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Noodler's Liberty Elysium Or Baystate Blue

ink noodlers blue blue-black fountainpen fp pilot parker pelikan lamy

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25 replies to this topic

#21 Cypocryphy

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 19:43

I know this is an old post but I would say that the vibrancy of BSB will not have an adverse effect in the sense of eye strain or eye fatigue. The only thing that would cause that is small print or, obviously, extended periods of reading. Yeah less visible something is, the more you'll strain to read. Conversely, the more visible something is, the less you'll strain reading the text or writing. That means that the more vibrant an ink is the less you will be straining to write. In reassess to feathering, it's only a concern if you are publishing your notes or the feathering is so severe that the words become illegible. As you can see from above, it's not an issue with BSB. So my personal opinion is that BSB is one of the very best inks for note taking and is my de facto ink for that purpose.

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#22 ac12

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 20:10

@Cypocryphy

Not so.  Or there is something else that is happening.

I used to be a college grader, and while some of the bright colored inks that a few of the girls wrote in were visibly easy to read, after reading a page of that ink, my head hurt.  The color was just too bright for my eyes.  Call it, too much of a good thing.  I would use a bright ink for making notations on a page (so that the student and I could easily find the notations), but not for general writing.

 

But, then each person is different in how their brain processes what the eye sees.

I had a lady that set her computer screen to PURPLE.  I could not stand looking at that screen for more than 5 minutes, but she looked at it all day.


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#23 Octo

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 00:48

Check the fade-test charts to see which endures longest.

#24 inkstainedruth

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 04:22

@Cypocryphy

Not so.  Or there is something else that is happening.

I used to be a college grader, and while some of the bright colored inks that a few of the girls wrote in were visibly easy to read, after reading a page of that ink, my head hurt.  The color was just too bright for my eyes.  Call it, too much of a good thing.  I would use a bright ink for making notations on a page (so that the student and I could easily find the notations), but not for general writing.

 

But, then each person is different in how their brain processes what the eye sees.

I had a lady that set her computer screen to PURPLE.  I could not stand looking at that screen for more than 5 minutes, but she looked at it all day.

 

My husband used to drive his co-workers crazy because when he was writing code he'd want a black background with white lettering.  My mother's first word processor (this little thing from Tandy, IIRC) had amber colored lettering on teal/turquoise.

As for the topic at hand, I actually prefer Liberty's Elysium -- BSB leans a bit more towards the violet side of the spectrum, whereas LE is more blue.

If I want a bright blue that's supposed to be super permanent, though, I'll pick R&K Documentus Hellblau....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth


"It's very nice, but frankly, when I signed that list for a P-51, what I had in mind was a fountain pen."

#25 ac12

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 04:57

 

 

My husband used to drive his co-workers crazy because when he was writing code he'd want a black background with white lettering.  My mother's first word processor (this little thing from Tandy, IIRC) had amber colored lettering on teal/turquoise.

As for the topic at hand, I actually prefer Liberty's Elysium -- BSB leans a bit more towards the violet side of the spectrum, whereas LE is more blue.

If I want a bright blue that's supposed to be super permanent, though, I'll pick R&K Documentus Hellblau....

Ruth Morrisson aka inkstainedruth

 

In the early days, white on black was common (B&W monitor) before mono-color monitors (green on black or amber/orange on black) came out.

I had to suffer with green on black until the orange/amber monitors came out. 

My choice was orange/amber text on black background.  This was the easiest on my eyes.

 

The IBM mainframe terminals were mostly green on black.

 

My preference today would be again amber/orange on black.  The white background of today (Word, Excel, etc.) makes me feel like I am looking at a light bulb.  So I have to turn the monitor brightness down.  A white screen (transmitted/direct light) does not duplicate a white piece of paper (reflected light), and the effect on the eyes is different.


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#26 NORVIN

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Posted 03 March 2017 - 06:37

I have both BSB and LE.  I bought a brand new Noodler's Konrad Windego and inked it up with BSB.  I noticed immediately my pen was stained.  It took several cleanings and soakings to get the BSB stains out of it completely, but I was able to and now that pen is my LE pen.  It's much easier to clean ink off the pen after filling it and no stains :) so if you decide to try BSB, have a dedicated pen for it you don't mind getting stained.  Something like a Jinhao X750 or 599 (fountain pen with an international converter) would be the best choice.

 

As to BSB's performance, I like it, but hate how it bleeds through all my paper making two-sided writing impractical.  I now use it for checks and small notes.

 

LE's performance is much better.  It does bleed through the papers I use, but not as bad as BSB.  It is not the electric blue color of BSB, but LE has a nice blue color to it.  Kind of a light Navy color for lack of a better description.

 

I'd love to see a new BSB with the performance and spec's of Noodler's Black minus the black color.







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