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When Inks Look Good In Contrast

ama-iro kon-peki yama-guri lie de thé

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#1 SenZen

SenZen

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 17:54

I'd been meanining to write about this for some time, it won't be a revelation to anyone, but I was prompted into action by a recent and great review of Ama -Iro. This isn't a deep comparison of inks, I just want to deal with the topic of colour contrast. When I got this ink I though "oh dear", I felt I'd made a mistake, which is easy to do when you buy on the Internet, without the possibility of seeing the ink in person.

 

But then a funny thing happened, this ink has grown on me, I really like it now, although nothing has really changed, except while writing I happen to use it next to Kon Peki, which was another "I'm not sure I like this" ink: to me they look really good size by side, they seem to bring out the best in each other, as well as next to other specific inks.

 

fpn_1426354418__img_0294a.jpg

 

So the lesson is to take into account the context of the ink, which includes the light, as well as the paper and the other inks you use it with.

 

Kon-Peki looks a lot closer to Ama-Iro with a broader nib, in this case going from a lamy F to an M, so much so I would find it hard to use both at the same time.


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

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