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Lamy 2000 Oblique Nibs


15 replies to this topic

#1 English

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 00:41

I'm looking for a Lamy 2000 with an oblique medium or oblique broad nib. Anyone who has a Lamy 2k with an oblique nib: how do you like it? I have a Lamy 2k with an extra fine nib that writes more like a medium. I love the pen and the wider writing than it should nib doesn't bother me; but it has me wanting an oblique medium or broad. Anyone know where I could buy one in the US?

Thanks for any thoughts or leads!

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#2 jochums

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 01:29

I wish I knew where to get one, but I don't. I have always wanted an OB nib for my 2000.  The closest I have came to having one has been getting a 14k OB nib on a Lamy Studio Palladium.  It is an outstanding oblique nib...especially for a modern one.  I had a modern 18k OB nib on a Pelikan 800 and it was a big messy blob...not so with the Lamy.  the Lamy has nice spring to it too!

 

I bought the Studio used on the Bay, so I'm not sure how it made it here to the U.S.  Lamy's oblique nibs seem to be hard to come by here in the U.S.



#3 MCN

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 01:39

I have a 2000 with an OM nib. I like it quite a bit but it writes with much less line variation than I expected. It's not much different from an ordinary M. I special ordered it from Lamy USA several years ago. I find that Montblanc OM nibs give just the right amount of variation, by comparison.

#4 LuisAAbrilRomero

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 01:46

I have a 2000 with an OM nib. I like it quite a bit but it writes with much less line variation than I expected. It's not much different from an ordinary M. I special ordered it from Lamy USA several years ago. I find that Montblanc OM nibs give just the right amount of variation, by comparison.

 

I have made the same experience. Got my F nib swapped for an OM at Heidelberg. In short, was not worth it. Line variation is pretty non-existent. Next time I am in Europe, I will change back to an F.



#5 Segel

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 02:12

I wrote Lamy USA before I bought my 2000 to verify that an OB nib was available and that a swap would cost a nominal amount. This was about 18 months ago, before the Filofax merger and move to TX. I like the oblique nib and it fits my hand, but I probably would get used to a straight B nib quickly. I am not certain that I get any additional line variation with the oblique. I value this pen highly and like its modest appearance very much.

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#6 English

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 03:09

Great replies and advice ... thank you very much!  In looking for a source of L2k's with obliques, I ran across a post of someone who sent their B or M to Pendleton Brown and the writing sample was unbelievable - lots of crisp edges and line variations.  So I may give that a try.  I have a Twsbi with a Pendleton Brown fine-italic nib that is super sweet, so that might be the way to go.  

 

Thank you all again for the replies!



#7 English

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 03:14

 

I have made the same experience. Got my F nib swapped for an OM at Heidelberg. In short, was not worth it. Line variation is pretty non-existent. Next time I am in Europe, I will change back to an F.

Oh ... that's the perfect excuse to schedule a trip to Heidelberg!  Have only been to Germany once, many years ago and will hopefully be able to get back someday.  I absolutely loved it.  



#8 wastelanded

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 22:43

Different model, but I have OM and OB Safari nibs. The OB is wonderfully smooth and wet, but neither has much line variation.
"I was cut off from the world. There was no one to confuse or torment me, and I was forced to become original." - Franz Joseph Haydn 1732 - 1809

#9 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 11:32

I had a Lamy Persona ...18K nail OB.....no line variation, just for some one who is left eye dominate and writes canted/crooked.

I've tried modern even regular flex Obliques and was underwelmed.

 

Lamy has always had a harder nib...so '66 2000 is not a cure.

 

You have to go vintage '50-60's nibs from companies that made nibs with semi-flex and 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex, like Kaweco, Geha, Osmia, Pelikan or MB, to have oblique with some line variation.

Part of that is the then stubbish flatter tipping of those pen brands.

My Pelikans are a bit more stubbish...ie all the way across the tipping, than a couple of others that use less tipping towards the edge of the nib.

 

A fine poster defined it so: Stub nail is always max line variation, Oblique with some flex is always some  variation and max line variation on demand. 


German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 


#10 brewsky

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 15:28

Given some of the replies to this thread, I think some people might have a misunderstanding as to what EXACTLY an oblique nib is.

 

oblique simply refers to the angle that the nib is cut. It allows users (like myself) to rotate the pen for a more comfortable writing experience. 

 

I have several oblique nibs which I can provide pictures of if anyone is interested. Just because a nib is oblique does not mean that it will have line variation. Line variation comes from it being stubbed or italic. 

 

Hope this helps!



#11 MCN

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 16:04

Given some of the replies to this thread, I think some people might have a misunderstanding as to what EXACTLY an oblique nib is.
 
oblique simply refers to the angle that the nib is cut. It allows users (like myself) to rotate the pen for a more comfortable writing experience. 
 
I have several oblique nibs which I can provide pictures of if anyone is interested. Just because a nib is oblique does not mean that it will have line variation. Line variation comes from it being stubbed or italic. 
 
Hope this helps!


The problem is that there are several manufacturers selling oblique nibs with no further description of their characteristics. Some, like Lamy with their 2000, show little to no line variation while others like Montblanc write with a very pleasant variation. It would be great if manufacturers were more specific in describing their nib geometry, but that's going pretty far down the rabbit hole for the general public.

#12 wastelanded

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 16:53

A fine poster defined it so: Stub nail is always max line variation, Oblique with some flex is always some  variation and max line variation on demand. 


I have an early 50s Pelikan OB. Line variation with flex, as you say. Maximum versatility.
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#13 ink-syringe

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 11:26

This post. Plus a billion.

 

I constantly see folks talking about oblique nibs as if they are made to produce line variation. (HOW?). Stubs, Italics, flex are what give line variation, obliques are cut so you can hold the pen at an angle. You may have an oblique that has line variation. But that is not what they are for and I also think it is an odd belief. What do write on one tine for fine and both for broad? I don't get it and it is repeated here and on youtube pen reviews constantly.  I don't know. Maybe I am the crazy one. I have a few obliques. I never once expected (or got) any extra line variation out of them.

 

 

Given some of the replies to this thread, I think some people might have a misunderstanding as to what EXACTLY an oblique nib is.

 

oblique simply refers to the angle that the nib is cut. It allows users (like myself) to rotate the pen for a more comfortable writing experience. 

 

I have several oblique nibs which I can provide pictures of if anyone is interested. Just because a nib is oblique does not mean that it will have line variation. Line variation comes from it being stubbed or italic. 

 

Hope this helps!


Edited by ink-syringe, 17 December 2014 - 11:27.

Looking for a cap for a Sheaffer Touchdown Sentinel Deluxe Fat version

 

#14 Segel

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 00:16

Apart from the 2000 OB, I also have an OB nib that I picked up in Germany for my Vista. I sought the obliques because I rotate pens when writing quickly.  I used Waterman broad nibs for years and they were so smooth which such wide sweet spots that the rotation did not seem to matter.  Lamy's seem to have a narrower sweet spot, and I thought that the oblique nibs would make a big difference.  They do in fact make a slight difference to me that I really only notice when writing very quickly (the nib catches fewer crabs as they say in rowing). 

 

Regarding line variation. I had read on this forum that the 2000 broad nib had a mildly stub or italic cut to it that provided line variation.  When I write with an italic, I want to rotate it even more than with a regular nib so an oblique italic would be perfect for me.  The 2000 OB is as close I could come:  when properly rotated and aligned I get line variation, but on a different axis than with a straight nib.  The variation is on the bias or diagonals rather than horizontal versus vertical.  I tried to capture what happens in this very quick sketch:  the Safari italic produces narrow horizontal strokes and broad verticals, while the 2000 OB is narrowest at 45 degrees from vertical and widest at 135 degrees. When I hold the oblique properly there is no line variation between vertical and horizontal and maximum variation is between the 45 and 135 degree lines.   

 

In comparison, my OB Vista nib has no stub qualities and produces no line variation whatever regardless of the angle of stroke.

 

 

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#15 English

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 15:19

Given some of the replies to this thread, I think some people might have a misunderstanding as to what EXACTLY an oblique nib is.
 
oblique simply refers to the angle that the nib is cut. It allows users (like myself) to rotate the pen for a more comfortable writing experience. 
 
I have several oblique nibs which I can provide pictures of if anyone is interested. Just because a nib is oblique does not mean that it will have line variation. Line variation comes from it being stubbed or italic. 
 
Hope this helps!


I agree. I tend to rotate pens when I write, which is why I was looking for an oblique. It would be awesome if you had pictures of your oblique nibs you could post!

Thanks for the reply!

#16 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 20:28

Ink Syringe,

German '50-60's** oblique nibs have some flex. Semi-flex or 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex and are stubbish in nib form; not the American Bump Under.

 

** Outside of Lamy which was a nail still then. I did have a Lamy 27 OM, I think it was,  that had no line variation. It was after all a nail. So was my Lamy Persona OB.

 

Nibs with a touch of flex.

My Pelikan obliques from that era look good stub right across the nib tipping. There are other good manufacturers, that do not put the 'iridium' all the way across the bottom of the nib, and are flattish....but still give a stubbish line.

 

So you are adding a stubbish ground flatness at @ 15 or 30 degree cut grind of the nib to the tad of flexibility. I have been very, very lucky in no one mentions 15 or 30 degree grind when selling on German Ebay. I have both grind angles in OBB, OB, OM, & OF. I have some 15 of oblique pens, in a mix of semi-flex and 'flexi'/maxi-semi-flex.

I do get line variation with vintage, and more with a tad of pressure when I want it.

 

Modern obliques are to me a waste of money when looking for line variation.....I've had a modern nail Oblique and a Pelikan 200 with a nice springy regular flex nib that I trans-mailed did not do the trick. 

Vintage does. 

 

I would never buy another modern OB...the Lamy I had ended up a CI. Someone else wished that Lamy 27.

 

Many folks are left eye dominate and cant the nib 'naturally', for them a modern Oblique would be good, but they can not expect much line variation.

 

Perhaps some of the left handers could use a modern oblique, depending on what style the left hander uses.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 18 December 2014 - 20:33.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

www.nibs.com/blog/nibster-writes/nibs-germany & https://www.peter-bo...cts/nib-systems,

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 




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