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Pelikan Vs. [The World]

pilot twsbi lamy mont blanc

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22 replies to this topic

#1 canadian

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 01:15

I learnt about Pelikan through a blog post titled "A Lawyer and his Pen", in which a monsieur avocat understood that Mont Blanc does not offer the same quality of service as TWSBI. Someone replied to his post and recommended a Pelikan. I thus researched this company and thereupon tried a few pens at my local store.

 

Although I didn't spend much time on the pens, I felt little difference between a M200/600 and Pilot (forgot the model) or Lamy 2000 -- all using the same ink.

 

The store owner told me with a smile that Pelikan is a writer's pen, and he has many customers who write for a living, and actually use a Pelikan to make a living. (The only reason I didn't buy a Pelikan is due to its price in Canada. I've settled on a TWSBI and am waiting for its delivery.)

 

So although this topic has been discussed to death, for people who have owned a few other brands, how does Pelikan compare service/durability wise to others?


"But it is the same with humanity as with the tree. The more he seeks to rise into the height and light, the more vigorously do his roots struggle earthward, downward, into the dark and deep – into the evil." - Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. Thus Spoke Zarathustra.


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#2 carlos.q

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 01:23

I have TWSBI, Lamy 2000 and Pelikan pens.
I prefer Pelikans. :)

#3 canadian

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 01:26

I have TWSBI, Lamy 2000 and Pelikan pens.
I prefer Pelikans. :)

 

Thanks, if I may request you to elaborate on the following:

 

1. Why and when did you buy other brands? (i.e. before Pelikan or after)

2. Why do you prefer Pelikan?


"But it is the same with humanity as with the tree. The more he seeks to rise into the height and light, the more vigorously do his roots struggle earthward, downward, into the dark and deep – into the evil." - Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. Thus Spoke Zarathustra.


#4 risingsun

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 01:37

Pelikan is my #1 brand and both vintage and modern pens are outstanding. I have a soft spot for Lamy, particularly the 2000 and an array of vintage piston-fill offerings. I'd call Lamy my #2 favorite. I've got a large collection of vintage Parkers and Sheaffers. They are great, too. Edison appeals to the artisan-appreciator in me. Pilot, Platinum, Mont Blanc and Waterman have places in the collection, but they are just token representatives. It pretty much always comes back to the Pelikans. Ease of cleaning, maintenance, nib swapping, classy looks, a wide range of prices and colors, and a great feel in the hand, coupled with the best filling system in the pen world; it all makes the brand a well-respected, top-tier manufacturer.

By the way, you're going to get massively biased responses asking this question in the Pelikan forum.

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#5 carlos.q

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 01:38

Thanks, if I may request you to elaborate on the following:
 
1. Why and when did you buy other brands? (i.e. before Pelikan or after)
2. Why do you prefer Pelikan?

I bought the TWSBI and Lamy 2000 after some of my Pelikans and before the rest.
The TWSBI Mini is nice but it's fragile. I clipped it to my bag and the clip broke off. The clip was immediately replaced by the manufacturer.
The Lamy 2000 is a great pen. So much that I have two.
That being said I really prefer my Pelikans (M205, 400, 400NN, 100N). They are lighter than the 2000 and the nibs are frankly awesome!!!

Edited by carlos.q, 05 February 2015 - 01:42.


#6 sargetalon

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 01:48

I have owned and used all of the pens that you mentioned, all before I got involved with Pelikan. Once I found Pelikan, I fell in love and sold all the others. There was nothing wrong with the others but they didn't capture my fancy like Pelikan does.

Why Pelikan? It's hard to put into words. They are incredibly well balanced in my hand (I post), hold a ton of ink, have a very clear ink view window, and are piston fillers which I prefer. The nibs are user interchangeable which is a big plus. They are very easy to clean and overall low maintenance. I find the finish is durable. The vintage models are just as solid today as when they were released plus I contend that vintage Pelikan nibs are as good as any out there. That's all the physical characteristics that I favor. I also really like the history of the company and how they've grown over the years. It's a neat journey when you read about it. Finally, they offer excellent service, not that I've needed it very often. I own just over 90 Pelikans and love everyone of them. I highly recommend an honest trial, perhaps with an M200 to start, before passing any judgement on the brand.

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#7 canadian

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 03:00

Between the time I posted this and now, I discovered that one of my favorite authors, Niel Gaiman, uses among others, all the above pens.....


"But it is the same with humanity as with the tree. The more he seeks to rise into the height and light, the more vigorously do his roots struggle earthward, downward, into the dark and deep – into the evil." - Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. Thus Spoke Zarathustra.


#8 fountainpenlady

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 03:59

I learnt about Pelikan through a blog post titled "A Lawyer and his Pen", in which a monsieur avocat understood that Mont Blanc does not offer the same quality of service as TWSBI. Someone replied to his post and recommended a Pelikan. I thus researched this company and thereupon tried a few pens at my local store.

 

Although I didn't spend much time on the pens, I felt little difference between a M200/600 and Pilot (forgot the model) or Lamy 2000 -- all using the same ink.

 

The store owner told me with a smile that Pelikan is a writer's pen, and he has many customers who write for a living, and actually use a Pelikan to make a living. (The only reason I didn't buy a Pelikan is due to its price in Canada. I've settled on a TWSBI and am waiting for its delivery.)

 

So although this topic has been discussed to death, for people who have owned a few other brands, how does Pelikan compare service/durability wise to others?

Well, I have been a pen collector for a while. My collection is miniscule now compared to others. Yet, I have had Montblancs and Pelikans. My opinion is that I love my Pelikans. I have two from the 90s. They are each different from each other and yet together they are my go to writing instruments. You are talking about apples and oranges when it comes to Pelikans, and Lamys. I have three of those also. Lamy pens, in my humble opinon, are pens you use for casual use. You don't mind writing your class notes, or a quick note, or giving it to someone when they say, "let me see your pen?" You don't feel the same about a Pelikan. A Pelikan is a Lexus, Acura, or Volvo. You write with it when you want to correspond to someone important, or someone you care about, or the message is important. You can also write a poem, or write in your journal several pages as I often do. Those who know and appreciate pens also know a Pelikan and would not dare to ask, unless they are rive gauche. The Pelikan pen, like the distinction of the white capped Montblanc are a different breed.  I also had some experience with Pelikans in terms of service, the times I have had to use the repair department in MA, they did not hesistate to service my pen, they communicated to me regarding my pen. Even, like recently, when I asked about a nib I wanted to swap out, (today, as a matter of fact) they were honest, it would take more time then I care to wait, but gave me the options. The response was within minutes of emails sent, as if I had called them with answers to my questions.  Apologies, I used to be a writer in my former existence, and can be long-winded. These are simply thoughts off the top of my head. I have not had any experience with any of my Lamys, they are work horses and easy going in tems of not needing much, except converters perhaps over the years as options.


Edited by fountainpenlady, 05 February 2015 - 04:07.

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#9 fountainpenlady

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 04:10

I have owned and used all of the pens that you mentioned, all before I got involved with Pelikan. Once I found Pelikan, I fell in love and sold all the others. There was nothing wrong with the others but they didn't capture my fancy like Pelikan does.

Why Pelikan? It's hard to put into words. They are incredibly well balanced in my hand (I post), hold a ton of ink, have a very clear ink view window, and are piston fillers which I prefer. The nibs are user interchangeable which is a big plus. They are very easy to clean and overall low maintenance. I find the finish is durable. The vintage models are just as solid today as when they were released plus I contend that vintage Pelikan nibs are as good as any out there. That's all the physical characteristics that I favor. I also really like the history of the company and how they've grown over the years. It's a neat journey when you read about it. Finally, they offer excellent service, not that I've needed it very often. I own just over 90 Pelikans and love everyone of them. I highly recommend an honest trial, perhaps with an M200 to start, before passing any judgement on the brand.

 

I have owned and used all of the pens that you mentioned, all before I got involved with Pelikan. Once I found Pelikan, I fell in love and sold all the others. There was nothing wrong with the others but they didn't capture my fancy like Pelikan does.

Why Pelikan? It's hard to put into words. They are incredibly well balanced in my hand (I post), hold a ton of ink, have a very clear ink view window, and are piston fillers which I prefer. The nibs are user interchangeable which is a big plus. They are very easy to clean and overall low maintenance. I find the finish is durable. The vintage models are just as solid today as when they were released plus I contend that vintage Pelikan nibs are as good as any out there. That's all the physical characteristics that I favor. I also really like the history of the company and how they've grown over the years. It's a neat journey when you read about it. Finally, they offer excellent service, not that I've needed it very often. I own just over 90 Pelikans and love everyone of them. I highly recommend an honest trial, perhaps with an M200 to start, before passing any judgement on the brand.

Wow! "...just over 90?" :notworthy1:


Edited by fountainpenlady, 05 February 2015 - 04:11.

Ea Alis Volat Propiis, per/Repletus Fontis Calamus!
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Delta DolceVita, F-C Intrinsic 02, Pelikan M800 red/black striation, Bexley ATB Strawberry Swirl, Red Jinhao 159, Platinum 3776 Bourgogne.  :wub:


#10 fountainpenlady

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 04:14

I bought the TWSBI and Lamy 2000 after some of my Pelikans and before the rest.
The TWSBI Mini is nice but it's fragile. I clipped it to my bag and the clip broke off. The clip was immediately replaced by the manufacturer.
The Lamy 2000 is a great pen. So much that I have two.
That being said I really prefer my Pelikans (M205, 400, 400NN, 100N). They are lighter than the 2000 and the nibs are frankly awesome!!!

I have been doing some research on purchasing a TWSBI, I appreciate your experience and impression of them. Particularly, since I tend to post, I was interested in the mini version. Although your personal experience was not monumental in my final impression, just wanted to say thank you for sharing. I am now leaning towards an Omas Ogiva Alba.


Edited by fountainpenlady, 05 February 2015 - 04:18.

Ea Alis Volat Propiis, per/Repletus Fontis Calamus!
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Delta DolceVita, F-C Intrinsic 02, Pelikan M800 red/black striation, Bexley ATB Strawberry Swirl, Red Jinhao 159, Platinum 3776 Bourgogne.  :wub:


#11 Trebor

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 05:48

i can't speak really to durability, because I've only owned my Pelikans for a relatively short time. My M800 I've had for a year and a half or so, and the M600 that I just sold off was about 3 or 4 years old and it was in excellent condition. 

 

However, I do think that my M800 is my favorite pen and by far the best writer. My experience with brands is relatively narrow -- I've used Pilots, Waterman, Lamy, although not very many of each brand. But in my (limited) experience, my Pelikan's nib far outperforms any of my other pens. 

 

In addition to the nib, I really like the physical pen itself. My M800 has got a very nice length, weight, and heft, for me at least. I know people that don't like its size, but for me, it's just nice to hold in the hand. The stripes, the styling, the look all appeal to me much more than, say, a Montblanc. Now, don't get me wrong, Montblancs are fine pens, but they have a very conservative feel to them. And that's absolutely fine, but as personal preference, I like Pelikan's colors and styling a lot more.

 

I'll also echo sargetalon's comment about their company and history. Although I don't (yet) own any vintage Pelikans, I find that Pelikan has a very rich history. I understand that it's a real intangible thing, but I'll give you an personal take. I walked into a Montblanc boutique recently and a sales rep asked me if I knew anything about Montblanc history. I said, "Yes, only a little, it started in the late 1800's or early 1900's, they started off with fountain pens, blah blah." And the rep comes back to me and says, "Oh, yes, but I mean, you know that we are owned by Richemont now, right? The same company that owns Cartier, and we maintain our exclusiveness by making very limited products." Pelikan on the other hand, remains blissfully free of this image/burden, and they stick to what they do best -- making great pens, every bit as good (if not better) than any of their competitors.

 

So, I do own and enjoy other pens, and I think the world would be a bit more boring place if it was filled only with, excellent as they are, Pelikans. However, it's the only pen I own that consistently makes me smile and just play with it and stare at the finish. In other words, my Pelikan makes me genuinely happy as I use it. And that's what it's really all about, isn't it?


Edited by Trebor, 05 February 2015 - 05:56.


#12 Bobby Check

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 05:53

Pelikan service has always given me great service.

 

However you may want to look at the Pilot 823 over the Omas. Just remember the Pilot medium nibs write like a  European fine and so on.

 

Enjoy

 

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#13 fountainpenlady

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 06:30

Pelikan service has always given me great service.

 

However you may want to look at the Pilot 823 over the Omas. Just remember the Pilot medium nibs write like a  European fine and so on.

 

Enjoy

 

Bobby

 

Pelikan service has always given me great service.

 

However you may want to look at the Pilot 823 over the Omas. Just remember the Pilot medium nibs write like a  European fine and so on.

 

Enjoy

 

Bobby

I write with an extra fine nib exclusively. Initially, at one point I had a Pilot VP, the extra fine was too fine, the fine was a tad bit not as thin as I would have enjoyed. I also did not like the grip of the pen. I opted later for a Pilot Decimo, currently selling it on the MarketPlace. Although thinner in circumference, the nibs issue was still the same since they use the same nibs. As a result, personally, I am unimpressed with Pilots. Just my experience.


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Delta DolceVita, F-C Intrinsic 02, Pelikan M800 red/black striation, Bexley ATB Strawberry Swirl, Red Jinhao 159, Platinum 3776 Bourgogne.  :wub:


#14 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 12:20

Everyone needs a single modern Pelikan....do buy at that store near you, and not by mail. You want that store to be there for the rest of your life.....buy your modern pens there....not by mail.

 

Vintage and semi-vintage has better nibs than modern.

Then one needs three semi-vintage with nice 'true'** regular flex nibs with a bit of spring from '82/3-97. You need one that eats cartridges and the Celebry has a very nice nib.The '87-89 W.Germany 800...a grand regular flex nib with that fine bit of spring......The Germany '90-97 will be very good.

A 400 of that era.

Then of course you need two vintage 400-400n or 400nn's from '50-65...with a semi-flex nib or a 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex nib.

 

** many pen companies including Pelikan make semi-nail nibs now, instead of real regular flex.

 

Do take your time. You have a life time to gather the better pens. It has taken me some 6 years to get a nice selection of 13 Pelikan pens. Some were luck, in I'd never expected to have the money for some that I got (Money was back from vacation just in time)....one was a true Somgi......some guy got a great buy.

Never hurry and pay too much for a vintage pen....there will be another next week or next month.

 

Is Pelikan the best....no. But of the best....Osmia, Geha, Kaweco and vintage MB are others of the same rank of German pens.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 05 February 2015 - 12:21.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

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#15 fountainpenlady

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 13:18

Everyone needs a single modern Pelikan....do buy at that store near you, and not by mail. You want that store to be there for the rest of your life.....buy your modern pens there....not by mail.

 

Vintage and semi-vintage has better nibs than modern.

Then one needs three semi-vintage with nice 'true'** regular flex nibs with a bit of spring from '82/3-97. You need one that eats cartridges and the Celebry has a very nice nib.The '87-89 W.Germany 800...a grand regular flex nib with that fine bit of spring......The Germany '90-97 will be very good.

A 400 of that era.

Then of course you need two vintage 400-400n or 400nn's from '50-65...with a semi-flex nib or a 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex nib.

 

** many pen companies including Pelikan make semi-nail nibs now, instead of real regular flex.

 

Do take your time. You have a life time to gather the better pens. It has taken me some 6 years to get a nice selection of 13 Pelikan pens. Some were luck, in I'd never expected to have the money for some that I got (Money was back from vacation just in time)....one was a true Somgi......some guy got a great buy.

Never hurry and pay too much for a vintage pen....there will be another next week or next month.

 

Is Pelikan the best....no. But of the best....Osmia, Geha, Kaweco and vintage MB are others of the same rank of German pens.

In America, there are many places which do not have brick and mortor stores anywhere near.  For instance, I remember many years ago in New York City buying my pens from an actual store named Joon. All of my pens came from the same place, the main store. I got to know Mr. Joon and he knew of me. I also knew of his children and the staff over time. I even moved away from NYC and yet when interested in a pen, all I had to do was call and Mr. Joon would answer the phone and remembered me. I have heard his stores closed years ago, flagship and the others. (Used to take a train at Grand Central Station to and from Connecticut and remember there being a store right in the train station).

There remains to my knowledge The Fountain Pen Hospital, but it is not an actual Pen Store. Therefore, perhaps, adjustments might be considered to the suggestion of one going to an actual store for a writing instrument. Losing out on having an experience with a writing instrument would be a sad one because there is not an actual store near. Perhaps, like several have indicated elsewhere, as they are anticipating soon to their areas, travel to a Pen Show when it comes near; it is worth the travel depending on funds and distance. There might be someone else interested in writing instruments, can share costs. A Pen show will allow you to not only see, test pens you may be interested in, such as  Pelikans, in some cases you can get valuable information, tips, see Limited Editions. You can also meet and have a Nib Meister whose name you may have run across in threads here work on the nib to your particular taste, some even while you wait. You can begin and continue putting names to faces, particularly if you live in a big city where Pen Shows may be annual events.  Subsequently, you can communicate with certain pen stores, via telephone or internet and a relationship continues to be established. 


Edited by fountainpenlady, 05 February 2015 - 13:39.

Ea Alis Volat Propiis, per/Repletus Fontis Calamus!
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Delta DolceVita, F-C Intrinsic 02, Pelikan M800 red/black striation, Bexley ATB Strawberry Swirl, Red Jinhao 159, Platinum 3776 Bourgogne.  :wub:


#16 Wolverine1

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 16:53

TWSBI pens are essentially a cheap Taiwanese made copy of Pelikan pens.  I use my Pelikan pensand refuse to buy Taiwanese or Chinese made knock-offs.



#17 DrCodfish

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 19:08

I learnt about Pelikan through a blog post titled "A Lawyer and his Pen", in which a monsieur avocat understood that Mont Blanc does not offer the same quality of service as TWSBI. Someone replied to his post and recommended a Pelikan. I thus researched this company and thereupon tried a few pens at my local store.

 

Although I didn't spend much time on the pens, I felt little difference between a M200/600 and Pilot (forgot the model) or Lamy 2000 -- all using the same ink.

 

The store owner told me with a smile that Pelikan is a writer's pen, and he has many customers who write for a living, and actually use a Pelikan to make a living. (The only reason I didn't buy a Pelikan is due to its price in Canada. I've settled on a TWSBI and am waiting for its delivery.)

 

So although this topic has been discussed to death, for people who have owned a few other brands, how does Pelikan compare service/durability wise to others?

 

The thread title made me smile.  Coming to the Pelikan forum and asking how these pens compare is like going to Hershey PA and asking "Which is better, Chocolate or Strawberry?"  I don't have much to add to the conversation, most of the important points for me have been mentioned.

 

I'm not a writer (not published) but I facied myself on that path when I was young and imagining who I might become.  So, in the late 60's I bought a Pelikan 120.  An entry level pen to be sure, but in my mind it was a 'writers' pen and it was also a little more money than I could afford, but I bought it anyway.

 

I have been writing and journaling (and writing letters) ever since.  I still have that pen and though it went on hiatus in the 1990's it has made a comeback and after a little some fiddling and some simple work by Rick Propas, the pen is back in the cigar box now and makes it's way into the rotation every so often

 

I have close to 100 pens now, and a fair amout of them are Pelikans, most of which have cost me more than that old 120.  There is no way of knowing how long it will continue to serve, but I'd like to think that one of my kids will inherit this pen and put it to some good use.  The stories it has told, and those which it coud tell are part of the pen's value to me.  I woudn't take $1,000 for that old pen, and I wouldn't pay $10.00 for once just like it. 



#18 parnesh

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 21:43

I have atleast one pen from TWSBI, Pilot and Pelikan and a couple of Lamy 2000. Personally I find the smaller pelikans m400-m200 and even m600 a bit too small. Enjoying my new m1000 although in hindsight it is BIG! They are great pens. However as an everyday carry, it is hard to go past the Lamy 2000. Built like a tank, great nibs and a snap cap.

 

My award however would go to Pilot. Only company where I have had no issues with nibs out of the box and I have 6 or 7 of their pens. Even their $15 Metro writes on par with a pelikan steel nib.



#19 Kathleen48

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 22:08

I also still have my original Pelikan 120.  It took somewhat of a hiatus in the 90s due to a few new Waterman pens.  But no matter what - I keep coming back to my Pelikans.  I also have 4 400s (2 green striped and 2 tortoise) and a beautiful  Souveran 1000.  Somehow the 120s (I have several of them) get used most.  I don't worry about carrying them aound - and I use them around the house without worry since they were all inexpensive.  They just keep on writing without problems.


Edited by Kathleen48, 05 February 2015 - 22:08.

Kathleen


#20 Songyi

Songyi

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 01:19

TWSBI pens are essentially a cheap Taiwanese made copy of Pelikan pens.  I use my Pelikan pensand refuse to buy Taiwanese or Chinese made knock-offs.

While there are a lot of similarities, I can hardly say that TWSBI is blatantly "knocking off" Pelikan pens. I don't think anybody will mistaken a $50 TWSBI with any decent Pelikan pen.

 

I have to agree and say that I enjoy writing with Pelikans much more than TWSBIs, but for what their goal is and what they market their pens as (affordable homage to a classic writing instrument with innovative aesthetics), I'd say TWSBI is doing a great job and deserves their popularity.


“My two fingers on a typewriter have never connected with my brain. My hand on a pen does. A fountain pen, of course. Ball-point pens are only good for filling out forms on a plane.”
Graham Greene





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: pilot, twsbi, lamy, mont blanc



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