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Calligraphy Set Id

calligraphy set no name

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#1 Manalto

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 03:46

Recently I bought a calligraphy pen set that is not identified (link below). Can anyone tell me the manufacturer along with any comments you may have? Thanks!

James


James


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#2 rickap

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 04:22

Hi James,

If it is the one with multiple ink cartridges it looks like one with the name Panache. There are also similar sets named Manuscript and Elegant Writer out there. I've not used them, but I have used Osmiroid and Sheaffer calligraphy sets. I'm sure your set will be fun as it also looks to have a converter so you can use bottled ink.

You might also want to post this in the Calligraphy Discussions sub forum under Creative Expressions.

Calligraphy is fun! Enjoy!

Rick
Rick

#3 Manalto

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 11:43

Thanks, Rick. It appears to be the Manuscript brand. Yes, it was definitely the converter that sold me. For what I paid, it looks like I could have bought it new. Oh, well. This will be my first venture into calligraphy.

 

James


James


#4 Manalto

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 12:48

The pen set arrived and I've tried it out with a couple of the nibs. Filling is by a plunger mechanism (like a hypodermic needle - sorry for my ignorance of the proper term) and it is STIFF. In fact, I have to pinch the converter to hold it in place as I'm drawing ink. It's cheaply made, but it works, and considering the price of the entire set, comes as no surprise. The body of the pen itself is flimsy plastic; care needs to be taken so the brass ring between the barrel and nib assembly doesn't get lost, as it falls off when the nib is removed. These pens are obviously for amateurs who want dabble in calligraphy; any serious enthusiast will probably move up to better equipment very quickly.

 

This is my first venture into calligraphy/italic writing (my instruction book hasn't even arrived yet) but so far I like it. The wider nibs demand such large writing that they're impractical for everyday applications, but the narrow ones are a blast. Scratchier, of course, but once the sweet spot is located, flow reasonably well. The beauty of the line variation in ordinary cursive writing has me on a quest for an italic nib that will be a little smoother for this purpose.

 

James


Edited by Manalto, 10 January 2015 - 12:55.

James


#5 Stu L

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 14:00

Glad you're enjoying them. I bought a similar set some time ago - it was reduced to £0.99, and though its obviously made to a price, its held up well. No leaks, reasonable performance and most importantly it was enough to help me decide I wanted a good quality fountain pen with a fine italic nib for everyday writing.
Fine cursive italics are now my favorite nibs :)

Edited by Stu L, 10 January 2015 - 14:00.


#6 Manalto

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 21:17

Stu,

Do you have a favorite cursive italic nib and/or pen?

Just got my calligraphy book (Maryanne Grebenstein) today, so out of my way! (You don't want to get ink on yourself.) 

James


James


#7 Stu L

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 21:46

Indeed I do.

 

I had a Lamy Safari when I first started playing with Italics, so first I put a 1.1 nib on that. It was a bit wide for my normal hand - fast notes and such. So I ended up with a fine cursive italic on an Italix Parsons Essential. There the line variation is subtle but I can write at speed and the nib is just so beautifully smooth.

It's worth saying though, that I have always preferred finer nibs and have only recently branched out into mediums. I think that's a path that a lot of people take when using fountain pens....

 

But yeah the Parsons is an incredible pen all round - whatever nibs in it. My hand isn't that great, but italic nibs sure make writing more interesting.



#8 Manalto

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 22:50

I'm moving in the opposite direction. Initially I preferred the broad pens because their line is easy to distinguish from ballpoint and other non-fountain pens and ink color is more dramatic, but the result is usually too crowded (and may even fill in) at the size I naturally write. The Parsons Essential is an elegant pen and has a good reputation; I'll check it out. Thank you! 


James






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