Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies






Photo

A Dialogue With The Lamy Dialog 3

lamy dialog 3 retractable bi-color palladium 2000 twist

  • Please log in to reply
66 replies to this topic

#61 vonManstein

vonManstein

    Themoldypeaches

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 481 posts
  • Location:London
  • Flag:

Posted 04 February 2016 - 22:24

Gosh, that was an excellent price. I bought mine (the "piano black" version) from Pen Sense in Nottingham (UK) for twice that. I decided to buy from a local dealer since we've used them before and, the owner is a pen expert, so it's an enjoyable experience buying from there.

 

The nib is medium width but compared to the Pilot, quite broad, yet finer than my older Parker 51. The ink flow is quite generous. I enjoy using it a great deal but, rather like my Pilot, it isn't entirely smooth yet (but distinctly smoother than the Pilot). Neither pen is suited to the Rhodia paper I've just bought with each skipping on strokes occasionally. I'm waiting to try out some Pilot ink and Japanese paper to see the effect on smoothness and ink flow.

 

It is always best to buy from brick and mortar place. I would avoid a lot of disappointment if I would do this more often. But this online deal was just to good to resist. 


Inked: Sailor King Pro Gear, Cross Townsend, Aurora 88 Unica Nera, Aurora Optima Grey Flex, Parker Sonnet Chiselled Carbon, Montblanc 149, Delta Dolcevita Oversize, Nakaya Long Cigar Aka-tamenuri.

Sponsored Content

#62 Scampo

Scampo

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 05 February 2016 - 07:39

I agree - it is a fine experience to buy from such a shop. The owner is a bit of a character in his dickie bow, too! My Lamy dried today after a few days of not being used, rather to my surprise. This has never happened to the Pilot or Faber Castell. I had to refill it to get it flowing again. I've read from others that that can happen to it and that the Pilot has a better seal. That was Interesting for such an expensive pen.



#63 Scampo

Scampo

    NOS (New Old Stock)

  • Member - Silver

  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 11 February 2016 - 07:38

My new Lamy has started drying out. I hope it's a one off and that by the weekend I'll be enjoying it again!

 

http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/topic/245872-advice-on-lamy-dialog-3-purchase-nib-dry-out-issue/ 



#64 EenyBear

EenyBear

    Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 56 posts

Posted 09 March 2018 - 17:44

Saw one of these in person for the first time yesterday.  A new-version Lamy Dialog 3.  Previously didn't know they existed.  This example was the "silver" version with a "M" nib.  

 

I got a fairly thick wet line from this version of an "M" nib...  I would prefer a "F" or even "EF" if/when I make a purchase.  Very smooth writer, though.  A thing of beauty.

 

The open/close mechanism is smooth, with no 'looseness' detected.  Little hidden ball cap is quite elegant and according to the owner, the pen does not dry out in his experience.  As a pharmacist, he uses it daily and often so consider that.

 

My one observation is that the pen was quite heavy.  In generally, it spoke to the quality of construction.  Not a problem in and of itself... I have several heavier pens... but it felt 'nib-heavy' in the balance.

 

Most of my pens tend to be ever so slightly 'cap heavy' so, when posted, the pen rests comfortably in the crook between thumb and forefinger.  Of course, this is the result of taking a cap, and its associated mass, and transferring it to the opposite end to the pen when in use.  

 

With this pen, the weight shifts even further nib-ward when the nib extends.  Easy to visualize.  There was a slight impression that the pen was sliding out of my grip.  Especially with the smooth finish.  I'm sure the sensation would either disappear over time or I would learn to cope (!).  The owner agreed but assured me it was not an issue for him (average hands, average strength, etc.).

 

Overall, a work of art and a beautiful writer.


Edited by EenyBear, 09 March 2018 - 17:47.


#65 sannidh

sannidh

    Finding Eternity

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 991 posts
  • Location:The Milky Way
  • Flag:

Posted 10 March 2018 - 02:18

Saw one of these in person for the first time yesterday.  A new-version Lamy Dialog 3.  Previously didn't know they existed.  This example was the "silver" version with a "M" nib.  

 

I got a fairly thick wet line from this version of an "M" nib...  I would prefer a "F" or even "EF" if/when I make a purchase.  Very smooth writer, though.  A thing of beauty.

 

The open/close mechanism is smooth, with no 'looseness' detected.  Little hidden ball cap is quite elegant and according to the owner, the pen does not dry out in his experience.  As a pharmacist, he uses it daily and often so consider that.

 

My one observation is that the pen was quite heavy.  In generally, it spoke to the quality of construction.  Not a problem in and of itself... I have several heavier pens... but it felt 'nib-heavy' in the balance.

 

Most of my pens tend to be ever so slightly 'cap heavy' so, when posted, the pen rests comfortably in the crook between thumb and forefinger.  Of course, this is the result of taking a cap, and its associated mass, and transferring it to the opposite end to the pen when in use.  

 

With this pen, the weight shifts even further nib-ward when the nib extends.  Easy to visualize.  There was a slight impression that the pen was sliding out of my grip.  Especially with the smooth finish.  I'm sure the sensation would either disappear over time or I would learn to cope (!).  The owner agreed but assured me it was not an issue for him (average hands, average strength, etc.).

 

Overall, a work of art and a beautiful writer.

 

Like you, I do believe it's a beautiful pen, but the weight certainly put me off!

Thanks for sharing your unique experience with the dialog, I certainly couldn't agree more with you :)

With a little sweaty fingers, it does slip a bit, like all metal sections, however it's not as that bad I think for the love of the dialog :D


You have come to earth to entertain and to be entertained - P.Y

 

Some Pen & Paraphernalia Reviews


#66 dapprman

dapprman

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 822 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 10 March 2018 - 12:00

I find you get used to it very quickly.  I might be holding mine slightly further forwards/nibwards than you as I find it a very well balanced pen despite the weight.  Mine is my EDC, permanently attached to a Midori Passport Traveller by the smaller (clip) pen loop.



#67 ErrantSmudge

ErrantSmudge

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,206 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Flag:

Posted 12 March 2018 - 19:07

One thing I haven't seen mentioned is that though this pen is a cartridge-converter, it's a little unusual because of its retractable nature.  The nib section unscrews and slides out of the pen.  You can install a cartridge, or fill with a converter from a bottle, then reinstall the section into the pen body.

 

You can clean the section by sucking in water with the converter, like any other CC pen.  But because the section has a metal upper cage surrounding the converter section, you cannot bulb-flush this pen because the metal cage doesn't allow the bulb nozzle to connect with the section.

 

I don't think this is a deal-breaker, but it is of note for serial ink-switchers.

 

 

And regardless, the Dialog 3 holds way more ink than the Vanishing Point.   :D


Edited by ErrantSmudge, 12 March 2018 - 19:09.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lamy, dialog 3, retractable, bi-color, palladium, 2000, twist



Sponsored Content




|