Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

Lathe Recommendation?

lathe repair pens

  • Please log in to reply
53 replies to this topic

#21 Jamesbeat

Jamesbeat

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Location:NY

Posted 25 March 2015 - 22:00

 
I don't find this; I don't put oil anywhere that it would get on the chips in any appreciable amount.
 
--Daniel


This is a real problem for me. I keep my ways oiled, and chips fall on them and stick to the oil.
Also, I apply oil to the workpiece and to the tool tip, which I have read is important, because it cools and lubricates the cut.

Not being obnoxious, I'm genuinely interested to know how you keep oil away from your chips so I can shamelessly copy you :D

Sponsored Content

#22 kirchh

kirchh

    Please see my Profile interests

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,583 posts

Posted 25 March 2015 - 22:19

This is a real problem for me. I keep my ways oiled, and chips fall on them and stick to the oil.
Also, I apply oil to the workpiece and to the tool tip, which I have read is important, because it cools and lubricates the cut.

Not being obnoxious, I'm genuinely interested to know how you keep oil away from your chips so I can shamelessly copy you :D

 

My version of the lathe has oil ports and way wipers in the carriage, and I only apply a tiny bit of oil, so there's the thinnest of films on the ways.

 

My understanding is that the greatest benefit of using cutting fluid (which may or may not be oil) is to keep the temperature of the tool from rising to the point where it affects the temper. This, I think, is mostly applicable to HSS (high speed steel) tooling, and the need for this measure is related to the size of the workpiece, the rotational speed of the spindle, and the depth of the cut, as well as the material being turned (and probably other factors I'm forgetting). I don't think I have ever had a combination of those factors that came anywhere close to causing a cutting tool to hit a temperature that would have affected its temper; these little lathes just aren't big or muscular enough to get to that zone. Lubrication can also produce a better finish.

 

When I do feel like a bit of lubrication is needed to make a cut easier or better, I like to use a Tap-Ease stick (very convenient and not messy), or WD-40 (which is essentially kerosene) for aluminum. I do use some cutting lube when drilling, as there is a lot of friction involved, and it helps quite a bit; WD-40 is great for this situation, as you can squeeze off a little shot right into the hole. WD-40 also seems to go away pretty fast, and it has the side benefit of displacing water (WD...get it?), so it can help keep things from rusting.

 

However, I very rarely use any coolant or lubrication when performing turning operations on the minilathe. I just don't see the benefit -- plus, as you've found, it can make a mess.

 

--Daniel


"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe


#23 Jamesbeat

Jamesbeat

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Location:NY

Posted 25 March 2015 - 23:01

Ok thanks Daniel.
I tend to use carbide cutters myself, and you're probably right that no cooling is really necessary.
I'll clean off my lathe and try out your method.

#24 kirchh

kirchh

    Please see my Profile interests

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,583 posts

Posted 25 March 2015 - 23:07

Ok thanks Daniel.
I tend to use carbide cutters myself, and you're probably right that no cooling is really necessary.
I'll clean off my lathe and try out your method.

 

I've taken a liking to the hard-to-find indexable HSS inserts. They take a sharper edge than the carbide inserts have, resulting in easier cutting, and they can be touched up easily with a stone. No chipbreaker groove, but that's really not an issue in our setting.

 

--Daniel


Edited by kirchh, 25 March 2015 - 23:10.

"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe


#25 Nanor

Nanor

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 187 posts

Posted 25 March 2015 - 23:13

After much deliberation and a final moment of weakness, I just overspent on a Warco WM180.

I wont be buying any more pens for quite a while, but not having touched a lathe since I was a young apprentice (many years ago), I'm looking forward t seeing what I can turn out.

 

My thanks to all for this very helpful and informative thread.



#26 Jamesbeat

Jamesbeat

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Location:NY

Posted 26 March 2015 - 00:46

After much deliberation and a final moment of weakness, I just overspent on a Warco WM180.
I wont be buying any more pens for quite a while, but not having touched a lathe since I was a young apprentice (many years ago), I'm looking forward t seeing what I can turn out.
 
My thanks to all for this very helpful and informative thread.


Congratulations :D

Now you have a lathe, loads of previously impossible projects will suddenly occur to you.
You may well feel like you overspent now, but that won't last long when you fully appreciate all the things you are now equipped to do.

Just think, you may not NEED to buy any more pens...

#27 serpent

serpent

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 178 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 31 March 2015 - 20:24

Just wondering what peoples thoughts were on a Taig micro lathe?



#28 kirchh

kirchh

    Please see my Profile interests

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,583 posts

Posted 31 March 2015 - 22:43

Just wondering what peoples thoughts were on a Taig micro lathe?

 

Not much power; not easy to do threading.

 

--Daniel


"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe


#29 Jamesbeat

Jamesbeat

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Location:NY

Posted 01 April 2015 - 16:11

I stated above, I'm no expert, but that Taig lathe looks very limited, more like a beefed-up jeweller's lathe.
Is that a direct drive motor?

My advice is to buy the biggest lathe that you can afford and accommodate.

For me, that was the HF 7x12, because I live in an apartment and don't have a garage.

I reached the limit of what it was capable of almost immediately. The second thing I turned was 12" long, and I had to make it in two sections (I couldn't turn it between centers).

Thing is, once you have a lathe, you start thinking of all these things you can make on a lathe.
You may buy it specifically for pens, but I can almost guarantee that you will make other things on it.

I think that, even if it is indeed suitable for pens, you would outgrow that Taig lathe in very short order.

#30 TREBFPN

TREBFPN

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 20 April 2015 - 06:11

I have made a lot of repairs, and money, using a little HF lathe over the last 12 years.  It has it's limitations, but it is a little workhorse. 

I have been looking for a lathe and I wish to know what limitations this one has?  It will help me search for one more suited for my needs.  Please tell?

Thank you in advance :)



#31 Jamesbeat

Jamesbeat

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Location:NY

Posted 20 April 2015 - 11:14

The limitations are mainly due to size.
The standard advice is to buy the biggest lathe you can afford and accommodate.
If you only want to use it for pens, the bed length should be fine.
If, like me, you want to turn an 11" lightsaber, you will have to get creative :)
Go to minilathe.com and look in the 'capabilities' section.
That should give you an idea of what you can do on one of these lathes.

#32 TREBFPN

TREBFPN

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 21 April 2015 - 08:51

Thank you.   :)  What I am really trying to see is if there is a main difference between these 7" x 12" lathes.  The Harbor Freight is  $486.99 ($599.99 - 20% coupon + $6.99 shipping) and the Grizzly is $574.99 ($495.99 + $79.00 shipping).  The Harbor Freight has the 2 acrylic windows but I hear Grizzly's customer service is a lot better than theirs.  I am curious what experience persons have had with their lathe?

 

 

Attached Images

  • metal lathe.jpg


#33 Ron Z

Ron Z

    Museum Piece

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,644 posts

Posted 21 April 2015 - 13:47

My understanding is that they're made in the same factory.  They're pretty much the same lathe, with minor specification changes, i.e. things like the power switch and the chuck and chip shields on the HF. I took the one on the tool post off and bypassed the interlock switch  on the chuck shield so that I can use a larger 4 jaw chuck.   You shouldn't have your fingers or shirt sleeve near either while the lathe is running.  They're like "lawyer lips" on a bicycle fork.

 

Watch for the sales at HF.  With a sale and the 20% off coupon you can buy them for under $400 before tax.  Shipping will be more than $6.95 because of the weight I'd wager.  A trip to the store would be worth it.

 

Plan on some extras(read goodies) from Little Machine Shop to make either more versatile.  Stock up on the 3 amp fast blow 5X20MM fuses too.  You'll need them.  Get the tool post  or a tool bit in the way when you turn the motor on and it'll stop dead, blowing the fuse.  You can't just run to Radio Shack and buy a couple more anymore.


banner200.jpg
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.


#34 Jamesbeat

Jamesbeat

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 497 posts
  • Location:NY

Posted 21 April 2015 - 21:05

Ron Z, when did you buy your lathe?
The reason I ask is that I read that the electronics had been updated at some point.

My lathe (bought a couple of months ago) has 'crashed' a couple of times while I was getting the hang of it, and it just cut out, no blown fuse.

All I had to do to start it up again is turn the power knob down all the way to 0 and it reset itself.

This happened on at least two occasions before I got it through my thick skull to be more careful!

Although I had no damage or blown fuses, I hasten to add that this is not a good thing to do!
I'm more used to using a lathe now, and I haven't had any accidents recently.

Also, I too removed the safety guards.
They seem like a good idea until you actually try using the lathe with them in place.
I found that they fouled on each other when trying to turn workpieces near the chuck.

#35 Ron Z

Ron Z

    Museum Piece

  • FPN Super Moderators

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,644 posts

Posted 21 April 2015 - 21:45

I have had the one I'm using for about 10 years.  It sees a lot of use.  Even when I buy a larger lathe I'll hang onto it because it has a tumbler gear, so can cut left hand threads, unlike some of the larger ones. 


banner200.jpg
Visit Main Street Pens
A full service pen shop providing professional, thoughtful vintage pen repair...

Please use email, not a PM for repair and pen purchase inquiries.


#36 FarmBoy

FarmBoy

    Brain freeze, mmm... got pens?

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,118 posts
  • Location:SFO USA

Posted 21 April 2015 - 23:51

I looked at these lathes and discovered I'm spoiled.  I also decided I can't quit my day job because I'd loose access to the machine shop...


San Francisco International Pen Show - They have dates! August 23-24-25, 2019 AND August 28-29-30, 2020. Book your travel and tables now! My PM box is usually full. Just email me: my last name at the google mail address.

#37 kirchh

kirchh

    Please see my Profile interests

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,583 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 01:16

I looked at these lathes and discovered I'm spoiled.  I also decided I can't quit my day job because I'd loose access to the machine shop...

 

You are spoiled. When we have these limited little lathes we have to make parts to improve them...using our lathes (OK, a mill comes in pretty handy too).

 

--Daniel


"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe


#38 GAtkins

GAtkins

    Collectors Item

  • Premium - Emerald

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,007 posts
  • Location:Springdale, Arkansas
  • Flag:

Posted 22 April 2015 - 02:16

 

You are spoiled. When we have these limited little lathes we have to make parts to improve them...using our lathes (OK, a mill comes in pretty handy too).

 

--Daniel

 

Daniel,

 

What kind of mill do you have?

 

Glenn



#39 kirchh

kirchh

    Please see my Profile interests

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,583 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 02:50

 

Daniel,

 

What kind of mill do you have?

 

Glenn

 

A Harbor Freight minimill. It's fun.

 

--Daniel


"The greatest mental derangement is to believe things because we want them to be true, not because we observe that they are in effect." --Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

Daniel Kirchheimer
Specialty Pen Restoration
Authorized Sheaffer/Parker/Waterman Vintage Repair Center
Purveyor of the iCroScope digital loupe


#40 TREBFPN

TREBFPN

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 22 April 2015 - 18:15

Thank you for the advice!  I agree

 

My understanding is that they're made in the same factory.  They're pretty much the same lathe, with minor specification changes, i.e. things like the power switch and the chuck and chip shields on the HF. I took the one on the tool post off and bypassed the interlock switch  on the chuck shield so that I can use a larger 4 jaw chuck.   You shouldn't have your fingers or shirt sleeve near either while the lathe is running.  They're like "lawyer lips" on a bicycle fork.

 

Watch for the sales at HF.  With a sale and the 20% off coupon you can buy them for under $400 before tax.  Shipping will be more than $6.95 because of the weight I'd wager.  A trip to the store would be worth it.

 

Plan on some extras(read goodies) from Little Machine Shop to make either more versatile.  Stock up on the 3 amp fast blow 5X20MM fuses too.  You'll need them.  Get the tool post  or a tool bit in the way when you turn the motor on and it'll stop dead, blowing the fuse.  You can't just run to Radio Shack and buy a couple more anymore.

 

 

Thank you for all the advice!  I have been looking through the classifieds and forums for a lathe and ironically, in these classifieds and forums I notice people looking to buy missing parts for their newly purchased "used" lathes.  Also, I have seen some buyers finding out that they could have purchased a factory fresh lathe - on sale - for the price they paid on their lesser quality used lathe.  I definitely will buy new and get the 7" x 12" Harbor Freight when it goes on sale.  It looks well designed and has some top quality features.  It would only cost more just to add a few of these necessary features onto a nice beginner's or lower end lathe.  Given all that you have told me, this lathe is a sure winner and I hate to lose ;)

Thank you everyone :D







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lathe, repair, pens



Sponsored Content




|