Jump to content

The Fountain Pen Network uses (functional) cookies. Read the FPN Privacy Policy for more info.  To remove this message, please click here to accept the use of cookies


Registration on the Fountain Pen Network

Dearest Visitor of the little Fountain Pen Nut house on the digital prairie,

Due to the enormous influx of spammers, it is no longer possible to handle valditions in the traditional way. For registrations we therefore kindly and respectfully request you to send an email with your request to our especially created email address. This email address is register at fountainpennetwork dot com. Please include your desired user name, and after validation we will send you a return email containing the validation key, normally wiithin a week.

Thank you very much in advance!
The FPN Admin Team






Photo

What Technically Superior Pens?

lamy 2000 pilot vanishing point twsbi 580 pilot murex

  • Please log in to reply
53 replies to this topic

#21 Sasha Royale

Sasha Royale

    Ancient Artifact

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,444 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 06 February 2015 - 19:25

1.  1884 Waterman -- It had an osmotic feed to control flow of ink onto the paper.

2.   Parker Lucky Curve -- "self-filling" fountain pen.


Auf freiem Grund mit freiem Volke stehn. 
Zum Augenblicke dürft ich sagen: 
Verweile doch, du bist so schön ! 


Sponsored Content

#22 RajAlexander

RajAlexander

    Near Mint

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPip
  • 36 posts
  • Location:Kent-England
  • Flag:

Posted 06 February 2015 - 19:43

The TWSBI 580 been tagged though not mentioned yet, a good, solid, fully user serviceable piston filler with all the tools included.  Someone mentioned the 1911 earlier, this is probably the piston filling equivalent of the AK-47.  Surely that's a first?



#23 Randal6393

Randal6393

    Love italic handwriting.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,518 posts
  • Location:Charlotte, NC
  • Flag:

Posted 06 February 2015 - 20:12

Technical virtuosity? Don't see that so much. Trying to meet the customer's needs? Well, that all depends. Seems as if very few companies spend much time or concern finding out what the customer needs or wants. As befits a generally conservative tool like the fountain pen, I will admit.

 

I would shout out Nathan Tardiff and his pens as great examples of a willingness to experiment and yet adhere to the basic technology. His Nib Creaper was a first attempt at providing low-cost flexible nibs. Went to the Ahab because the Creaper was not enough of a good thing. Needed the larger nib to help with the flex, needed a larger ink capacity. So he went with a piston-converter, definitely a large capacity combined with a tried-and-true converter system.  When the Ahab seemed to be too much pen for many customers, he designed the Konrad. Now whatever you feel about Mr. Tardiff's politics and personality, you owe it to yourself to try one of his pens and see if it is for you. If you are looking for an inexpensive flex pen.

 

Me, I have several Ahabs and Konrads and feel that they are great pens for the money. I don't mind adjusting the pens for my convenience, in fact, I enjoy that aspect of the pens.

 

Have fun,


Yours,
Randal

From a person's actions, we may infer attitudes, beliefs, --- and values. We do not know these characteristics outright. The human dichotomies of trust and distrust, honor and duplicity, love and hate --- all depend on internal states we cannot directly experience. Isn't this what adds zest to our life?
 


#24 thatotherguy1

thatotherguy1

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 303 posts

Posted 07 February 2015 - 02:40

The TWSBI 580 been tagged though not mentioned yet, a good, solid, fully user serviceable piston filler with all the tools included.  Someone mentioned the 1911 earlier, this is probably the piston filling equivalent of the AK-47.  Surely that's a first?

Not, IMHO, until the cracking issue is fully alleviated. The takedown part of it is nice and helpful, but to call it a reliability standard in its field would be a bit ambitious. I know that the cracking was more of an issue on the 540, but IIRC there have been reports of cracks forming in non abused 580s. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

That said, the 580 is an incredible pen for its price. Having a decent quality piston filler sell for $55 is almost unheard of, let alone a well designed one such as the TWSBI. I don't yet have one, but that will change eventually.

I'll concur on the Lamy 2000. No, it isn't cutting edge now, but it was so well designed in the 60s that it's still relevant now without being changed. There are rather few pens, I would imagine, that were designed as the company's flagship 50 years ago and still retain that position, being continually produced for all that time with almost no changes. It's a great design IMHO.


Here to help when I know, learn when I don't, and pass on the information to anyone I can :)


#25 Arkanabar

Arkanabar

    Ain't I a stinker?

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,918 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 03:42

It's really, really hard to surpass the aero-metric Parker "51" for technical excellence, when the goal is a reliable, well-behaved, effortless writing instrument.

 

Of course, for gee-whiz technological coolness, none of my pens surpass my PFM, last of Sheaffer's Snorkel fillers, and the first of their inlaid nib pens.



#26 Icywolfe

Icywolfe

    I <3 Anime

  • FPN Supporter - Platinum

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,271 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 04:12

Pilot Justus95 and Justus. Adjustable nib. Then the Sailor's special nibs. Pilot Falcon nib which is like a modern flex.

#Nope


#27 Algester

Algester

    (´Д⊂ヽ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,789 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 04:37

technically superior fountainbel has used CONID as a stepping stone to his engineering skills with the bulk filler so CONID maybe expensive but that filler
Pilot Capless Japan ingenuity got the best of it you really have to check the pen's history to see how much Pilot's designers experimented with the pen to this point (case in point a lever trap door with gravity aiding the sliding of the nib)
Pilot's Shiro nib who says steel nib can't be flexible it simply rivals vintage flex yes BETTER THAN NOODLER'S
Pilot's nomikomi-shiki a gravity filler for lack of better sense of word...
http://estilofilos.b...komi-shiki.html
Pilot's Justus it's there with the Capless
Pilot's pulsating plunger filler which is now known as the CON-70 is it different from a normal button filler in some ways it was as it didnt used a membrane
http://estilofilos.b...2/07/shiki.html
Pentel's .2 mm lead seriously... .2 MM lead
Steadler's clutch less 2MM mechanical Pencil (Japan branch)
Steadler Japan is different in that any "pencil" with a 2MM lead is technically called a clutch pen but they made it into a mechanical pencil even at 2MM
hsLIQkN.jpg
Mitsubishi's/uni-ball Kuru-toga
Platinum's failed attempt at a suspension pencil that Zebra took it further and called it the Delguard
Tombow's Air Press
Ohto's Pro mecha (I mean where can you find a pencil where you can highly configure your lead release per press)


Japan has the weirder stuff but hey thats Japan... people still consider it the land of the weird

Edited by Algester, 07 February 2015 - 04:44.


#28 stevekolt

stevekolt

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 307 posts
  • Location:WV
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 04:50

 

Thought the homo sapiens with lava had a hidden converter system and only the crystal editions had the power filler

 

 
 

 

Well it's all about execution of the design.

The maxi size, both bronze age, and steel age now come with the power filler system...



#29 Waski_the_Squirrel

Waski_the_Squirrel

    Forum Squirrel

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,087 posts
  • Location:North Dakota
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 05:31

Two (possibly 3) came to mind.

 

1. The Lamy 2000 is a great example of a lot of existing technologies being brought to their peak and truly refined.

 

2. The Pilot Custom 823 is a surprising pen. It writes well, has a bit of flex, and has a nifty filling system.

 

3. I'm going to add the Noodler's Konrad, mostly because it takes old and some luxury technologies and puts them into an affordable package.


Proud resident of the least visited state in the nation!

#30 Pickwick

Pickwick

    Pickwick

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,932 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 07 February 2015 - 05:55

I have the Rotring Initial which has the technological advance of an air pressure control system, claimed to work at a height of 30,000 feet. If anyone is interested, I have over the past four years been trying to get sponsors for an expedition to the Himalayas and climb mount Everest, in order to prove this claim!

 

My appeal to you guys has been disappointing so far.


They came as a boon, and a blessing to men,
The Pickwick, the Owl and the Waverley pen

Sincerely yours,

Pickwick


#31 brunico

brunico

    Collectors Item

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,184 posts
  • Location:London
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 06:08

I think most of these examples are just minor improvements to existing technology. Retractable nibs, and even adjustable nibs, have been around a long time. Newer examples may be technically superior, but I wouldn't count them as an achievement, just a refinement.

 

The Sailor double-layered nibs - and even triple-layered nibs - look innovative to me, and the Pilot Parallel is a radically different concept of the nib from anything that had gone before. It solves the problem of very broad nibs (having three tines means an extra tine to keep in adjustment), and I'm sure it would be possible to go beyond the 6mm that Pilot offers.



#32 Algester

Algester

    (´Д⊂ヽ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,789 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 09:13

I have seen something wacky from Japan though pelikan nibs facing each other that may look like the 360 nib... it looks like a drafting pen on steroids...

#33 canadian

canadian

    Mint

  • Member - Bronze+

  • PipPipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • Location:Québec
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 19:15

When I was younger (grade 6), I used to rotate the pen and write with the nib upside down when I wanted to write fine. I tried this with the Lamy and it works too, but it will be nice if pen manufacturers do something to support this style. I.e. you can write medium when you want, and simply turn the pen to write fine, without any scratching etc.


"But it is the same with humanity as with the tree. The more he seeks to rise into the height and light, the more vigorously do his roots struggle earthward, downward, into the dark and deep – into the evil." - Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. Thus Spoke Zarathustra.


#34 Oldane

Oldane

    Extremely Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 20:34

There are many, but if we define "technically superior pen" as pens which  are rugged daily writers which work flawlessly year in and year out and which is easy to handle (filling, cleaning, ink capacity), the Pelikan piston fillers come to my mind. It's not at all a new technology - it's from around 1930 - but it is still today one of the best and most reliable pens money can buy so there's not really any need to change it's design.



#35 jar

jar

    A Vintage Pen has to be older than me.

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 26,162 posts
  • Location:From Deep South Texas
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 22:34

When I was younger (grade 6), I used to rotate the pen and write with the nib upside down when I wanted to write fine. I tried this with the Lamy and it works too, but it will be nice if pen manufacturers do something to support this style. I.e. you can write medium when you want, and simply turn the pen to write fine, without any scratching etc.

 

There have been many pens designed just for that, none successful enough to warrant their continuation.


My Sister's website :  Rose Hill Studios

My Website


#36 Joe in Seattle

Joe in Seattle

    Donor Pen

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,525 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Washington
  • Flag:

Posted 07 February 2015 - 22:53

+1 Visconti Homo Sapiens. It writes differently than any other pen I own. I enjoy writing with it like no other.
"how do I know what I think until I write it down?"

#37 SenZen

SenZen

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,980 posts

Posted 08 February 2015 - 03:06

For me technical superiority has to do with reliability, durability, ergonomics, not so much with technical prowess; so for instance a computer which doesn't have the latest processor or a gazilion RAM but does have a reliable operating system is technically superior. Of my pens, and I don't have the widest range or extensive experience with vintage, my Pelikan m400 amazes me because it writes smothly, has never ever failed even when not cleaned for a long time, is comfortable to hold, lets me see ink levels, survived during my period of pen destruction (I didn't know any better), and the nib is gorgeous; while Waterman, Lamy and unknown brands have all have problems. Muji is the other brand that has never failed, it's a shame they don't sell the converters at the store.


"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

B. Russell

#38 FOUR X FOUR

FOUR X FOUR

    Antique

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,389 posts
  • Location:Florida
  • Flag:

Posted 08 February 2015 - 03:24

Technical virtuosity? Don't see that so much. Trying to meet the customer's needs? Well, that all depends. Seems as if very few companies spend much time or concern finding out what the customer needs or wants. As befits a generally conservative tool like the fountain pen, I will admit.
 
I would shout out Nathan Tardiff and his pens as great examples of a willingness to experiment and yet adhere to the basic technology. His Nib Creaper was a first attempt at providing low-cost flexible nibs. Went to the Ahab because the Creaper was not enough of a good thing. Needed the larger nib to help with the flex, needed a larger ink capacity. So he went with a piston-converter, definitely a large capacity combined with a tried-and-true converter system.  When the Ahab seemed to be too much pen for many customers, he designed the Konrad. Now whatever you feel about Mr. Tardiff's politics and personality, you owe it to yourself to try one of his pens and see if it is for you. If you are looking for an inexpensive flex pen.
 
Me, I have several Ahabs and Konrads and feel that they are great pens for the money. I don't mind adjusting the pens for my convenience, in fact, I enjoy that aspect of the pens.
 
Have fun,


👍👍👍👍👍

Edited by FOUR X FOUR, 08 February 2015 - 03:25.


#39 Algester

Algester

    (´Д⊂ヽ

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,789 posts
  • Flag:

Posted 09 February 2015 - 11:27

There have been many pens designed just for that, none successful enough to warrant their continuation.

but the Hero 360 still seems to be around but I think I saw something... I'm not sure how useful it would be but to some it might be a horrific example...
its related to the Pelikan nibs I stated on my previous post but...
KqpNNpW.jpg
from a nib guy in Japan... from the site of...

#40 Fountainer

Fountainer

    Rare

  • Member - Gold

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 123 posts
  • Location:Finland
  • Flag:

Posted 09 February 2015 - 12:02

I would vote for Aurora piston fillers. They have the backup reservoir system, that allows you to magically get a bit more ink from it when you though it was empty already. I like the idea and like their designs.


There are other ways than the easiest one too.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lamy 2000, pilot vanishing point, twsbi 580, pilot murex



Sponsored Content




|