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My Next Pen—Another Lamy 2000 Or ?

lamy 2000 pen recommendation novice fountain pens modern clean black lamy studio

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45 replies to this topic

#1 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 17:15

I'm a fountain pen novice and looking for a recommendation for my next pen. I currently have a Lamy 2000 and a Lamy Studio (steel nib) both w/ fine nibs and a few cheap pens: Kaweco, Safari, etc. I'm looking to get my next pen and am leaning towards another Lamy 2000 with a medium nib. I tried it at a store a few weeks ago and found the nib to be considerably smoother than the fine one I currently have. I use my Lamy 2000 for pretty much all of my writing, so it would be great to have another ink color option available most of the time too. 

 

I really like the 2000, primarily for the following reasons:

 

1) the design is clean, simple (no crazy engraving on the nib!), and almost all black

2) it holds a lot of ink

3) its nib is the smoothest of the pens I own--much better than the Lamy steel nibs

4) it's easy to hold and write with for long stretches

5) the cap is not unstable when it's on the pen or when it's posted. (I find that the cap on my studio can always be wiggled a little bit, which I don't like. The cap on my Studio also requires occasional tightening with a screwdriver, which I really don't like. It's come loose a couple times while I was traveling and I had to improvise tools to fix it.)

6) It's tough. I've dropped the pen accidentally several times on concrete, without any real issues except some fine scratches on the body. I want a pen I can use everywhere and will most likely drop at some point. 

7) I think it's a good value at ~$125 USD. 

 

My primary issue with most fountain pens is that I find about 99% of them incredibly ugly. Like, I go into a store or a pen show and I just gravitate back towards the Lamy pens--primarily the 2000 and the Studio--because of their clean looks. So, I'm wondering if someone could recommend a pen that I might like or any advice about whether to buy another 2000 or to try something else.

 

I was thinking about the Diplomat Excellence A Plus in black lacquer with chrome accents and 14k nib, but I think its look is still a little too ostentatious for me, and it's probably a bit more than I want to spend. I carry my pens everywhere in my shirt and jeans pockets, and I'm bound to lose one at some point. I was also thinking about a Lamy Dialog 3, which I know I could get for $200 if I'm patient, but, after having tried it, I think it's a little too big for my taste. I also considered a Studio Palladium, but the aforementioned cap issue compels me back towards the 2000. 

 

Maybe a Pelikan M205? Will it be as smooth as the Lamy 2000? And what nib size should I go for?

 

Your thoughts are much appreciated! 


Edited by piblondin, 29 July 2015 - 17:31.


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#2 canibanoglu

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 17:33

I understand where you're coming from but getting another L2K strikes me as a bit pointless. That pen is my favorite design as well and I find it extremely attractive and very comfortable to use but I haven't ever thought about getting another one just because I can't find other pens that please me as much as it does. Preferences change over time, I used to find the Pelikan designs extremely boring and with time the brand became my favorite by far. 

 

The amount of money you want to spend is another factor. My personal opinion is that the L2K can't be beat around the $200 mark. Above that there are some very nice minimalistic designs like Nakaya and Sailor but you would have to spend a lot of money. I find the black Pelikans to be very subdued yet stately pens. Same goes for Montblancs. But if you find these too flashy still, by all means go with another L2K. It truly is an amazing pen. You might want to consider getting the steel version at least. Or you could try to hunt down previous iterations if you are intent on getting the makrolon version. Or you could get the 2000 special edition. 

 

Haven't been much help, have I? :D


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#3 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 17:51

Ha-thanks for the response. The L2000 steel is definitely an option, but I wonder how it'll look after having taken a few knocks. I actually do like the feel and balance of Montblancs, but I don't think I could justify their prices to myself. 



#4 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 18:13

I see something like the Sailor Pro Gear and think, oh, that might work. But then I compare it with the 2000, and it, suddenly, doesn't look so great. For example, see http://edjelley.file...tain-pen-10.jpg

#5 Lord Epic

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 18:14

Apart from point 6 (dropping on concrete) I think you'll find the Pelikan (Pel for short) fits all of your criteria.

 

1) Pels have a classic design, and the steel nibs are not elaborate. There are black M205s around.

2) It's a piston filler so yes it holds lots of ink too.

3) Because you write with the tipping on the nib, steel or gold nib doesn't make a difference in smoothness. The tipping can be adjusted to make it smooth. My Pels (I have 4) are smooth! 

4) Pel might be a little short depending on your hand size, but it posts securely and when posted, it should be a good length. I do all my exams with Pels.

5) Pel has a screw cap (cap won't drop off) and posts securely.

6) It'll survive a drop methinks... but why risk it... they weren't made to last that way...

7) I think Pels can be had for less than USD100.

 

 

I like my F Pel. I think the M is a tad too wide.

 

 

EDIT: I do have a 2000, but I find myself reaching for my Pels all the time. Of course, that's just me and YMMV.

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Lord Epic, 29 July 2015 - 18:19.

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#6 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 18:26

Thanks for the suggestion! I'll try out a Pelikan the next opportunity I have.

 

And, of course, I don't intent to drop my pens, but given how much I use them, it happens. E.g. last week I left my 2000 underneath a notebook on my desk. When I went to grab the notebook it pulled my 2000 with it onto the floor. 



#7 New_Falcon

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 18:55

I would say hold off buying another pen. I've noticed that my choices in nib width have moved from the extra-fine to the broader side of things.

 

The thing with the Lamy 2000 is getting a new nib for it is expensive. So wait and if you see if your nib choices change and then go for it. 

 

For me I agree with you and I really like the Lamy 2000, though I wish I had got a medium or broad rather than the fine I have now.


WTT: My Lamy 2000 Fine nib for your Lamy 2000 Broad nib.


#8 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 19:24

I would say hold off buying another pen. I've noticed that my choices in nib width have moved from the extra-fine to the broader side of things.

 

The thing with the Lamy 2000 is getting a new nib for it is expensive. So wait and if you see if your nib choices change and then go for it. 

 

For me I agree with you and I really like the Lamy 2000, though I wish I had got a medium or broad rather than the fine I have now.

 

Can you give context for the change in nib preference? I think the Lamy fine is equivalent to the line weight I've been using for 15 years. The only reason why I would get a medium is because I found writing with the Lamy 2000 M to be so, so smooth and enjoyable. Most of what I do is note-taking, and broader nibs seem to be less practical for that practice. See below for an example of how I write. 

 

dsc.jpg



#9 AAAndrew

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 19:34

I suspect the nib smoothness was less a factor of the nib size and more the specific nib. There can be differences between individual nibs even of the same pen.

 

If you're looking for smoothness, and you're not getting it from your current EDC (every day carry) pen, then perhaps think about sending it to a nib meister for smoothing. Send them an example of your writing and a quick snapshot of you holding your pen like you write with it (angle and such) and they should be able to make it as smooth as you could possibly desire.

 

It would require that you use your Studio, or one of your cheaper pens for a period of time, but then you'd get your baby back better than ever. And it's cheaper than a new pen.

 

And looking at your writing, I'm thinking you may even want to go for an extra-fine. You write small to begin with, and your miniscules (small letters) tend to get even smaller.



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#10 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 20:13

Thanks, Andrew. One thing about being totally clueless here is that I'm not sure what I can expect from the Lamy 2000 F. It's reasonably smooth, but could it be better? I have no idea. I've definitely used other copies of the pen that were worse than mine, and mine appears to be properly aligned. (I had a nibmeister examine it a while back.) 



#11 Boniface

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 20:28

I have a Lamy 2000 in medium that I use and carry everyday. It is a great pen. Here are some other ones I would suggest:

 

1. Pelikan 205 or 215--I like these pens just as much as the Lamy and use them a lot.

 

2. Franklin-Christoph model 20--I don't have this pen, but really want one. It's minimalistic yet handsome. Also, you could experiment with a stub nib. This and the Pelikans have screw in nibs, so you can purchase different sizes for different uses and save a lot of money compared to having separate pens entirely.

 

3. Parker 51--minimalistic, reliable, and durable.



#12 inotrym

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 20:33

It is my understanding that indeed there are not a lot of pens like the L2000.

 

But if you would be happy with something along the lines of the Studio, I would recommend to take a look at a Parker Urban, a Waterman Expert or a Waterman Hemisphere.

 

Given your taste for a simplistic design, I understand that it might strike you as particularly ugly, but the Faber Castell Emotion is my favorite pen and I will never stop recommending it to everyone! :P

 

Finally, I would recommend choosing a pen that you find easy on your eyes and your hand. The nib is something that can always be worked on and tuned to perfection.



#13 CAG_1787

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 22:10

Both the Lamy and the Pelikan are quintessential German pens, though from opposite ends of the design spectrum. I don't think you could go wrong, but it might be worthwhile trying to branch out a little and determine whether the more traditional design of the Pelikan appeals to you. I personally find the M215 to be w bit more pleasant because of its greater heft and the metal body will be much hardier (if you're truly worried about dropping it).
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#14 Keyless Works

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 22:28

Hmm...other options...you could consider a used Aurora 88 in black with chrome trim.

Another interesting pen you may like is a Rotring 600 with a gold nib...the prices for these pens have ballooned a bit though.

Pilot's Custom Line is very nice and when used with a con-70 converter can hold more ink than most piston fillers.

#15 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 22:58

I really like the design of the Rotring 600 and have a few non-fountain pens from the line. However, I've heard mixed things about the FP, the prices seem too high, and I'm not sure it's comfortable for long stretches of writing. 

 

I actually think I have a Waterman Hemisphere, which I haven't used since like 2002. 

 

This Franklin Christoph pen sounds interesting! I wish I could try one locally. 



#16 OCArt

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 23:08

Great suggestions all.  Since you already have a Lamy Studio why not just get a medium steel nib for that and try it for a while.


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#17 New_Falcon

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 23:20

 

Can you give context for the change in nib preference? I think the Lamy fine is equivalent to the line weight I've been using for 15 years. The only reason why I would get a medium is because I found writing with the Lamy 2000 M to be so, so smooth and enjoyable. Most of what I do is note-taking, and broader nibs seem to be less practical for that practice. See below for an example of how I write. 

 

 

It could well be age and having to wear glasses. I feel I'm writing a little larger now and a bolder line is just more comfortable on the eyes.

 

All of my writing/notes are for myself as for anything professional has to be typed and in fact virtually nothing is on paper either. Horrible powerpoint stuff.


WTT: My Lamy 2000 Fine nib for your Lamy 2000 Broad nib.


#18 GordonOZ

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 23:20

Having 2 Lamy 2000's in ones collection is a top idea, I own the Lamy 2000 with the medium nib and it is my everyday carry pen. What you say about the fine v med is correct and the reason I went for the medium.


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#19 Namo

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 23:23

Excellent choix, la 2K.

I've had up to five 2K at the same time, with various nibs and from various period. For that kind of price you can find a 1st generation 2K, with an 18K gold nib, a different beast. I strongly suggest you try a B nib with this one.
The 2Km (steel) is really heavy and, yes, it scratches easily (I like it, but some don't). If you need to post your 2K as I need to, be aware that the balance of the 2Km isn't great when posted. I use it with a makrolon cap, which works more that excellent. The lack of ink window might bother you.
Third option: keep your money and wait to see if next year Lamy will produce a FP for the 2K 50th anniversary (maybe just a BP again?).

Did you have a look at a Waterman Carene or a Liaison?

Bonne chasse!

Edited by Namo, 29 July 2015 - 23:26.

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#20 piblondin

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 23:32

Great suggestions all.  Since you already have a Lamy Studio why not just get a medium steel nib for that and try it for a while.

I actually have a medium steel nib on my Safari and was just thinking about swapping it with the fine on my Studio. :) 







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