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Iroshizuku Take-Sumi—A Handwritten Review

iroshizuku take-sumi iroshizuku black ink take sumi

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11 replies to this topic

#1 mhphoto

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Posted 10 April 2015 - 17:56

I found a stash of old reviews that got misplaced during a house move, so a belated thank you goes out to Terminal, who sent me this and two other Iroshizuku inks to test drive for a review. 

 

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#2 Goudy

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Posted 10 April 2015 - 18:32

The problem with the Brause 66 may be that the sharp point of the nib is slicing through the Rhodia's ink resistant coating on the downstrokes. The upstrokes where lighter pressure is used seem OK.

 

I've used Take-sumi with other dip nibs and Rhodia 80g and experienced no such problems. In fact, it's one of my favourite FP inks for dipping.


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#3 mhphoto

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Posted 10 April 2015 - 20:06

The problem with the Brause 66 may be that the sharp point of the nib is slicing through the Rhodia's ink resistant coating on the downstrokes. The upstrokes where lighter pressure is used seem OK.

 

I've used Take-sumi with other dip nibs and Rhodia 80g and experienced no such problems. In fact, it's one of my favourite FP inks for dipping.

 

Very true, the 66 is sharp, but there are enough cases of no bleeding out with the exact same nib and exact same paper that I can't help but take note when bleedout does occur. 


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#4 inkstainedruth

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Posted 11 April 2015 - 03:38

I haven't quite made up my mind about this ink.  It's pretty expensive, compared to other brands.  And I'm not sure it's the "blackest" ink out there.  

But there's just something about how it goes down on the page.  The best way I can describe how it looks is "velvety" -- as if I were to put my finger down on the page and expect it to have an actual nap to it (just like velvet or velveteen does).  It doesn't have this, of course -- it's not three dimensional and soft and fuzzy -- but there's something about the color when it dries that is just sort of *daring* me to expect to have it be a tactile experience....

Thanks for the review.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


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#5 PS104

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 04:42

The best way I can describe how it looks is "velvety" -- as if I were to put my finger down on the page and expect it to have an actual nap to it (just like velvet or velveteen does).  It doesn't have this, of course -- it's not three dimensional and soft and fuzzy -- but there's something about the color when it dries that is just sort of *daring* me to expect to have it be a tactile experience....

This is the most sensual review of an ink I've ever read

Thank you



#6 inkstainedruth

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 17:00

This is the most sensual review of an ink I've ever read

Thank you

You're welcome.  

I've never had that sort of reaction to an ink before (or since) -- I've liked or disliked inks but they just went down on the page as, well, ink -- wet, dry, loved or hated the color or behavior, whatever.  

Take-sumi was just... different.  It was a really odd experience.

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#7 TSherbs

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 15:56

I have just tried my first sample of this ink. I REALLY like it a lot. I already have three blacks in bottles, so I really don't *need* another one. But none of them look and feel like this velvety, subtle offering. 



#8 Corona688

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 19:32

I heard of people using it for artistic purposes and now I see why. I'm not sure I'd write with it -- slow drying, soft-edged, and the bleeding problem is all too real -- but for inking & shading I LOVE IT.

All its problems in pens are artistic assets. It dilutes smoothly without clumping and, and as a particulate ink (bamboo charcoal) it settles without feathering on proper paper, then migrates very little when re-wetted.

I don't think it sheens -- almost the opposite, the more you thin it, the more you notice. "Velvety" is a good word for just how smooth it is. And it thins to an excellent range of tones for natural things, the colors of stones, storm clouds, old wood, insect wings, et cetera.

Edited by Corona688, 09 August 2018 - 19:39.


#9 Intensity

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 12:22

I heard of people using it for artistic purposes and now I see why. I'm not sure I'd write with it -- slow drying, soft-edged, and the bleeding problem is all too real -- but for inking & shading I LOVE IT.All its problems in pens are artistic assets. It dilutes smoothly without clumping and, and as a particulate ink (bamboo charcoal) it settles without feathering on proper paper, then migrates very little when re-wetted.I don't think it sheens -- almost the opposite, the more you thin it, the more you notice. "Velvety" is a good word for just how smooth it is. And it thins to an excellent range of tones for natural things, the colors of stones, storm clouds, old wood, insect wings, et cetera.


Sorry for resurrecting an old thread, but I haven’t been able to find anything definitive: is Take Sumi a dye ink or pigment particle ink, as the post I quoted claims?

I’ve been curious what will happen if I add a droplet of Take Sumi to a sample of a pale Iroshizuku dye ink like Ina Ho.

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#10 Herrjaeger

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 13:22

As far as I know, Iroshizuku inks are not comprised of ingredients in their names. The names are descriptive and evocative.

#11 EBGBs

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 01:59

I'm not really sure what they are made of, I wouldn't have thought Take-Sumi is made of actual charcoal, and I certainly hope Ku-Jaku is not made of actual peacock!

 

What I can say however is that I have always found Iroshizuku inks mix very well. I have made mixes with Yama-Budo, Tsuki-Yo, Syo-Ro, Take-Sumi, Asa-Gao, Kosumosu and Tsutsuji, and have never had any problem.

I don't have Ina-Ho, but I just recently put some Take-Sumi in some Syo-Ro to darken the latter, and again no issue at all. So I would suggest you try your idea



#12 Intensity

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 09:49

EBGBs, on 22 Jan 2019 - 01:59, said:
EBGBs, on 22 Jan 2019 - 01:59, said:I'm not really sure what they are made of, I wouldn't have thought Take-Sumi is made of actual charcoal, and I certainly hope Ku-Jaku is not made of actual peacock

That would be a relief! Now looking for a “No peacocks were harmed in making this ink” on the label... :D

Thank you for the reassurance about mixing. Does Take Sumi add extra shading or simply make your mixture darker?

Edited by Intensity, 22 January 2019 - 09:52.

“I admit it, I'm surprised that fountain pens are a hobby. ... it's a bit like stumbling into a fork convention - when you've used a fork all your life.” 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: iroshizuku take-sumi, iroshizuku, black ink, take sumi



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