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The “Triveni Junior” From Fountain Pen Revolution (Fpr)

fountain pen revolution triveni indian pens

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49 replies to this topic

#21 ThegreatandpowerfullR

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 22:18

The only problem I have with the old Triveni is that the nib looked really small because the pen was so big, but it is not a problem and I still love blue and green ebonite coloring.  The products at FPR are really good values for your money, especially for so cheap.


If anybody wants to buy a FPR triveni, a waterman's crusader with a modified barrel, or faber castell pitt brush pens I have one just for you!


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#22 Jamerelbe

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 23:35

The only problem I have with the old Triveni is that the nib looked really small because the pen was so big, but it is not a problem and I still love blue and green ebonite coloring.  The products at FPR are really good values for your money, especially for so cheap.

 

The new #5.5 nib will fit in the existing (Serwex MB) Section of the old Trivenis, and may go some way to addressing that concern - but I agree, I don't find it a bit problem at all, the #5 nib provides a very pleasant writing experience!



#23 Armand.D

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 20:48

This is a very good review, thank you ! :thumbup:

 

I was hesitating between this and goulet nibbed jinhaos, ahabs but it is very interesting for me who are in highschool (as i write a lot), with the triple filling system = it's true genius.

 

Well, unexpensive, seems to be well-built and from what you've said the nibs will do the job correctly.

Other nibs are also available, so..

 

I am almost sold :)

 

Questions: For the finer nibs (F, EF), you needed micromesh, it is foundable easily everywhere ?

 

I wondered myself how these nibs would perform compared to goulet/typical #6 but there's bigger so there are no really possible comparisons I guess..

 

 

I am a little bit afraid about the weight as i am currently writing with a safari, and also about the lenght but 16 years old with normal hands i think that there will be no problems.

 

Words of the end: .. I'm looking forward to your answer, Thank you ;)


Edited by Armand.D, 10 January 2015 - 20:53.


#24 Jamerelbe

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 04:13

This is a very good review, thank you ! :thumbup:

 

I was hesitating between this and goulet nibbed jinhaos, ahabs but it is very interesting for me who are in highschool (as i write a lot), with the triple filling system = it's true genius.

 

Well, unexpensive, seems to be well-built and from what you've said the nibs will do the job correctly.

Other nibs are also available, so..

 

I am almost sold :)

 

Questions: For the finer nibs (F, EF), you needed micromesh, it is foundable easily everywhere ?

 

I wondered myself how these nibs would perform compared to goulet/typical #6 but there's bigger so there are no really possible comparisons I guess..

 

 

I am a little bit afraid about the weight as i am currently writing with a safari, and also about the lenght but 16 years old with normal hands i think that there will be no problems.

 

Words of the end: .. I'm looking forward to your answer, Thank you ;)

 

Thanks for your comments and questions - I'll do my best to answer, but please feel free to ask again if I miss something!

 

Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR) do sell #6 nibs, in addition to the #5.5 nibs - and yes, they are very comparable to the Goulet nibs in terms of size and quality.  The FPR #6 nibs would fit into a Noodler's Ahab or Konrad pen, but are too big for the Triveni.  

 

I would recommend the Triveni over the Noodler's pens for one main reason: I find that the Noodler's pens tend to dry out if you leave them inked up for any length of time, whereas the air seal on the Triveni pens (when the cap is screwed on) seems to be more secure.  Personally, I also prefer the material the FPR pens are made of - the ebonite Triveni pens in particular (I think) will be more robust, and less prone to crack and break.

 

The Goulet nibs are very good quality - made by JoWo in Germany.  I have about 6 of them, and I find them very smooth and pleasant to write with.  The only thing I know about the manufacture of the FPR nibs is that their tipping is done in Germany - I don't know who the supplier is.  When I asked about it, Kevin said that the EF nibs are often a little scratchy, and need a little adjustment - if you're not sure how to do that, you might be better off with a Fine or Flex nib.  That's the one place where I think these nibs are a little 'inferior' to the Goulet nibs - I've bought 2 EF nibs from Goulet Pens, and they were perfectly smooth on arrival.  Apart from the EFs, though, every other FPR nib I've tried in the #5.5 range (flex, medium and broad) are really good writers.  The Broad is also really juicy!

 

Micromesh is an ultra-fine kind of "sandpaper" - I have managed to find suppliers here in Australia, and a number of American online pen retailers sell them.  I don't know about Europe, sorry!  If you look around on this forum, though, you'll find there are other alternatives to micro-mesh, including 'lapping film' or 'mylar paper' (I think those are different names for the same product).  I would expect you could source some easily enough - and you'll find it comes in handy, not just for the Triveni pens, but for any other nib that needs a bit of smoothing.

 

The Triveni pens are quite light, because of the material they're made from - if you're used to a Safari, that won't be a problem.  I expect length would be OK - if you buy a full-length Triveni (not the Junior), you may not want to post the cap on the end of the pen, but it's light enough that you could do so if you wished.  The Safari is also very long if you want to post it, so... again,  I don't think you'll have a problem.

 

In the end, the decision is yours.  I like my Noodler's pens (2 Ahabs and a Konrad), apart from their tendency to dry out - and I REALLY like my Triveni pens (one Junior, two full-size).

 

Hope all of that helps - let me know if you'd like me to clarify anything!



#25 Helen350

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 09:06

I recently purchased the Treveni Jr. Ebonite - red with a broad nib.  This pen was smooth writing right out of the packaging.  The smell of the ebonite material is unique, and assures that it is indeed the real deal.  I like the size of the Jr. version of this pen, as well as how it handles when writing.  Excellent pricing - cost $32.  My next FPR purchase will be the Jr. acrylic with a broad nib.  They are lighter than what I have become accustomed to in my Jinhao X750s.    Currently have this pen inked with Chesterfield Emerald.  I also own a Noodler's Ebonite pen with a Goulet 1.1 stub.  I like both the tactile feel of the ebonite, as well as its look.


Edited by Helen350, 11 January 2015 - 09:12.


#26 Armand.D

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 10:17

 

Thanks for your comments and questions - I'll do my best to answer, but please feel free to ask again if I miss something!

 

Fountain Pen Revolution (FPR) do sell #6 nibs, in addition to the #5.5 nibs - and yes, they are very comparable to the Goulet nibs in terms of size and quality.  The FPR #6 nibs would fit into a Noodler's Ahab or Konrad pen, but are too big for the Triveni.  

 

I would recommend the Triveni over the Noodler's pens for one main reason: I find that the Noodler's pens tend to dry out if you leave them inked up for any length of time, whereas the air seal on the Triveni pens (when the cap is screwed on) seems to be more secure.  Personally, I also prefer the material the FPR pens are made of - the ebonite Triveni pens in particular (I think) will be more robust, and less prone to crack and break.

 

The Goulet nibs are very good quality - made by JoWo in Germany.  I have about 6 of them, and I find them very smooth and pleasant to write with.  The only thing I know about the manufacture of the FPR nibs is that their tipping is done in Germany - I don't know who the supplier is.  When I asked about it, Kevin said that the EF nibs are often a little scratchy, and need a little adjustment - if you're not sure how to do that, you might be better off with a Fine or Flex nib.  That's the one place where I think these nibs are a little 'inferior' to the Goulet nibs - I've bought 2 EF nibs from Goulet Pens, and they were perfectly smooth on arrival.  Apart from the EFs, though, every other FPR nib I've tried in the #5.5 range (flex, medium and broad) are really good writers.  The Broad is also really juicy!

 

Micromesh is an ultra-fine kind of "sandpaper" - I have managed to find suppliers here in Australia, and a number of American online pen retailers sell them.  I don't know about Europe, sorry!  If you look around on this forum, though, you'll find there are other alternatives to micro-mesh, including 'lapping film' or 'mylar paper' (I think those are different names for the same product).  I would expect you could source some easily enough - and you'll find it comes in handy, not just for the Triveni pens, but for any other nib that needs a bit of smoothing.

 

The Triveni pens are quite light, because of the material they're made from - if you're used to a Safari, that won't be a problem.  I expect length would be OK - if you buy a full-length Triveni (not the Junior), you may not want to post the cap on the end of the pen, but it's light enough that you could do so if you wished.  The Safari is also very long if you want to post it, so... again,  I don't think you'll have a problem.

 

In the end, the decision is yours.  I like my Noodler's pens (2 Ahabs and a Konrad), apart from their tendency to dry out - and I REALLY like my Triveni pens (one Junior, two full-size).

 

Hope all of that helps - let me know if you'd like me to clarify anything!

Thank you for the detailed answer ! :)

I use a Noodler's ink and i think that it would be safer in the Triveni.

 

About the nibs :

 

I've never ajusted one but following the videos of Kevin it should be alright I guess.

I usually used Fine nibs but on the Safari i found it sometimes to put a too wide line with my favorite ink, which is probably a little too wet. So..

 

EF will be probably my choice along with a F and maybe a Flex.

For Micromesh i can found easily what to deal with, there are no problems.

 

If they're produced in Germany that's a good thing.

 

Size :

 

You have rassured me about it,

There is 1cm less so it will be alright,

 

I can post it as you said.

 

  • Triveni Jr → 13cm
  • Safari → 14 cm
  • Triveni → 15cm

But to be honest, i don't usually post my pens (Safari and others).

 

Others :

 

I've never used an ED system also, but according to the videos it not seems to be complicated and it is a HUGE plus !

Imho this pen should be a great deal.

 

Thank you for the clarifies ;)

 

(I'll probably order one soon, and then i would post pictures and impressions in this thread)

(If i have any other questions i think that i will come back to you)

 

 

(If i purchase this my writing set will be)

  • Triveni Jr → Noodler's Q'ternity = 1st pen
  • Safari →  Skrip Red = 2nd pen

Edited by Armand.D, 11 January 2015 - 10:33.


#27 Armand.D

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 10:19

I recently purchased the Treveni Jr. Ebonite - red with a broad nib.  This pen was smooth writing right out of the packaging.  The smell of the ebonite material is unique, and assures that it is indeed the real deal.  I like the size of the Jr. version of this pen, as well as how it handles when writing.  Excellent pricing - cost $32.  My next FPR purchase will be the Jr. acrylic with a broad nib.  They are lighter than what I have become accustomed to in my Jinhao X750s.    Currently have this pen inked with Chesterfield Emerald.  I also own a Noodler's Ebonite pen with a Goulet 1.1 stub.  I like both the tactile feel of the ebonite, as well as its look.

That's good, thank you.

It is rassuring me about the feel of the pen, definitly a sweet deal.



#28 Jamerelbe

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 12:55

@Armand, with the full-sized Triveni, I prefer not to post - no real reason, simply because it looks to long!  The Triveni Junior, on the other hand, is just long enough for me to write with unposted - so someone with a bigger hand might find they have no option.  It seems to post fairly securely, though - so that shouldn't be a problem for most users.



#29 GTVi

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 13:41

Thank you Jamerelbe for the great review.

 

I have just pulled the trigger on one. Cheers.



#30 Armand.D

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 15:29

@Armand, with the full-sized Triveni, I prefer not to post - no real reason, simply because it looks to long!  The Triveni Junior, on the other hand, is just long enough for me to write with unposted - so someone with a bigger hand might find they have no option.  It seems to post fairly securely, though - so that shouldn't be a problem for most users.

Ok.

In a few days i'll order the Triveni Jr with some supplies (i don't have money on paypal for now), my choice is done :)

I will put here photos when I will get all of this, along with impressions.

 

Thank you.



#31 pqu11

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 18:13

And I'm back, the Trivenis (Jr) have just arrived! I am very pleasantly surprised with the performance right out of the box and really enjoy the beautiful ebonite finish! The size is just right, not too short as I feared, they are comfortable to hold un-posted as I prefer it, I have somewhat mid-sized hands and I have no problems. I got them with the FPR two-tone flex nibs and they work well too. These though are not for true flex I would say but are great for a bit of line variation. The feed just won't keep up. That's not at all surprising and I don't really mind. For that I have my Noodler's pens.

To sum it up, I couldn't be happier with the Triveni Junior, the pens work and look amazing. Included are pics so you can admire the ebonite finish.

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#32 Armand.D

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 20:12

And I'm back, the Trivenis (Jr) have just arrived! I am very pleasantly surprised with the performance right out of the box and really enjoy the beautiful ebonite finish! The size is just right, not too short as I feared, they are comfortable to hold un-posted as I prefer it, I have somewhat mid-sized hands and I have no problems. I got them with the FPR two-tone flex nibs and they work well too. These though are not for true flex I would say but are great for a bit of line variation. The feed just won't keep up. That's not at all surprising and I don't really mind. For that I have my Noodler's pens.

To sum it up, I couldn't be happier with the Triveni Junior, the pens work and look amazing. Included are pics so you can admire the ebonite finish.

That's awesome, thank you ! :thumbup:

I'm planning to purchase one soon, and as a noobie I don't see well what you mean by saying the feed "won't keep up", so i have questions about this, it is upseting writing normally everyday (at school) ?



#33 Helen350

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 01:48

And I'm back, the Trivenis (Jr) have just arrived! I am very pleasantly surprised with the performance right out of the box and really enjoy the beautiful ebonite finish! The size is just right, not too short as I feared, they are comfortable to hold un-posted as I prefer it, I have somewhat mid-sized hands and I have no problems. I got them with the FPR two-tone flex nibs and they work well too. These though are not for true flex I would say but are great for a bit of line variation. The feed just won't keep up. That's not at all surprising and I don't really mind. For that I have my Noodler's pens.

To sum it up, I couldn't be happier with the Triveni Junior, the pens work and look amazing. Included are pics so you can admire the ebonite finish.

I really like the looks of the green Triveni Jr.  I have the red one.  I also own a Noodler's Konrad Ebonite Sahara Olive Ripple.  Like yourself, my Treveni Jr. also performed perfectly right out of the box.  Have fun with your new 'toy.'



#34 Jamerelbe

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 03:50

That's awesome, thank you ! :thumbup:

I'm planning to purchase one soon, and as a noobie I don't see well what you mean by saying the feed "won't keep up", so i have questions about this, it is upseting writing normally everyday (at school) ?

 

What @Ludevit means is that when you're trying to flex the nib, so that it lays down a large volume of ink on the page, in his/her experience the feed can't always keep up.  This results in railroading, and/or the ink flow drying up.  For everyday writing, this won't be a problem.

 

I have found that the Triveni seems to "keep up" with my flex writing better if I use a cartridge, rather than the supplied converter.  So that may be another factor to consider.  You can't really 'hack' a plastic feed as easily as you can the ebonite feeds that come in a Noodler's pen - or so I'm told!



#35 pqu11

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 08:46

I really like the looks of the green Triveni Jr.  I have the red one.  I also own a Noodler's Konrad Ebonite Sahara Olive Ripple.  Like yourself, my Treveni Jr. also performed perfectly right out of the box.  Have fun with your new 'toy.'

Thank you! I think I will, I really love ebonite pens.

 

 

That's awesome, thank you ! :thumbup:

I'm planning to purchase one soon, and as a noobie I don't see well what you mean by saying the feed "won't keep up", so i have questions about this, it is upseting writing normally everyday (at school) ?

It only concerns flex writing. Flexing is very demanding on ink supply. Even though the flex with this pen is mild, the feed is plastic so it does railroad and dry up when flexed (doesn't mean right away). Ebonite feeds are superior in this respect. But I find that it can be as quickly brought back to life by shaking and tapping gently so there was no need to saturate the feed through converter to get it to write again. So even if this happens it can be quickly and comfortably resolved. In other words I wouldn't buy this pen entirely for its flex abilities. But normal non-flex writing presents really no issue at all. The pen is a wet writer and the feed keeps up well. I think you will be satisfied.

 

 

 

What @Ludevit means is that when you're trying to flex the nib, so that it lays down a large volume of ink on the page, in his/her experience the feed can't always keep up.  This results in railroading, and/or the ink flow drying up.  For everyday writing, this won't be a problem.

 

I have found that the Triveni seems to "keep up" with my flex writing better if I use a cartridge, rather than the supplied converter.  So that may be another factor to consider.  You can't really 'hack' a plastic feed as easily as you can the ebonite feeds that come in a Noodler's pen - or so I'm told!

I actually did manage to hack a plastic feed but it was a lot of work and still the results were not extremely satisfactory, far from what non-hacked ebonite feed offers due to its superior capillary properties.



#36 Jamerelbe

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 10:51

Thanks @Ludovic for the reply, and further clarification. If you want a really cheap flex pen with an ebonite feed, the Guru by Fountain Pen Revolution is worth a look - it's nowhere near as attractive a pen, but you can do more to adjust the flow. I only dabble with flex writing, though - and I really enjoy the overall writing experience with the Triveni. As a daily writer, which can also be purchased with EF, F, M and/or B nib options, it's a really good buy.

#37 Armand.D

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 20:17

It only concerns flex writing. Flexing is very demanding on ink supply. Even though the flex with this pen is mild, the feed is plastic so it does railroad and dry up when flexed (doesn't mean right away). Ebonite feeds are superior in this respect. But I find that it can be as quickly brought back to life by shaking and tapping gently so there was no need to saturate the feed through converter to get it to write again. So even if this happens it can be quickly and comfortably resolved. In other words I wouldn't buy this pen entirely for its flex abilities. But normal non-flex writing presents really no issue at all. The pen is a wet writer and the feed keeps up well. I think you will be satisfied.

 

 

What @Ludevit means is that when you're trying to flex the nib, so that it lays down a large volume of ink on the page, in his/her experience the feed can't always keep up.  This results in railroading, and/or the ink flow drying up.  For everyday writing, this won't be a problem.

 

I have found that the Triveni seems to "keep up" with my flex writing better if I use a cartridge, rather than the supplied converter.  So that may be another factor to consider.  You can't really 'hack' a plastic feed as easily as you can the ebonite feeds that come in a Noodler's pen - or so I'm told!

 

Ok, thank you both !

So the Triveni is really what i will buy, I just have to wait for my Paypal account to be ready :)

 

Now I also know that for flex pens an ebotine feed is better than a plastic one, so this great, the guru seems to be pretty interesting in that price range.
 



#38 Jamerelbe

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Posted 15 January 2015 - 22:37

Just FYI, Stephen (SBRE) Brown posted a YouTube review of these pens today - check it out at:

 



#39 Armand.D

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 21:17

Well, I just ordered my Jr,

in Mottled Blue with an EF nib (along with an F nib, syringe and silicon grease so I'm covered) :)

 

Can't wait now for shipping, I really think that following what you've done (@Jamerelbe) on your nib, it should be smooth with my Noodler's ink (Even if not, Fine is here).

 

There is also the FPR videos, ..I can send a mail to kevin, and micromesh is not expensive.

It will replace my Safari as main daily pen, I think that it is great stuff :wub:



#40 Jamerelbe

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 21:36

Well, I just ordered my Jr,
in Mottled Blue with an EF nib (along with an F nib, syringe and silicon grease so I'm covered) :)
 
Can't wait now for shipping, I really think that following what you've done (@Jamerelbe) on your nib, it should be smooth with my Noodler's ink (Even if not, Fine is here).
 
There is also the FPR videos, ..I can send a mail to kevin, and micromesh is not expensive.
It will replace my Safari as main daily pen, I think that it is great stuff :wub:


Congratulations - trust you enjoy your purchase! Just remember to check the tine alignment on your EF nib *first*, and to go very gently with the micromesh. You can always smooth away a bit more tipping, but you can't put it back on if you've removed too much!





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