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Would The Pelikan M200 Be Too Small?

pelikan m200 size

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33 replies to this topic

#1 merrycitrine

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 20:37

Hello!

 

I want to bite the bullet and get my first Pelikan! I really like the look of the Congac M200 Demonstrator, and was thinking of getting this, or maybe the new Amethyst! However, my only concern is that a lot of people say these are small pens.

 

Now when I purchased my Pilot Prera, I didn't expect it to be that small! I can write comfortably with it posted, but I wouldn't write with it unposted. I usually have a tendency to reach out for heftier and/or longer pens over it, such as my Platinum 3776 Century, Lamy Safari or even my Pilot Metropolitan.

 

In this picture, the M400 looks really close in size to the Prera, so I have doubts about buying this pen. Any advice/comparisons would be appreciated!

 

(sorry edit: forgot to post the link!)

 

http://www.ciar-rois...allPens-01.jpg

 

Btw, I am a woman, so I don't have very big hands, but I suppose I would like some feedback on how the community considers the "feel" of this pen.

 

Thanks! :D


Edited by merrycitrine, 16 August 2015 - 20:53.


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#2 Bounce792

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 20:51

The M200 and M400 are roughly the same in size.  Maybe some quibbling over a few mm here and there.  The major difference is in the nibs: gold vs. steel.  I do not have a Prera but I do have the Cognac Demonstrator.  It too was my first Pelikan.  It is a very slippery slope after getting that pen.

 

I'm a small Asian guy and the M200/400 is comfortable to write with posted or unposted.  But here are my pictures to help you make a better comparison.  Lamy Safari, Cognac Demo, M400 White Tortoise shell, M201

 

WP_20150816_13_48_06_Pro_zpspc6zpbzr.jpg

 

WP_20150816_13_48_38_Pro_zpsnssw6kpc.jpg


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#3 merrycitrine

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 20:54

The M200 and M400 are roughly the same in size.  Maybe some quibbling over a few mm here and there.  The major difference is in the nibs: gold vs. steel.  I do not have a Prera but I do have the Cognac Demonstrator.  It too was my first Pelikan.  It is a very slippery slope after getting that pen.

 

I'm a small Asian guy and the M200/400 is comfortable to write with posted or unposted.  But here are my pictures to help you make a better comparison.  Lamy Safari, Cognac Demo, M400 White Tortoise shell, M201

 

WP_20150816_13_48_06_Pro_zpspc6zpbzr.jpg

 

WP_20150816_13_48_38_Pro_zpsnssw6kpc.jpg

Wow! Thanks for the quick reply and the pictures :D

This picture looks great. I feel like the pen doesn't look too much smaller than the Lamy? (Or maybe my eyes see it that way?)



#4 merrycitrine

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 20:55

I have heard that Pelikans are smooth wet writers, and this is my personal preference in pens, so it might turn out to be a slippery slope for me too :P



#5 Bounce792

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 21:11

The M200/400 isn't much smaller unposted.  The big difference is the gripping section.  You can see they're much shorter on the Pelikans than the Lamy.

 

Pelikans are certainly smooth writers, though obviously the finer points do give some feedback.  I can't really comment on my M400 as the gold F nib is... way too fat for a Fine.  It's smooth but its going to be a future project when I have more money to get it ground to something else.

 

Wetness is also subjective to ink and paper.  Do you want a writing sample?


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#6 sargetalon

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 21:11

The M200 is similar in size to the Prera but just a wee bit bigger, especially when posted. 

 

Prera: 121mm capped, 135mm posted

M200: 125mm capped, 145mm posted

 

This is my preferred size of pen.  I don't use it unposted though because it is a tad short.  When posted, the M200 takes on a perfect balance and has a great feel in the hand.  It is a bit on the light side but that has never bothered me.  You won't find any heft but if you are OK posting your pens, I don't think you will have much of an issue with its size.  Good luck with your decision.  Perhaps purchase from a retailer that allows returns if the size does not suit you after all.

 

And yes, wet and smooth is how I would describe the nibs.  I would go a nib size smaller than your preferred as they can be a bit wide.  This is usually less of a problem with the stainless steel nibs than the gold


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#7 linearM

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 21:14

I'm a guy with medium sized hands.  I find the M200 to be a bit smaller than I'd like.  I was surprised I just compared my Pelikan M630 with an Esterbrook J and they are almost identical in size and are very comfortable to use.  The Safari is 5 1/2" long capped and 6 1/2 posted, while the Pelikan M 630 and Esterbrook are both 6" posted.  I think it would be worth looking at a Pelikan 600.  If you can find a pen store I would suggest trying the pens out to see how they actually feel in your hand, everyone is different.



#8 Charles Rice

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 21:41

I have huge hands.  MB149, Pelikan M800, M200  -  all fit just fine.  And as a bonus, if you are doing a lot of writing (like a book) changing sizes keeps the hands relaxed. 

 

FYI  -  My MB149 and at least one of my M200s are inked all of the time. 



#9 Lam1

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Posted 16 August 2015 - 22:18

I believe I have large hands. For example, the M1000 and M800 feel very comfortable for me for long writing sections. Despite of that, I feel that the M200s are also very comfortable to use and I never post them - they are wonderful pens, and the Cognac is particularly beautiful. Good luck with your decision.

#10 Ergz

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 01:21

I have an Ivory Prera and a Cognac, and I use them both on a daily basis. Their sizes are very similar when the pens are capped, but they are quite different pens when they are uncapped. The Pelikan is clearly bigger as you can see in the picture attached (sorry for the bad quality). I use them unposted.

 

As for the nibs, Sargetalon is right. My Pelikan EF nib is almost as wide as my Prera M, and all my Pilot F nibs write thinner than the EF in the Cognac.

Attached Images

  • IMG_0248.JPG

Edited by zuhandensein, 17 August 2015 - 01:26.

Pelikan M200 Cognac, EF + J. Herbin Perle Noire

Kaweco Sport Brass F (golden nib!) + Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris


#11 merrycitrine

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 07:35

The M200/400 isn't much smaller unposted.  The big difference is the gripping section.  You can see they're much shorter on the Pelikans than the Lamy.

 

Pelikans are certainly smooth writers, though obviously the finer points do give some feedback.  I can't really comment on my M400 as the gold F nib is... way too fat for a Fine.  It's smooth but its going to be a future project when I have more money to get it ground to something else.

 

Wetness is also subjective to ink and paper.  Do you want a writing sample?

Yes, please! This would be great :)

 

 

I have an Ivory Prera and a Cognac, and I use them both on a daily basis. Their sizes are very similar when the pens are capped, but they are quite different pens when they are uncapped. The Pelikan is clearly bigger as you can see in the picture attached (sorry for the bad quality). I use them unposted.

 

As for the nibs, Sargetalon is right. My Pelikan EF nib is almost as wide as my Prera M, and all my Pilot F nibs write thinner than the EF in the Cognac.

 

This helps a lot! Thank you! I guess it makes sense, because the Pelikan has a screw-on cap so probably fits in deeper than the push-type cap on the Prera. That looks like a comfortable size.

 

Thank you very much for your feedback everyone :)

 

I usually use Japanese mediums and prefer western fines, so I assume if it is too wet, I should go with an extra fine? Does this give too much feedback? (I don't like feedback!) I would also love to hear your opinions on this!


Edited by merrycitrine, 17 August 2015 - 07:37.


#12 Ergz

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Posted 17 August 2015 - 11:11

I attach here a picture of both pens posted and a writing sample.

 

I feel some feedback with my EF Cognac (many of my Pilot F are smoother) but I'd say that my pen is probably not a typical example of a Pelikan EF steel nib —it also writes probably slightly wider than a typical one, but I never had the chance to compare... I actually do have a second Cognac that I bought as a replacement, just in case anything happens, but I have not inked that pen yet.

 

I have to say that I find that feedback pleasant, it was never an issue to me. I usually write on Rhodia R paper, which is quite a smooth paper, but my Cognac works also well on Leuchturm1917 paper. With a wet pen like a Pelikan you are likely to find some issues with some papers that work well with other pens. I find Moleskine paper unusable with my Cognac (generally poor and inconsistent quality today, they were good in the past). But Pelikan wetness is very enjoyable and really is worth the investment in a proper kind of paper.

 

 

Attached Images

  • IMG_0249.JPG
  • IMG_0251.JPG

Pelikan M200 Cognac, EF + J. Herbin Perle Noire

Kaweco Sport Brass F (golden nib!) + Rohrer & Klingner Verdigris


#13 ac12

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 22:14

Just to add a different viewpoint.

I find the M200 barely comfortable.  The issue is the diameter of the barrel.

I find the slightly smaller in diameter M150 more comfortable than the M200.

 

I find the M200 well balanced when posted, whereas I find the Lamy Safari tail-heavy when posted, so I use my Safari unposted.  Balance of the pen is import to me.  A tail-heavy pen makes me have to use more downward pressure to write with, and that become uncomfortable after a while.

 

I found my Pelikan M150/200 nibs not quite as smooth as my Japanese nibs, especiallly as you go to the F and XF nibs.  The Pelikan nib can be smoothened out, but that is extra work/cost to be aware of.

 

The ink line from my Pilot 200 M nib (Waterman ink) and my Pelikan F nib (Pelikan ink) are about the same width.

The Pelikan XF nib is more senstive to paper texture.  It needs a smoother and harder surface to write smoothly, as it will feel the texture of the paper more than the F nib.

 

BTW, the lighter you press the pen, the less feedback you will feel coming up the pen.


Edited by ac12, 18 August 2015 - 22:18.

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#14 teva

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 22:44

Just to chip in, the m200 is very similar to the m400 in term of dimensions.

The main difference visually, is that m400 has more gold or chrome plating and the m200 feels !ore plasticky.

The m400 also has a gold nib whereas the m200 has a steel nib.

For myself, the m200 or m400 are more shirt pocket friendly as they sit rather nicely without the bulge.

#15 Rosser

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Posted 18 August 2015 - 23:13

I like medium to large pens and I find the 200 too small for me.  I bought one for my father as a gift and I was seriously underwhelmed by the size of it.  I can't stand it! :(  Can you get your hands on one to try in a store?  



#16 Sandy1

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Posted 19 August 2015 - 00:46

Hi,

 

I have and love to use both the Prera and the M200. But very different pens...

 

If you prefer pens that have bit of girth, the most significant 'comfort' factor could be the distance from nib tip to a somewhat wide portion of the section.

 

I like the girth of the Prera section - I can grasp the pen very close to the nib end, which also puts the pen at somewhat steep angle to the paper, hence the portion of the tipping closest to the end of the nib is in contact with the paper. That sort of upright 'posture' seems to suit the Japanese nibs more than a lower angle. If I'm doing a bit of jotting / form-filling, I'll use the Prera unposted, otherwise I'll post it.

 

I grasp the M200/M400 higher on the section - almost at the threads - to get the girth that I find most comfortable, and with my soft grip the threads don't bother me in the least. The pen is long enough that even holding it higher on the section I still prefer to use it unposted. The current M200/M400 Pelikan nibs have a great blob of tipping material, not quite a Kugel, so remain very smooooth when the pen is held at a low-ish angle to the paper.

 

Another pen which may interest you is the Sheaffer 330. The inlaid Waverley nib is very nice indeed, the long smooth tapered section allows the pen to be grasped at any point to achieve a match of girth and balance, and is comfy posted or unposted.

 

Bye,

S1

 

__ __

L - R: Prera, Sheaffer 440 (as 330 but with metal cap), Pelikan M400, Platinum President Purist, Parker England Lady Insignia, Waterman Carene, Waterman's 52 1/2 V.

 

c42ebe09.jpg    Note: This is a scan, not a photo, so there is no parallax.


Edited by Sandy1, 19 August 2015 - 00:49.

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#17 merrycitrine

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 04:57

I attach here a picture of both pens posted and a writing sample.

 

I feel some feedback with my EF Cognac (many of my Pilot F are smoother) but I'd say that my pen is probably not a typical example of a Pelikan EF steel nib —it also writes probably slightly wider than a typical one, but I never had the chance to compare... I actually do have a second Cognac that I bought as a replacement, just in case anything happens, but I have not inked that pen yet.

 

I have to say that I find that feedback pleasant, it was never an issue to me. I usually write on Rhodia R paper, which is quite a smooth paper, but my Cognac works also well on Leuchturm1917 paper. With a wet pen like a Pelikan you are likely to find some issues with some papers that work well with other pens. I find Moleskine paper unusable with my Cognac (generally poor and inconsistent quality today, they were good in the past). But Pelikan wetness is very enjoyable and really is worth the investment in a proper kind of paper.

 

 

Thank you very much for the comparisons! I am surprised how thick the extra fine is compared to a Japanese fine. I thought they'd be about the same. And to @ac12

 

I attach here a picture of both pens posted and a writing sample.

 

I feel some feedback with my EF Cognac (many of my Pilot F are smoother) but I'd say that my pen is probably not a typical example of a Pelikan EF steel nib —it also writes probably slightly wider than a typical one, but I never had the chance to compare... I actually do have a second Cognac that I bought as a replacement, just in case anything happens, but I have not inked that pen yet.

 

I have to say that I find that feedback pleasant, it was never an issue to me. I usually write on Rhodia R paper, which is quite a smooth paper, but my Cognac works also well on Leuchturm1917 paper. With a wet pen like a Pelikan you are likely to find some issues with some papers that work well with other pens. I find Moleskine paper unusable with my Cognac (generally poor and inconsistent quality today, they were good in the past). But Pelikan wetness is very enjoyable and really is worth the investment in a proper kind of paper.

 

 

 

as well, I thought Pelikan extra fines would be a lot smoother than Japanese fines given their wetness compared to the Japanese nibs and even how the line looks thicker than the Japanese fine.

 

 

I like medium to large pens and I find the 200 too small for me.  I bought one for my father as a gift and I was seriously underwhelmed by the size of it.  I can't stand it! :(  Can you get your hands on one to try in a store?  

I have a local B&M, I will try  to check if they have any in stock and consider this! I generally avoid it as they tend to be a lot more expensive than purchasing online, and I don't want to try a product in store that I will not be buying from there.
 

 

Hi,

 

I have and love to use both the Prera and the M200. But very different pens...

 

If you prefer pens that have bit of girth, the most significant 'comfort' factor could be the distance from nib tip to a somewhat wide portion of the section.

 

I like the girth of the Prera section - I can grasp the pen very close to the nib end, which also puts the pen at somewhat steep angle to the paper, hence the portion of the tipping closest to the end of the nib is in contact with the paper. That sort of upright 'posture' seems to suit the Japanese nibs more than a lower angle. If I'm doing a bit of jotting / form-filling, I'll use the Prera unposted, otherwise I'll post it.

 

I grasp the M200/M400 higher on the section - almost at the threads - to get the girth that I find most comfortable, and with my soft grip the threads don't bother me in the least. The pen is long enough that even holding it higher on the section I still prefer to use it unposted. The current M200/M400 Pelikan nibs have a great blob of tipping material, not quite a Kugel, so remain very smooooth when the pen is held at a low-ish angle to the paper.

 

Another pen which may interest you is the Sheaffer 330. The inlaid Waverley nib is very nice indeed, the long smooth tapered section allows the pen to be grasped at any point to achieve a match of girth and balance, and is comfy posted or unposted.

 

Bye,

S1

 

__ __

L - R: Prera, Sheaffer 440 (as 330 but with metal cap), Pelikan M400, Platinum President Purist, Parker England Lady Insignia, Waterman Carene, Waterman's 52 1/2 V.

 

c42ebe09.jpg    Note: This is a scan, not a photo, so there is no parallax.

 

Thanks very much for the comparison! I really appreciate the scan. I am surprised you can use a Prera unposted! I hold my pens somewhat in between the two positions you described. Not too close to the nib and not too high up either. The Sheaffer 440 looks really nice! I like the shape and the apparent girth of it :)



#18 Limitlesspens

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 10:22

For me Pelikan 400 (similar in size to m200) was perfect sized pen - very light, perfectly balanced.



#19 Aysedasi

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 21:27

I've owned two or three M200s and moved them all on - far too small for me.  I then got an M400 - still too small.  I now own an M600, which I've kept because of it;'s magnificent OB nib - but it's still too small.  Just got an M1000 and I'm definitely in love again........  :)   Even though I don't have large hands I have fingers that struggle with small diameter pens.  My 149s, the M1000 and a large cigar-shaped custom made Newton are the most comfortable pens I've ever used.  



#20 ac12

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 21:54

 

I've owned two or three M200s and moved them all on - far too small for me.  I then got an M400 - still too small.  I now own an M600, which I've kept because of it;'s magnificent OB nib - but it's still too small.  Just got an M1000 and I'm definitely in love again........   :)   Even though I don't have large hands I have fingers that struggle with small diameter pens.  My 149s, the M1000 and a large cigar-shaped custom made Newton are the most comfortable pens I've ever used.  

 

To the OP, see how different individual are.  @ayesedasi is completely in the opposite direction from me.  I could not stand to write with a FAT pen, and he probably could not stand to write with my slimline pens.  So fit of a pen is to a large degree personal, once you get past the hand and finger size.  Although very interestingly, there is a guy in my Pen Posse who likes the Pelikan M300 (a slimline pen), and he has a BIG hand.  But he also use the large Pelikans.


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