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Desiderata Woodglass Flex Pen: A Quick First Impression

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59 replies to this topic

#21 Polanova

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 21:49

OK, Polanova, sorry.

 

I've been using flex dip pens for years and moved away from them in favor of springy nib + brush combination. Because brush gives me even broader strokes and more ways of texture without pressing hard. And for the convenience of fountain pen instead of inkwell.

 

 

Hey no reason to be sorry!

It seems that for me the "springy nib & brush" combo works also best for final art stuff!

Am still exploring more, shall we say, loose drawing/sketching with flex nibs & am also eagerly awaiting one of those Sailor specialty nibs, where you get line variation not by applying pressure but be slightly changing the angle of the pen. Once I got that, I have all potentially useful FP-nibs for drawing. I`ll see how it goes  :)



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#22 Polanova

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 21:58

 

Pictogramax explained nicely above. But I wanted to comment on the fitting a G nib into a Noodler's Nib Creaper:

 

You CAN do it, but you have to cut and grind much of the nib off. (The problem would not be fitting the nib with the feed, but the diameter of the nib itself is too wide to fit into the pen's section.) It takes a long time to get the measurements just right. For me, it's worth it to pay more money for a pen that's easier to put together.

 

Now, you can fit a G nib into a Noodler's Ahab or Konrad by shaving the sides of the feed, as I have detailed in this topic: http://www.fountainp...-noodlers-ahab/

 

That said, while my hack is cheaper, it's not as consistent an experience as using a Desiderata pen. The Desiderata's feed does a better job in keeping up with the required ink flow, too.

 

Ok thanks. You have just convinced me NOT to try that!

 

I still tend not to get the Desiderata, `cause:

 

_too expensive

_the looks of it & the wood/pen combo doesn`t exactly rock the fish of my chips, so to speak

_have quite a number of fairly flexible vintage pens, which, while not being überflex, seem flexible enough for drawing & my unambitious calligraphic attempts

_in doubt if überflex nibs are that useful for drawing



#23 TeaHive

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 22:00

Ah, I realized I forgot to ask.

 

Linda, does the wooden piece just provide lovely decoration on the end of the tank, or does the hollow space go all the way down (albeit narrower in that segment)? Either way, that's a lot of ink capacity!



#24 TeaHive

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 22:01

 

Ok thanks. You have just convinced me NOT to try that!

 

I still tend not to get the Desiderata, `cause:

 

_too expensive

_the looks of it & the wood/pen combo doesn`t exactly rock the fish of my chips, so to speak

_have quite a number of fairly flexible vintage pens, which, while not being überflex, seem flexible enough for drawing & my unambitious calligraphic attempts

_in doubt if überflex nibs are that useful for drawing

 

Bold segment is my doing, because it made me laugh!



#25 PrestoTenebroso

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 22:30

 

Ok thanks. You have just convinced me NOT to try that!

 

I still tend not to get the Desiderata, `cause:

 

_too expensive

_the looks of it & the wood/pen combo doesn`t exactly rock the fish of my chips, so to speak

_have quite a number of fairly flexible vintage pens, which, while not being überflex, seem flexible enough for drawing & my unambitious calligraphic attempts

_in doubt if überflex nibs are that useful for drawing

1&2. I sell a $50 delrin pen that is nigh indestructible. Considering the time you'd have to put into modifying an Ahab or nib creaper to get it to work, you could just buy that one and get to drawing sooner.

 

3. If you damage a vintage flex pen, you're up the creek, since vintage pen or gold nib repair ain't cheap.

4. Have you used one?



#26 NobleDel

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 22:43

Pierre,

Sorry I missed their initial sale.

Will you be making any more WoodGlass pens?


Edited by NobleDel, 21 January 2015 - 22:49.


#27 Linda Medley

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 01:38

Crikey. This is what happens when my internet connection gets dropped for a day.

 

Polanova, for me this pen--and other flexible-nibbed pens--are very useful for drawing; I do primarily pen-and-ink illustration for a living. However, I didn't mean that I use ONLY flex pens for drawing--I also use brush pens, rigid nibs, semi-flex, fude, and even knives (when I do sgraffito).  It all depends on how I want the finished drawing to look; if I want it to convey a particular mood or time period, for instance.  I would likely not use the WoodGlass for sketching, because the nib is more suited to making slower, more controlled marks. I would likely use a semi-flex, tipped nib along with a fude or brush pen for sketches (specifically, I carry 3 Pelikan M215s in my field set: one with a rigid Medium nib, and 2 with custom Richard Binder nibs: an xFine/Xflex, and a Condor fude-style nib).

 

As for nib/pen direction, I turn my hand for horizontal strokes; otherwise, I just rotate the page. In the sample I posted, I tried to show the type of line the Desiderata pens can make when used for drawing; most of the samples here on FPN tend to focus on writing or calligraphy, and when an artist is researching a particular pen, it would be helpful for them to have an example of drawing as well. They can decide for themselves if they are interested in working in that style. I don't believe there's any one perfect "artist's pen"--far from it; I think an artist needs as many tools as it takes to make as many types of marks as they want.

 

TeaHive, the clear tank does indeed extend into the wooden end--I stuck a skinny knitting needle down in it to find out. It holds 2.4 ml, enough for a whole ink sample!

 

Pictogramax--Thanks so much. What can I say; your drawing is fantastic, and illustrates perfectly how different types of marks work beautifully together in one drawing.



#28 PrestoTenebroso

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 03:43

Pierre,

Sorry I missed their initial sale.

Will you be making any more WoodGlass pens?

In the next several months.



#29 Linda Medley

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:27

Pierre, is your delrin Daedelus convertible to eyedropper-fill, or is it strictly a sac-filler?



#30 PrestoTenebroso

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:41

Pierre, is your delrin Daedelus convertible to eyedropper-fill, or is it strictly a sac-filler?

It is, but you know me, I'm not thrilled with eyedroppers in my flex pens. 



#31 NobleDel

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 09:19

In the next several months.

Great news! Thanks very much.



#32 Polanova

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 19:14

 

Polanova, for me this pen--and other flexible-nibbed pens--are very useful for drawing; I do primarily pen-and-ink illustration for a living. However, I didn't mean that I use ONLY flex pens for drawing--I also use brush pens, rigid nibs, semi-flex, fude, and even knives (when I do sgraffito).  It all depends on how I want the finished drawing to look; if I want it to convey a particular mood or time period, for instance.  I would likely not use the WoodGlass for sketching, because the nib is more suited to making slower, more controlled marks. I would likely use a semi-flex, tipped nib along with a fude or brush pen for sketches (specifically, I carry 3 Pelikan M215s in my field set: one with a rigid Medium nib, and 2 with custom Richard Binder nibs: an xFine/Xflex, and a Condor fude-style nib).

 

As for nib/pen direction, I turn my hand for horizontal strokes; otherwise, I just rotate the page. In the sample I posted, I tried to show the type of line the Desiderata pens can make when used for drawing; most of the samples here on FPN tend to focus on writing or calligraphy, and when an artist is researching a particular pen, it would be helpful for them to have an example of drawing as well. They can decide for themselves if they are interested in working in that style. I don't believe there's any one perfect "artist's pen"--far from it; I think an artist needs as many tools as it takes to make as many types of marks as they want.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for your answer  :)

I agree that multiple tools are necessary & I believe you inspired me to give more flexible nibs another chance for drawing!



#33 Polanova

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 19:25

1&2. I sell a $50 delrin pen that is nigh indestructible. Considering the time you'd have to put into modifying an Ahab or nib creaper to get it to work, you could just buy that one and get to drawing sooner.

 

3. If you damage a vintage flex pen, you're up the creek, since vintage pen or gold nib repair ain't cheap.

4. Have you used one?

 

1&2:

TeaHive has already convinced me that it`ll be too much hassle for me to tinker around with Noodler`s.

I like the Delrin`s look even less, but hey, tastes are highly subjective  :P

3:

Absolutely agree!

4:

No, as I said, I`m in doubt.

 

Now I might get one after all (looks aside; they`re not everything  :) )


Edited by Polanova, 22 January 2015 - 19:45.


#34 Linda Medley

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 19:42

 

 

Thanks for your answer  :)

I agree that multiple tools are necessary & I believe you inspired me to give more flexible nibs another chance for drawing!

 

That rocks the fish of my chips, Polanova :D



#35 Polanova

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 19:59

 

That rocks the fish of my chips, Polanova :D

 

To up the ante: I just bought one!

See, sometimes I just need a little prodding  :)



#36 TeaHive

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 20:20

That didn't take long. :P Another convert!



#37 Polanova

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 20:36

You just caught me in flagranti on a rare impulse buy  :o !

 

Together with the Sailor specialty nib pen (en route as we speak) I`ve just spent a fortune this month (gulp)!!

At least, with both pens, it`s all about nibs & performance, not esthetics  B)


Edited by Polanova, 22 January 2015 - 20:36.


#38 pictogramax

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 20:43

And I just bought the next one! Linda and TeaHive, you should get some presents for successful marketing :-)



#39 hypnostene

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 21:33

Wow, what great writing and drawing. I was planning to write a longer review of the Mercury, but now I will be afraid to post any of my own writing samples.

 

But I agree with the conclusion. It does what it's supposed to do very well.



#40 TeaHive

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 21:51

And I just bought the next one! Linda and TeaHive, you should get some presents for successful marketing :-)

 

A great pen sells itself. :) I'm merely happy to own one, and eager to share the love.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: desiderata pens, flex, zebra g-nib, eyedropper, dip nibs, drawing pen, de atramentis document ink



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