go for one of the less well-known makers.

 

Alan



#30 Pterodactylus

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 17:56

22309674005_609680a3dc_o.jpg

 

(Serwex MB flex EMF ..... ESS Registrars Blue-Black)


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#31 rwilsonedn

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 18:53

OP, if I understand correctly your interest is in line-width variation in any direction, and you like shading. And you are a left-handed overwriter, sort-of.

One observation: flexible nibs are not omnidirectional. You can only get reliable wide lines on strokes drawn down toward you, not on up-strokes, and not very much on lateral strokes. So flex nibs aren't going to do what you want.

If you want to try flex anyway, I agree with a previous poster: get some flexible dip-pens and a holder. Not only is this far less expensive than getting a good flex fountain pen, but for very little money you are getting the pens professional calligraphers use--not toy pens or someone's experiment with nib design.

But here is another suggestion: try a brush (or if you wish, a brush pen). From what you say, a brush is what you really want for line control in any stroke direction, and for control over shading. And because you won't be trying to write with your hand on the paper, your hand position shouldn't be an issue.

ron



#32 Pterodactylus

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 19:20

Did you ever tried seriously to write with a brush?
If yes, please post a sample.

I did (with a Pentel Brush pen), I don't consider myself as ham fisted but this really really difficult.
At least I could not master it.
My self experience tells me that this will need a lot of training, much more than with any other pen.

Your advise with a dip nib is good, but this was already mentioned.

What do you have against nib experiments?

Normally words like yours (toy pen, someone's nib experiments) come from people which trades with vintage pens.
IMO a reaction from people which to see their business endangered.

Do you trade with vintage pens?

I have many vintage pens with flexible nibs, some of them are awesome.
But a modified "toy pen", a nib experiment with either FPR or Noodlers Flex nibs can for sure compete with many vintage full flex nib pens with only a fraction of the costs.

Don't get me wrong, I love vintage flex pens, and I will probably not be able to make a wet noodle out of a "toy pen" but these pens allow serious flex writing experience for a lot of people.

Edited by Pterodactylus, 19 October 2015 - 19:22.

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#33 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 19:23

The basic Ahab 'flex' nib requires semi-flex pressure to make it work....and semi-flex is a lot of hard work in "Flex".

The Ahab mod takes it from semi-flex, through maxi-semi-flex to Superflex.

If you are lucky enough to have a true regular flex nib...found in semi-vintage '90-80's nibs or Vintage pre'70....and not the modern semi-nails. If you mash a true regular flex hard, it will spread the tines 3X a light down stroke.

Semi-flex requires half of that.

Maxi-semi-flex; half of that or 1/4th the pressure to mash a true regular flex.

Regular flex, semi-flex &maxi-semi-flex spread their tines Only 3 X...they are not a "Flex" nib! :wallbash:

 

For right now for a beginner....I'll rate the Superflex as so: flex the tines 4-5-6 or even 7 X a light down stroke....you should have an idea or have used some cheap dip pen nibs to see how much the nib spreads with out 'springing'/busting the hell out of it.

 

In I explain Superflex to a lot of 'newbies' I go simple.

Mauricio, is a real expert and is right when he says it's no where as simple as I tell it. So realize my explanation is the simple one.

 

Easy Full flex,is the first stage of Superflex = needs half of the maxi-semi-flex pressure to spread the tines...or 1/8th the pressure needed for a true regular flex. Or twice as light a pressure to flex the nibs nicely than a semi-flex pressure Flex nib like the Ahab.

 

My Ahab Mod gives me that. I have other superflex nibs that are vintage therefore more rare.

The Ahab Mod took my Ahab out of the box and into rotation as a fun pen.

 

Wet noodles and weak kneed wet noodles if defiantly for another day, out side of dip pen nibs. As a beginner you have no reason to be even thinking of that, and this is to telly you can modify an Ahab into a fun 'flex' nib.

 

The bad news is you may have to change the way you hold your pen, and how you write.

 

With superflex dip pens, we right handers have to buy a special slanted nib holder to get what some left handers get naturally.....depending on the way the pen is held and which style is written.

 

You should look up the different styles of left handed writing. Being right handed I got no idea other than my reading...

 

How ever if you decide to grasp your pen differently, change your style, the Ahab Mod will give you a fun nib. Ptreodactylus defiantly knows what he's talking about with the Ahab Mod. :)

 

The Ahab Mod is not a Toy!!!! :angry:

It is a modification one can do at home with a Dremil or round file...that works. :rolleyes:

Sure the modified nib might not last 5 years....I'd not worry about that, Ahab nibs are cheap and it can be re-modified when the nib is eventually sprung. You won't have :blush: the shame feeling from busting an irreplaceable Vintage nib....even the dirt cheap ones are irreplaceable :gaah: :wallbash: .

At least the OP is not springing Vintage nibs.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 19 October 2015 - 19:39.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#34 vorpal

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 20:12

Can you give us a reference for your process?



#35 Pterodactylus

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 20:36

Can you give us a reference for your process?


You can follow the link in post 22 ;)
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#36 AlanO

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 23:00

That Ahab mod looks like a lot of fun - I have a spare nib that came with my Ahab, and I have a Dremel :thumbup:



#37 EricaTX

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 23:55

Yes the Falcon FA nib on the 912 I believe is the regular Falcon nib with shoulders cut out to enable the tines to spread further.  A regular SF Falcon goes 0.4 to 1.2 mm, whereas the FA nib I believe can go 0.4 to 1.6 or 1.8 mm which approaches full flex territory.  With the pilot nibs, finding the right ink is critical to minimize railroading.  Montblanc Permanent Blue does wonders for my Falcon.  I'm sure there are other inks, but this is what I found works best so far.

I agree.  I enjoy Montblanc Tolstoy and Noodler's Midway Blue in mine.







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