Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

Esterbrook Relief No 66


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 peterg

peterg

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 993 posts

Posted 15 May 2015 - 17:24

I recently acquired the above. It is in bhr with a Parker Duette style top fitting clip that has two pieces cut out like a dollar pen.

The barrel says it is made in England but the screw in steel nib unit says:

 

RELIEF                   (curved over)

BROAD

ESTERBROOK       (curved under)

& Co

MADE IN USA

 

It is a lovely broad, almost italic nib. What I want to know is when did Esterbrook start putting numbers on their nib units? I think it pre dates the Conway Stewart Relief pens, so should be early to mid 1930's but that is purely conjecture.



Sponsored Content

#2 Hobiwan

Hobiwan

    All I ever wanted was a nice pen to write with...

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 830 posts
  • Location:San Dimas, California
  • Flag:

Posted 15 May 2015 - 17:54

Picture?


Best Regards
Paul


“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
– Albert Einstein


#3 Brian Anderson

Brian Anderson

    Esterbrook Nut

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,335 posts
  • Location:Appleton, WI, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 18 May 2015 - 14:20

Conway Stewart Relief pens were actually made fairly late, mid to late 1930's.  This is likely to be the same time period since they are really not at all related.


www.esterbrook.net All Esterbrook, All the Time.

#4 Tom Heath

Tom Heath

    Collectors Item

  • Premium - Ruby

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Location:Wind Gap, Eastern Pennsylvania , USA
  • Flag:

Posted 18 May 2015 - 22:16

Hardy an expert but am a possessor of at least   3  London Made Relief  Esties

 

enjoy

 

Always nice with Factory box and papers : )


penfancier1915@hotmail.com

 

Tom Heath

 

Peace be with you .   Hug your loved ones today


#5 Hobiwan

Hobiwan

    All I ever wanted was a nice pen to write with...

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 830 posts
  • Location:San Dimas, California
  • Flag:

Posted 19 May 2015 - 08:34

:puddle: :puddle: :puddle:

 

Well (he said, mopping up after himself), technically, they started out from the beginning numbering their "pens", which is what the points were called in 1858. 

 

As far as I know, the "314" Relief was the first to make it to a fountain pen.  It is found  on Esty hard-rubber eyedroppers which I'd say were made sometime prior to the CS Reliefs (190x - 191x maybe?).

 

After that, when the Re-new-points on American dollar pens first came out in 1932*, the numbers on them were evolved from many of the dip pens (the "314" became 1314, 2314-F,-M,-B, etc.). 

 

So you could say either 1858 or early 20th century or 1932, depending on viewpoint ...

 

 

* accurate date courtesy of Brian Anderson 

 

 


Best Regards
Paul


“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
– Albert Einstein


#6 nigelg

nigelg

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 553 posts
  • Location:Test Valley, UK
  • Flag:

Posted 19 May 2015 - 11:22

Just thinking out loud but does anyone know why they were called "Relief"? Relief from what - hand strain, eye strain, not having to use a useless or unsuitable nib, relief from indigestion ( no, wait, that was the typhoo pen !). Just seems a rather odd name for a pen.


Yesterday is history.
Tomorrow is a mystery.
Today is a gift.
That's why it's called the present

#7 Hobiwan

Hobiwan

    All I ever wanted was a nice pen to write with...

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 830 posts
  • Location:San Dimas, California
  • Flag:

Posted 19 May 2015 - 18:34

As far as I know, "Relief" is a style of writing that dates back to ancient times.  When scribes trimmed off the end of their reed at an angle rather than straight, they produced more artistic letters with lines that were shaded or thicker on one side and thin on the other.  For instance, on the down stroke, the line was thick, but on the left-to-right, it came out thin ... or vice versa with variations on circular motions, etc., all while holding the pen or reed in the same position throughout.

 

Maybe named "relief" as it kinda mimicked the art form that raises principle items in a piece from a flat background (my guess, not sure).

 

Relief from what?  Bored-looking letters?   :)


Best Regards
Paul


“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
– Albert Einstein


#8 northlodge

northlodge

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,290 posts
  • Location:a little place called Rutland
  • Flag:

Posted 23 May 2015 - 06:29

Relief also relates to contours / gradient variations as in a relief map. Perhaps this is the root, given the un-level nature of the tip.   



#9 wastelanded

wastelanded

    No affiliation.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,111 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 25 May 2015 - 17:25

I have one too, a 2-L, one of my favourite pens.

 

2015-04-28 09.08.38.jpg

2015-04-28 09.09.20.jpg


Edited by wastelanded, 25 May 2015 - 17:26.

"I was cut off from the world. There was no one to confuse or torment me, and I was forced to become original." - Franz Joseph Haydn 1732 - 1809

#10 checkrail

checkrail

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 289 posts
  • Location:Dumfriesshire, Scotland
  • Flag:

Posted 27 May 2015 - 13:28

Just thinking out loud but does anyone know why they were called "Relief"? Relief from what - hand strain, eye strain, not having to use a useless or unsuitable nib, relief from indigestion ( no, wait, that was the typhoo pen !). Just seems a rather odd name for a pen.


Relief is a term from mechanical engineering, I believe, and relates to the creation and adjustment of edges, grooves and surfaces to make something work better and with less strain.
Kind regards
Timothy

#11 peterg

peterg

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 993 posts

Posted 31 May 2015 - 11:03

Sorry for the long delay and poor quality pictures. I don't think this pen is any relation to the Conway produced pens which are a much better quality. The clip attachment method is very unusual for a British manufactured pen2015-05-31 10.56.27 - Copy.jpg 2015-05-31 10.56.27 - Copy.jpg 2015-05-31 11.08.56 - Copy.jpg 2015-05-31 11.20.03 - Copy.jpg 2015-05-31 11.38.17 - Copy.jpg


Edited by peterg, 31 May 2015 - 11:05.


#12 delano

delano

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 570 posts
  • Location:Currently Alabama
  • Flag:

Posted 31 May 2015 - 19:26

I don't know if it falls in the realm of personal opinion or not, but I think the Esterbrook pens were of a tremendous quality.  They've lasted this long, are still going strong, and there are many available still.  As much as I like my newer hand-made pens, I don't think some of them will last as long as my Esterbrook daily driver from the early 40's.  The new ones just seem a bit more fragile.



#13 peterg

peterg

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 993 posts

Posted 01 June 2015 - 22:16

As can almost be seen in the pictures the nib has no numbers on it. Combined with the pattern of the lettering and the fact that it was made in USA rather than England does that help to give a date for the nib and therefore the pen?

 

The style of the pen says 1930-40s to me so logically it either predates the Conway pens or is maybe a war time product?



#14 peterg

peterg

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 993 posts

Posted 20 February 2019 - 15:23

It appears to be a Relief 66

http://www.esterbroo.../relief90.shtml



#15 AAAndrew

AAAndrew

    (Not so) Wee Timorous Beastie

  • FPN Supporter - Rhodium

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,752 posts
  • Location:Durham, NC
  • Flag:

Posted 22 February 2019 - 21:19

Everything Esterbrook ever said about the name pointed to "Relief" meaning that it's much easier to write with than a pointed pen. Stubs were originally designed to be easier to write with, and so a "relief" to write with compared to pointed pens. 

 

An example can be found in the 1885 publication Esterbrook Pens and What They Will Do, under the #314 Relief Pen, they say:

 

As the name implies, it is a relief to write with this pen. Action smooth like old fashioned quill. Not made of steel. Not affected by ink.  Leading Business Pens.

 

 

 

Further supporting evidence that stubs were meant to provide relief from the standard pointed pen is also provided by Esterbrook. I found this justification for making stub pens contained in the history of turned-up points explained by Esterbrook in The American Stationer in 12 February 1889, p. 331


Turned Up Point Pens
 
The first steel pens made in Birmingham about the year 1837, while providing a ready made instrument for penmen, failed to give that ease in writing which was the characteristic of the old quill. They were uniformly fine pointed and naturally more or less scratchy. The remedy for this was not found until a generation later, when the demand for an easier writing pen because imperative. Manufacturers began to make them with blunt and broad points.
 
In 1871 the Esterbrook Steel Pen Company made its first stub pen, No. 161, and now the company has as many as eighteen numbers of stub pens on its catalogue. This did not completely satisfy the demands until the happy idea occurred to turn up the points. This rendered the evolution of the pen complete.
 
In 1876 the Esterbrook Steel Pen Company produced its 1876 Telegraphic, followed shortly after by No. 256 Tecumseh, and No. 309 Choctaw. At the special request of many the Falcon pen was made in this style. Another pen has now been added to the list, and is known as No. 477 Postal. This is a size larger than the Choctaw, with finer points.
 
The perfect ease afforded by these pens contributes one of the most valuable luxuries provided for writers at this end of the century. The penman can write longer with less fatigue than with the ordinary styles. The tediousness of writing is almost entirely avoided, and the relief is so complete that it converts a drudgery into a delight and a pain into a pleasure, and anyone who has taken up one of these turned up point pens for a companion will never consent to be without it.

 

 

 
I have this as well as a brief discussion of the stub pen shape on my website


“When the historians of education do equal and exact justice to all who have contributed toward educational progress, they will devote several pages to those revolutionists who invented steel pens and blackboards.” V.T. Thayer, 1928



Check out my Steel Pen Blog


"No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the mistake is to do it solemnly."

-Montaigne







Sponsored Content




|