Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

What Technically Superior Pens?

lamy 2000 pilot vanishing point twsbi 580 pilot murex

  • Please log in to reply
53 replies to this topic

#41 Nanor

Nanor

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 187 posts

Posted 12 February 2015 - 01:22

My best (most enjoyable) writer is a Waterman 52 so I'm not convinced technology is moving us in the right direction?



Sponsored Content

#42 Blade Runner

Blade Runner

    Blade Runner

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,166 posts
  • Location:Secret Volcano Lair
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 01:51

The ballpoint of course.



#43 AZBennett

AZBennett

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 02:02

Technically superior or technologically advanced or aesthetically innovative or a mix of all three? It's hard for me to say. I would have to go back a bit to truly list what I find fill these bills. In no particular order.

 

W-E Doric Adjustable nib design and technology

Early reservoir pens in general as a form of ink supply when traveling

Sheaffer Snorkel technology

The Eversharp Nib with elongated breather hold

Skyline breather tube technology allowing for reliable air travel with a FP

Skyline clip and clip retainer system has always fascinated me

Eversharp feed technology

Parker Lucky Curve technology

Vacumatic filling systems

Parker 51 nib design and reliability

Lamy 2000 (owes a lot to the previous entry, imo)

Montblanc marketing (I don't care what you say they are geniuses at it)

Pilot innovation as a whole (Capless, 823, nib quality control is FANTASTIC, Falcon)

Waterman Keyhole/Colored nibs as far as aesthetics are concerned

The Bulb Filler and safety pens are both wonderful, imo

 

Maybe I am just not as picky as some or I really look at things differently than most, but when repairing pens I get to "know" a pen on a different level than viewing it as just an inanimate object made to jot notes down. Most of them take on quite a bit of personality, even when it just comes to nib tuning or feed adjusting. Putting some time into a pen brings it to life and there are some truly amazing design features that are hard to ignore. I probably haven't even scratched the surface.

 

Paul



#44 Cob

Cob

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,774 posts
  • Location:Berkshire, England
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 09:38

 

What if the user can control how much ink flows without replacing nibs?

You mean like on a 1910 Onoto?!

 

Cob


fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


#45 Cob

Cob

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,774 posts
  • Location:Berkshire, England
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 09:40

Technically superior or technologically advanced or aesthetically innovative or a mix of all three? It's hard for me to say. I would have to go back a bit to truly list what I find fill these bills. In no particular order.

 

W-E Doric Adjustable nib design and technology

Early reservoir pens in general as a form of ink supply when traveling

Sheaffer Snorkel technology

The Eversharp Nib with elongated breather hold

Skyline breather tube technology allowing for reliable air travel with a FP

Skyline clip and clip retainer system has always fascinated me

Eversharp feed technology

Parker Lucky Curve technology

Vacumatic filling systems

Parker 51 nib design and reliability

Lamy 2000 (owes a lot to the previous entry, imo)

Montblanc marketing (I don't care what you say they are geniuses at it)

Pilot innovation as a whole (Capless, 823, nib quality control is FANTASTIC, Falcon)

Waterman Keyhole/Colored nibs as far as aesthetics are concerned

The Bulb Filler and safety pens are both wonderful, imo

 

Maybe I am just not as picky as some or I really look at things differently than most, but when repairing pens I get to "know" a pen on a different level than viewing it as just an inanimate object made to jot notes down. Most of them take on quite a bit of personality, even when it just comes to nib tuning or feed adjusting. Putting some time into a pen brings it to life and there are some truly amazing design features that are hard to ignore. I probably haven't even scratched the surface.

 

Paul

A good list, but you forgot the brilliant Onoto plunger vacuum-filling system introduced in 1905.

 

Cob


fpn_1428963683__6s.jpg “The pen of the British Empire” fpn_1423349537__swan_sign_is.jpg


#46 Algester

Algester

    (´Д⊂ヽ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,786 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 13:02

gel ink! haha

#47 mirosc

mirosc

    I love the smell of ink in the morning

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,622 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 14:55

Among all new pens [...] demonstrate a technical achievement in pen technology?

 

none

with one exception: Pilot Parallel

the rest is just  some fancy materials, some little refinement, but basically it's still the same old technology that has been around for decades

 

just my personal opinion and the reason why I don't differentiate between my vintage and modern pens, they are all alike.


Greetings,
Michael

#48 AZBennett

AZBennett

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 20:24

Cob,
I have no experience with Onoto, much to my dismay, that's why I didn't include it in my list. Truthfully, I have never personally held a Doric either but they are amzing pens so I had to add them. I am sure I was remiss in other areas but I tried to list as many as I could think of.

Paul

#49 Cordovian

Cordovian

    Oh, shiny.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 869 posts
  • Location:Cordova, TN
  • Flag:

Posted 12 February 2015 - 20:44

I like Delta's ratcheted piston filling system in my Dolce Vita IT (stands for Italian Technology by the way). Does that make them technologically advanced? 



#50 FOUR X FOUR

FOUR X FOUR

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,389 posts
  • Location:Florida
  • Flag:

Posted 15 February 2015 - 03:37

[attachment=300110:image.jpg]

#51 JimCouch

JimCouch

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 503 posts
  • Location:Portland, Oregon

Posted 15 February 2015 - 07:18

It's not a fountain pen but to me the one technically advanced pen is the Fisher Space Pen. It writes in virtually any temperature, in a vacuum, underwater, upside down. The pens will write next to forever and are incredibly reliable.


Jim Couch Portland, OR

#52 ink-syringe

ink-syringe

    foo

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,716 posts
  • Location:Seoul, Korea
  • Flag:

Posted 15 February 2015 - 12:20

When I was younger (grade 6), I used to rotate the pen and write with the nib upside down when I wanted to write fine. I tried this with the Lamy and it works too, but it will be nice if pen manufacturers do something to support this style. I.e. you can write medium when you want, and simply turn the pen to write fine, without any scratching etc.

 

That's what the Parker 180 was about.

 

 

http://www.richardsp...rofiles/180.htm


Looking for a cap for a Sheaffer Touchdown Sentinel Deluxe Fat version

 

#53 ajcoleman

ajcoleman

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 661 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 15 February 2015 - 19:44

When I read the original post, the Parker 51 immediately came to mind. The hooded nib and feed, the sliip on cap with the clutch, the easy aeromatic filling system were all technical achievements. I haven't used one, but Parker considered the 61 with its capillary self-filling action to be a more technologically advanced pen over the 51. 


Adam
Dayton, OH

It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings.

-- Prov 25:2


#54 arcadeflow

arcadeflow

    Vintage

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 769 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 15 February 2015 - 22:48

When I was younger (grade 6), I used to rotate the pen and write with the nib upside down when I wanted to write fine. I tried this with the Lamy and it works too, but it will be nice if pen manufacturers do something to support this style. I.e. you can write medium when you want, and simply turn the pen to write fine, without any scratching etc.

 

Sailor has some nibs with this kind of functionality, check it out.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lamy 2000, pilot vanishing point, twsbi 580, pilot murex



Sponsored Content




|