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Penmanship And Nib Width

spencerian blackletter cursive

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5 replies to this topic

#1 lgbpinho

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Posted 12 September 2015 - 12:40

Which style of penmanship would you use with an: a) extra-fine or fine nib? b ) medium nib? c) broad nib? d) stub nibs (bellow 1.9)?

 

I took three days, an hour in each, to practice cursive and I was really impressed by how much it improved my handwriting! However, it looks much nicer on finer nibs than on wider nibs. I looks weird on a stub  1.1mm nib. Then I saw some of you using spencerian and it seems to require a flex nib. So, I am wondering, which style would you use for different nib widths?


Edited by lgbpinho, 12 September 2015 - 12:41.


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#2 akustyk

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Posted 12 September 2015 - 13:05

When it comes to handwriting, you can choose whatever works for you! However, the general idea is that you use an italic nib or a stub for italic handwriting. For the American business penmanship (also known as "cursive" or "script"), you need a very fine nib.


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#3 Randal6393

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Posted 12 September 2015 - 21:25

(a) American cursive, (B) American cursive and print-script, © Print, (d) Italic, gothic, roman, or other broad-eged hand.

 

Flexible nibs are best used as dip pens in an elbow oblique holder, restrict to Copperplate, Spenserian, or other swelled hands.

 

But that's my usage, YMMV.

 

Enjoy,


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#4 ac12

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 04:26

Depends on how large/small you write.

 

Example, I can write cursive with a Lamy 1.1 nib.  But I write large on US wide ruled paper (8.7mm line spacing) or blank note cards.  So I have more space to write larger than if I were to use a narrower ruled paper.  I used the 1.1 nib to do my Christmas cards last year, and I think it looked good.  But you have to write large enough to be legible.

 

If when writing, the loop of the lower case e and l are closed, then you need to use a narrower nib or write larger.  That is one of my guides when selecting a pen to use. 

I have a Parker 51 with a M/B nib that writes too broad for me and my handwriting.  I am going to look in my stash for a 51 with a narrower nib to replace it, or slow down the ink flow.


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#5 lgbpinho

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 11:58

(a) American cursive, ( B) American cursive and print-script, © Print, (d) Italic, gothic, roman, or other broad-eged hand.

 

Flexible nibs are best used as dip pens in an elbow oblique holder, restrict to Copperplate, Spenserian, or other swelled hands.

 

But that's my usage, YMMV.

 

Enjoy,

Thanks! One last question: is italic practical for daily use? I mean, how fast can one  write in italic with, say, a 1.1mm stub on average? I did not try italic because I am still re-learning cursive (which feels awesomely fluid and fast).



#6 brunico

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 13:17

I looks weird on a stub  1.1mm nib.

 

It is good that you see this. Many people think an italic nib automatically makes their handwriting look much better. But an italic nib isn't always appropriate, and with some handwriting an italic nib can actually make it look much worse. Italic isn't about getting lots of "line variation" but about the shape and flow of the letters.

 

And yes, italic can be written as fast as anything else.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: spencerian, blackletter, cursive



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