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Sailor Specialty Nibs, In Particular The Concord Vs. The Cross Point

sailor naginata specialty nibs concord cross point

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9 replies to this topic

#1 Susan3141

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 20:25

Hi,

Lately I've been obsessing over the Sailor specialty nibs. But, I owned a Sailor with a Naginata Togi nib and didn't really like it. My current obsession is over the Cross Point. It looks like a really cool and versatile nib, but, dang they're expensive. If I go through nibs.com and get a Realo (seems like a piston fill would be wise since these nibs are super wet) plus a Cross Point I'm looking at over $600. A concord nib is much cheaper, but the video I watched on it made it sound super scratchy.

So, have any of you tried these nibs? What are your thoughts? I realize these are really made for Japanese calligraphy and not for English, but I would also use mine for Hebrew (or that's how I'm trying to justify it!).

Susan

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#2 Dr.Grace

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 02:26

I have a Concord that I use for writing Chinese. Originally, I found that it wrote too broad a line for my writing, so I had it narrowed a bit by Richard Binder. Now it's wonderful. It's perfectly smooth when used upside-down (as intended for brush-like strokes) but it is a bit scratchy when held right-side up (for consistent extra-fine lines). I don't imagine it would be so good for Hebrew. I think you'd want an architect grind for that. You can use the Concord for English, and it gives a unique kind of stroke that tapers down towards the bottom. 

 

I haven't used a Cross point, and others may chime in here, but I'd imagine that the line would be even bolder and wetter. I'd guess such a nib may be good for signs or Christmas cards, but not the most convenient for everyday writing.


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#3 Algester

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 04:09

I have used the cross point and I dont see any practicality of an overly broad nib through out writing...

#4 hari317

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 06:28

I have a cross point nib on a sterling silver 1911, the nib is awesome and unlike anything else.


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#5 Susan3141

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 14:19

I have a cross point nib on a sterling silver 1911, the nib is awesome and unlike anything else.

What makes you like it so much, Hari? Can you give me some specifics?

Thanks,

Susan

Edited by Susan3141, 11 August 2015 - 14:19.

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#6 hari317

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 17:21

What makes you like it so much, Hari? Can you give me some specifics?

Thanks,

Susan

very wide lines on the cross strokes, excellent flow, absolutely no skipping despite such an huge amount of ink lay on the paper. Super fine strokes with the nib inverted. HTH.


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#7 Ghost Plane

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 19:11

Be aware the Realo doesn't hold that much ink. Which is why I don't own many specialty nibs anymore. Glorious nibs, but the pens were small for my taste and only went a couple of pages before needing a refill.

#8 wijko

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 20:11

Hi Susan3141,

 

The Cross Point, is most similar to the Naginata Togi nibs, it gives line variation by changing the angle between pen and paper.

The Cross Music, is similar to the Cross Point, only narrower. This results in line variation between downward strokes and horizontal strokes, in case you hold the pen parallel to the axis of the paper.

The Cross Concord and the Concord are somewhat similar. they have a nice fine line when used in normal fashion, but very broad used upside down. The Cross Concord is better for this type of writing, since is shaped for using it in this fashion.

 

For everyday writing, I recommend the latter two nibs. On Kanji I prefer the Concord.

For plain broad writing without much line variation, use the Cross Point, and for line variation, the Cross Music.

 

My favorite? All of them, in their own way.

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#9 Susan3141

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 21:16

Thanks, everyone. Lots to consider!

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#10 JMTB

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 11:49

The Cross Point provides much greater line variation and is great fun. I find the Naginata Togi a nice nib but I struggle to get any variation from it as demonstrated in the images below.

 

fpn_1489837595__cross_point_and_naginata

 

fpn_1489837714__cross_point.jpg

 

fpn_1489837749__naginata-togi.jpg







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: sailor, naginata, specialty nibs, concord, cross point



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