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Smoothest Lightweight Pen

smooth lightweight pens

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#1 Fwdlib

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 05:19

Hi--I've seen several threads about the smoothest pens that people have tried, and it's interesting to see the variety of pens that are listed. One of my smoothest nibs is a medium on a Pilot Vanishing Point. However, because of the weight and feel of the pen, I don't feel comfortable writing with it for long journaling sessions. So I'm wondering if there are other pens that are equally as smooth (smoother also welcome!) and lightweight. 

 

By lightweight, I'm thinking of something similar to a Pelikan M200. My Pelikan is quite smooth, but not as "glide-y" as the Pilot VP.

 

Thanks in advance for any suggestions. I've seen Waterman pens mentioned as exceptionally smooth writers--is the Carène lightweight?



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#2 elderberry

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 06:03

I've owned a Carene once and it had a lacquered metal body so it wasn't as lightweight as a Pelikan.

 

You could look along the lines of acrylic pens (Edison maybe? I don't own one but they're receiving much praise around here). Platinum resin pens are pretty lightweight (too much for my taste). Omas resin or celluloid pens usually are quite smooth too. So are my Conway Stewart Churchills.

 

PS: The smoothest nibs I own are ST Duponts, but as far as I know they only make metal or lacquered metal pens.


Edited by elderberry, 14 November 2014 - 06:04.

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#3 maverick777

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 06:08

Hi--I've seen several threads about the smoothest pens that people have tried, and it's interesting to see the variety of pens that are listed. One of my smoothest nibs is a medium on a Pilot Vanishing Point. However, because of the weight and feel of the pen, I don't feel comfortable writing with it for long journaling sessions. So I'm wondering if there are other pens that are equally as smooth (smoother also welcome!) and lightweight. 

 

By lightweight, I'm thinking of something similar to a Pelikan M200. My Pelikan is quite smooth, but not as "glide-y" as the Pilot VP.

 

Thanks in advance for any suggestions. I've seen Waterman pens mentioned as exceptionally smooth writers--is the Carène lightweight?

 

I'd give Pilot another shot with the Custom 74, 91, or 92.  The 92 is an awesome piston filler and the FM nib is very smooth.  Each of these pens are very lightweight.



#4 Bo Bo Olson

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 07:21

A modern semi-nail 400 has that fat blobby 'glidie' nib. Can buy just the nib.

Perhaps Richard Binder still has some or even a 200's nib for lots less that he can smooth. He smooths all the nibs he sells.

He's cutting back on business, selling off lots of what he use to do.

 

A medium on your Japanese pen is actually a Western F. Try a Western M.

I'm sure a Binder smoothed 200 M is a good buy.

 

I was much impressed with the six 200's nibs I trans-mailed. But I prefer a bit of life to a nib, than buttery smooth glide off the Triumphe paper type only kind of nib.

 

Try a wetter ink. I like DA Royal Blue for that. The saturated ink, has a purple (royal) tinge to it.


Edited by Bo Bo Olson, 14 November 2014 - 07:27.

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#5 ac12

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 08:00

Smooth Hard paper.

Wet ink.

M or B smooth nib that is a little wet to WET.

 

Don't know what nib you have on your M200, but consider an adjusted and smoothened M nib.

 

My own smooth pens are:

- Parker 51, M nib, Private Reserve DC Supershow blue

- Esterbrook LJ, F and M nibs, Cross/Pelikan ink

- Lamy joy, 1.1 nib adjusted to be a bit wet, Sheaffer and Waterman inks

- Parker 45, M nib, Sheaffer Turquoise

- Sheaffer Touchdown, F nib, Waterman ink


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#6 estie1948

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 08:25

For a lightweight, smooth writing fountain pen try an Esterbrook J with a series 9xxx nib. My favorites are the Esterbrook Js with 9550 (extra fine) nib. I have, quite literally, written all day with one without any strain except that on my feeble mind. An Esterbrook J was designed for this very purpose and has performed efficiently for decades. An Esterbrook J, fully restored, can be had for less than $60.

Try one, you'll like it.

 

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#7 parnesh

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 10:48

 

I'd give Pilot another shot with the Custom 74, 91, or 92.  The 92 is an awesome piston filler and the FM nib is very smooth.  Each of these pens are very lightweight.

 

 +1 on the 92. A bit larger than the m200, slightly heavier with Pilots awesome nibs.



#8 Lou Erickson

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 15:30

You want smooth and light?  The Pilot 78g will probably fill the bill.  Pilot's nibs are usually very smooh writers, and the 78g is a light plastic pen.  It's also relatively inexpensive.

 

Maybe a Parker 45 if you wanted to go vintage.


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#9 robertChiefsFan

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 15:47

I've been highly satisfied with my Nemosine Singularity with a Fine nib.  It's smooth every time and it's lightweight.  I use it as my daily writer, especially when I'm writing in my journal.



#10 freewheelingvagabond

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 15:51

The Pelikan M200 would be a strong contender, as would be the Lamy 2000. 


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#11 zaddick

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 16:27

OP - get you nib on the 200 tuned to your liking rather than buy a new pen.

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#12 greensparcs

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 16:27

For a lightweight, smooth writing fountain pen try an Esterbrook J with a series 9xxx nib. My favorites are the Esterbrook Js with 9550 (extra fine) nib. I have, quite literally, written all day with one without any strain except that on my feeble mind. An Esterbrook J was designed for this very purpose and has performed efficiently for decades. An Esterbrook J, fully restored, can be had for less than $60.

Try one, you'll like it.

 

-David.

+1 I have one with a medium nib I snagged off a estie CX100 and its so smooth it astounded me 



#13 AG_ORD

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 19:44

Fwdlib, aloha from Hawaii!  My recommendations would be the following:

  • Pilot Elite 95S - pros: extremely light weight, butter smooth 14K nib, good size if you travel with your journal, (caps compactly, posts full size), convenience of slip on cap for easier deployment, and good value for the money for a gold nib pen; cons: ink capacity small, (uses a CON20 convertor or proprietary Pilot cartridges).
  • Original version of Pilot VP - the old faceted plastic models are very light weight.  As you already own VP's, you can swap out the nib/feed sections in the older models.  Pros: familiarity with VP, light weight, convenience of click open/close for easy one-hand deployment, very reliable, swappable nib/feed sections and I actually like the clip design better than the newer models as it is integrated better to the pen body; cons - ink capacity same as the Elite 95S, may be harder to find as they stopped making them in 1999, plastic is not as robust as the newer metal/lacquer construction.
  • Pilot Falcon, plastic model - pros: light weight, expressive lines, smooth nib; cons: little more expensive than other two models above, uses CON50 convertor so actually has a little less ink capacity than the CON20.

Best of luck and I hope these recommendations are helpful.  I use all pens, (Elite 95S, new and old VP models and Falcon), in my every day rotation and I have never been disappointed yet.



#14 Lou Erickson

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 20:49

  • Original version of Pilot VP - the old faceted plastic models are very light weight.  As you already own VP's, you can swap out the nib/feed sections in the older models.  Pros: familiarity with VP, light weight, convenience of click open/close for easy one-hand deployment, very reliable, swappable nib/feed sections and I actually like the clip design better than the newer models as it is integrated better to the pen body; cons - ink capacity same as the Elite 95S, may be harder to find as they stopped making them in 1999, plastic is not as robust as the newer metal/lacquer construction.

 

I have read from reputable sources that you can not swap the nibs from the older plastic faceted VP pens.  They're different.  If you try and get one - which many people like - you'll have to be stuck with that nib, or find another vintage nib.  Don't let me dissuade you from trying one, just don't be surprised when your current nib unit does not work.


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#15 parnesh

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 22:58

 

I have read from reputable sources that you can not swap the nibs from the older plastic faceted VP pens.  They're different.  If you try and get one - which many people like - you'll have to be stuck with that nib, or find another vintage nib.  Don't let me dissuade you from trying one, just don't be surprised when your current nib unit does not work.

 

I don't know if that is true. I have one of each, will try later. I think the Con-50 does not work properly in these but otherwise is fine. Atleast that is what Richard Binder says on his site.



#16 Lou Erickson

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 23:58

 

I don't know if that is true. I have one of each, will try later. I think the Con-50 does not work properly in these but otherwise is fine. Atleast that is what Richard Binder says on his site.

You are correct, I had been misreading that as the entire unit.  I feel silly.

 

I saw another thread confirming they are not compatible, so it would be great if you could check, as you have both at hand.


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#17 AG_ORD

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 01:24

 

I have read from reputable sources that you can not swap the nibs from the older plastic faceted VP pens.  They're different.  If you try and get one - which many people like - you'll have to be stuck with that nib, or find another vintage nib.  Don't let me dissuade you from trying one, just don't be surprised when your current nib unit does not work.

 

Aloha Lou, I own 2 of the older plastic VP's as well as 2 of the newer lacquer/metal VP's and I swap the nib/feeds in all of them....so far so good!  Hope that clarifies things.  Like Richard recommends, sometimes the CON50 convertor does not fit as well in the older plastic VP's, so I just use the CON20 convertor and I am good to go.



#18 jar

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 01:39

Sheaffer PFM with a stub nib.


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#19 Fwdlib

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 06:33

Fwdlib, aloha from Hawaii!  My recommendations would be the following:

  • Pilot Elite 95S - pros: extremely light weight, butter smooth 14K nib, good size if you travel with your journal, (caps compactly, posts full size), convenience of slip on cap for easier deployment, and good value for the money for a gold nib pen; cons: ink capacity small, (uses a CON20 convertor or proprietary Pilot cartridges).
  • Original version of Pilot VP - the old faceted plastic models are very light weight.  As you already own VP's, you can swap out the nib/feed sections in the older models.  Pros: familiarity with VP, light weight, convenience of click open/close for easy one-hand deployment, very reliable, swappable nib/feed sections and I actually like the clip design better than the newer models as it is integrated better to the pen body; cons - ink capacity same as the Elite 95S, may be harder to find as they stopped making them in 1999, plastic is not as robust as the newer metal/lacquer construction.
  • Pilot Falcon, plastic model - pros: light weight, expressive lines, smooth nib; cons: little more expensive than other two models above, uses CON50 convertor so actually has a little less ink capacity than the CON20.

Best of luck and I hope these recommendations are helpful.  I use all pens, (Elite 95S, new and old VP models and Falcon), in my every day rotation and I have never been disappointed yet.

Hi AG_ORD, I'm also in Hawaii! Thanks for your suggestions. They sound good. The Pilot Elite 95S sounds especially intriguing, and I've been seriously considering buying a Pilot Falcon.



#20 Fwdlib

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 06:35

The Pelikan M200 would be a strong contender, as would be the Lamy 2000. 

Yes, the Pelikan M200 was the standard I mentioned for a smooth and lightweight pen. I didn't know that the LAMY 2000 is also lightweight. Thanks for the suggestion.







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